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I have a

ObservableCollection<BasicClass> allCollection;
ObservableCollection<BasicClass> selectedCollection;

where

BasicClass
{
public Name {get;set;}
public Age {get;set;}
}

Now I added many BasicClass items to allCollection and only selected BasicClass to selectedCollection

SomeWhere I want to add items in selectedCollection which are not there in allCollection. I tried this

 foreach(var a in allCollection)
    {
          foreach(var s in selectedCollection)
             if(a.Name!=s.Name)
              //selectedCollection.Add(new BasicClass {Name =a.Name, Age=a.Age}); 
    }

But the problem is that this code is adding new BasicClass for each and every unmatched name, but my actuall requirement is, for each Name of allCollection compare all selectedCollection items. If it is not there then add else move for next Item.

LINQ solution could help this? Actually I achieved this by more if and flags but That looks ver hectic. My traditional solution

    foreach(var a in allCollection)
       {
           bool same = false;
           foreach(var s in selectedCollection)
             if(a.Name==s.Name)
               same=true;
        }
   if(same==false)
     selectedCollection.Add(new BasicClass {Name =a.Name, Age=a.Age}); 

And I hate this..

EDIT:

I don't want compare collection to collection. I want to compare collection1 value to collection2 all values, and if it not there then I want to add

share|improve this question
    
"my actuall requirement is, for each Name of allCollection compare all selectedCollection items. If it is not there then add else move for next Item." -- This is a description of a procedure, not a requirement. –  stakx Mar 25 '11 at 12:37
1  
Regular name comparisons make very poor keys. Real world data will often have people with the same name for example. How do you expect to handle those situations? –  asawyer Mar 25 '11 at 12:39
    
@asawyer this not an actual problem or senario... I gave just a simple example that could match to my problem. –  PawanS Mar 25 '11 at 13:32
    
Ok, just thought I'd mention it as I've run into something similar to that in a production environment and it caused all kinds of pain. –  asawyer Mar 25 '11 at 13:44
    
@asawyer ya it happens :) –  PawanS Mar 25 '11 at 13:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you sure you don't just need this?

        foreach(var a in allCollection)    
        {    
            if (!selectedCollection.Contains(a))
                selectedCollection.Add(new BasicClass {Name =a.Name, Age=a.Age});     
        }

EDIT

I've just seen your comment below about matching on name only, so the above is not really what you want:). Try this approach instead:

        foreach(var a in allCollection)
        {
            if (!selectedCollection.Any(s => a.Name == s.Name))
            {
                selectedCollection.Add(new BasicClass {Name =a.Name, Age=a.Age});     
            }
        }

EDIT

As Chris suggested you could also use "Except" to create a collection. I'm not sure this gains much, it may be quicker but it involves writing the comparer code and creates a new temporary collection. However, it is pretty succinct E.g. Once you had the comparaer written you would just need this to add your missing items to the collection:

selectedCollection.Concat(allCollection.Except(selectedCollection));
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that it has a runtime of O(n^2), while I believe the Linq based solutions are O(n) because they are using a Hash Table for the set operation. –  Chris Pitman Mar 25 '11 at 13:37
    
This working, short n sweet but if we not take the consideration of O(n^2), I will try to make it in LINQ –  PawanS Mar 25 '11 at 13:50
    
You could look at the "Except" appraoch suggested by Chris. I'm sceptical that it will make a huge difference, but I'll add some code to my answer. –  Steve Haigh Mar 25 '11 at 14:13

I'm not sure I understood your requirements correctly, so i may be missing the point...

Your BasicClass should implement the IEquatable<BasicClass> interface, so that two instances of BasicClass can be compared for equality:

class BasicClass : IEquatable<BasicClass>
{
    public Name {get;set;}
    public Age {get;set;}

    public bool Equals(BasicClass other)
    {
        if (other == null)
            return false;
        return string.Equals(this.Name, other.Name);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return Name == null ? 0 : Name.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Now you can use the Except method to find items that are in allCollection but not in selectedCollection:

BasicClass[] notSelected = allCollection.Except(selectedCollection).ToArray();
foreach(BasicClass item in notSelected)
{
    selectedCollection.Add(item);
}

Alternatively, you can implement a IEqualityComparer<BasicClass> and pass it to Except (instead of implementing IEquatable<BasicClass> in BasicClass)

share|improve this answer
    
'GetHashCode' should also be defined in the example. –  Chris Pitman Mar 25 '11 at 12:47
    
@Chris, yes, you're right... fixed, thanks! –  Thomas Levesque Mar 25 '11 at 13:28

You're right, this is more easily accomplished with Linq:

var itemsToAdd = allCollection.Except(selectedCollection);
foreach (var item in itemsToAdd)
    selectedCollection.Add(item);

On the other hand, this is just going to make both lists contain the exact same items. Sure this is what you want?

If BasicItem overrides 'Equals' and 'GetHashCode' based off of Name, then this is all you need. If it doesn't, then you will also need to implement an IEqualityComparer:

//Allows us to compare BasicItems as if Name is the key
class NameComparer: IEqualityComparer<BasicItem>
{
    public bool Equals(BasicItem first, BasicItem second)
    {
        return first.Name == second.Name;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(BasicItem value)
    {
        return value.Name.GetHashCode;
    }
}

You now pass an instance of this class to Except:

var itemsToAdd = allCollections.Except(selectedCollection, new NameComparer());
share|improve this answer
    
I just want to compare Name not age. What happens if Name are same but Age not –  PawanS Mar 25 '11 at 12:44
    
@Gaps Similar to what Thomas showed, you need to override both 'Equals' and 'GetHashCode' to only use Name in comparisons. If that is not the behavior you always want, then you must implement and IQualityComparer. I'll add some code. –  Chris Pitman Mar 25 '11 at 12:47

So basically you need a 'where-not-in'? Linq->Except is the way to go, to filter on BasicClass.name only implement the IEqualityComparer for Except.

share|improve this answer
    
Ya u r correct but it is not solving my problem. –  PawanS Mar 25 '11 at 13:33

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