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I have an executable that decrypts binary data input by user. My task is restoring the decryption algorithm without seeing the source code of the executable. I've already done about 50 attempts of decrypting, and judging by results the algorithm is obviously easy (XOR-like, but changing a byte of the input data usually affects two bytes of the output), and length of the key is definitely 16 bytes, but I still cannot restore it.

So, my question is: Are there any tips of successful restoring the decryption algorithm? Some guidelines or any other help will be greatly appreciated.

Here are some real examples, I can see the regularity there, but I cannot understand the whole algorithm. If I enter more than 16 bytes (e.g. 17 zero bytes), the output byte sequence repeats. The left part is what I enter, the right is what I get (everything is hex):

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 -> 73 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 AA 65
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 -> 94 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 AA 66
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 -> 93 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 AA 75
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 -> 83 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 AA 76
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00 -> 83 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 A9 64
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 00 -> 94 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 BA 55
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 -> 94 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 B9 54
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 01 00 -> 94 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 75 A8 64
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 -> 73 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 AA 63

P.S. This is not a "hacking" in the common sense. I'm writing a 3D model viewer for an unfamous format (.bmd), but some of the models are encrypted, so I want to implement my own internal decrypter instead of using an external executable.

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Have any examples for inputs with hex values other than 1 and 0? What does 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 give you? –  Null Set Mar 25 '11 at 18:38
    
@Null Set, yes, sure. It gives me 73 36 15 B9 95 5D 8E EA 01 72 1C F4 FA 76 AA 63, I'll add this to the examples list. –  Joulukuusi Mar 25 '11 at 19:53
1  
An excellent object lesson in not inventing your own ciphers, because someone (in this case @Angel and the SO community) will break them. ;) –  Nick Johnson Mar 28 '11 at 6:22
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your approach is quite correct. If we assume that it is a 16 byte block encryption and that it indeed is a xor code you can proceed as follows (note all calculations are done modulo 2):

  • The input block is 128 bits and output block also
  • Encryption can be done described by a 128x128 binary matrix E: out = e(in) = E*in + e(0)
  • Each row in E basically tells you which bits will be flipped in output if you change the corresponding bit in the input.
  • You can get E and e(0) using your approach and set one bit each and calculate the output. Thus you get matrix E row by row, i.e. you need 128 input values to gather the complete matrix. e(0) is simply encoding of the zero-string.
  • The decryption is then defined by d(out) = D*(out-e(0)) with a matrix D.
  • If we plug together both we get in = d(out) = D*(E*in+e(0)-e(0)) = D*E*in.
  • Thus we have to calculate the binary inverse of the encryption matrix E. There are known algorithms for this problem (see e.g. http://en.literateprograms.org/Binary_matrix_%28Java%29).

Edit: I checked whether the example you gave fits into the assumptions. If it was a plain XOR code we would have XOR[1st line, 2nd line, 3rd line, 4th line] = 0 on input and output. Same for XOR[1st line, 5th line, 6th line, 7th line] = 0. In the limited data provided it holds true for all bits but the first 8 in the output (which does not tell much since only few bits are affected anyway). Unfortunately I cannot tell you more at the moment with such limited data available.

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I've fully understood your assumptions and conclusions, thank you so much! I also noticed a strange behaviour of the first byte of output, and after some researches I found where the problem lies. That's the decrypting executable fail, it shows different outputs with the same file, and the difference is just int the first byte. The right output is shown only the first time I use the executable. So, your assumptions were absolutely correct, and now I'm going to get the binary matrix E. Once again, thank you very much! –  Joulukuusi Mar 25 '11 at 21:12
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How big is the executable - can you disassemble it and reverse engineer the decryption from that?

Maybe post some examples that show why you think it works the way you think - someone else may spot something...

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The executable is about 500kb, written in Delphi. I've successfully decompiled it, but it will take a lot of time for me to understand assembly language, probably more than decrypting. As for the examples, I'll update the question within few minutes.Thank you for the interest. –  Joulukuusi Mar 25 '11 at 16:13
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What you want is most likely to use a gray code to decrypt the file. A gray code can be decrypt with some xors like this: http://www.morkalork.com/mork/article/74/How_to_understand_and_use_Gray_code.htm

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That's some serious leap of intuition. What do you base this answer on? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 25 '11 at 12:58
    
Thank you for this suggestion, but a Gray code implementation didn't give me the results I expected. –  Joulukuusi Mar 25 '11 at 16:15
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