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I'm trying to understand how LINQ deals with threading. The following code generates ThreadStateException "Thread has not been started". Why this happens?

        var threads = Enumerable.Range(0, 50).Select(x =>
                                                         {
                                                             Thread thread = new Thread(Method);
                                                             thread.Name = x.ToString();
                                                             return thread;
                                                         });


        foreach (var thread in threads)
        {
            thread.Start();
        }

        foreach (var thread in threads)
        {
            thread.Join();
        }

        Console.WriteLine(j);
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Your problem is unrelated to threading. When enumeration threads the second time your query is executed a second time and creates a second set of threads.

So you .Start one set of threads, and .Join another. You need to eagerly evaluate the query once, and then cache the result.

IEnumerable<Thread> lazyThreads = Enumerable.Range(...
Thread[] threads=lazyThreads.ToArray();//Evaluate and store in an array

You can also write it as a single statement:

var threads = Enumerable.Range(1,50).Select(...).ToArray();
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The threads variable is a query, not a list of threads. Each time you iterate over it, you execute the query over again, so in the second case, you are calling Join() without calling Start().

You can add ToList() at the end of the query to make it a list:

 var threads = Enumerable.Range(0, 50).Select(x =>{ ... }).ToList();
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You are enumerating the lambda expression twice (lazy enumeration) - your second foreach is therefore iterating through different threads from the first.

Try

var threads = Enumerable.Range(0, 50).Select( ... ).ToList();

foreach(var thread in threads)
...

Calling ToList() will create a list with the threads over which you can subsequently enumerate multiple times.

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In this case, you're not really exploring how LINQ deals with threading. Rather, you're using link to save a few lines of code while dealing with threading yourself.

Beginning with .Net 4.0, LINQ does some neat threading help out of the box. Investigate Parallel LINQ. Also check out the Parallel Extensions.

As for your old fashioned thread handling, with which you happen to be using LINQ, your problem actually does results from your use of LINQ. You're problem has to do with delayed execution. In debug mode, hover of the threads variable after that line is done. You'll see it's a query, not a simple collection. Every time you access this variable, it will get it's values afresh.

The fix is easy and very common: Just add .ToList() at the end of the first line. Your implicitly typed threads variable will then be a simple list, and behave as you expect.

var threads = Enumerable.Range(0, 50).Select(x =>
                                 {
                                     Thread thread = new Thread(Method);
                                     thread.Name = x.ToString();
                                     return thread;
                                 }).ToList();
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