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Creating a new Rails 3.0.5 project with Ruby 1.9.2, and then I use ab to test it:

ab -n 10 http://127.0.0.1:3000/

I found that the completion time of the view is alternating between 30ms and 60ms for the 10 results. Why does Rails behave like this instead of a more uniform rendering time?

Started GET "/" for 127.0.0.1 at 2011-03-25 06:40:26 -0700
  Processing by ProductsController#index as 
Rendered products/index.html.haml within layouts/application (15.3ms)
Completed 200 OK in 31ms (Views: 30.6ms | ActiveRecord: 0.0ms)


Started GET "/" for 127.0.0.1 at 2011-03-25 06:40:26 -0700
  Processing by ProductsController#index as 
Rendered products/index.html.haml within layouts/application (47.7ms)
Completed 200 OK in 63ms (Views: 63.0ms | ActiveRecord: 0.0ms)

  [ repeat for total 10 times ]
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it is Mac OS X Snow Leopard –  動靜能量 Mar 25 '11 at 15:58
    
What web server are you using? Passenger? Mongrel? Thin? Unicorns? Second question - how many instances of the web server are you running? Just 1, or two or more? Third question, are you using caching? Fourth question -- are you using production mode or development? –  Konstantin Gredeskoul Mar 25 '11 at 19:55
    
it is the most basic Rails 3.0.5: WEBrick and in development mode. (1 instance of WEBrick ... how do you have 2 or 3??) –  動靜能量 Mar 26 '11 at 16:22
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1 Answer 1

I'm emotionally prepared for the downvotes on this, but computers are unpredictable and evil. Background processes, data access, and caching all play in to your render time. Besides, I don't know how many clients will get pissed over 32 milliseconds. That's not even enough time to check bash.org

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ill surprise you with an upvote here. fact is this question may sort of be unanswerable. there are millions of things that can contribute to variations in processing time. like kyle says i wouldnt put too much into 32 milliseconds here and there. if it ever becomes a problem then you can certainly refactor and optimize, but honestly unless there is a problem with the 32 ms then i would not burden myself with trying to figure out which of the millions of variables contributing to that time may be causing the fluctuations –  Will Ayd Mar 25 '11 at 14:11
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