Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm querying the back-end of an application. For what ever reason the developer decided to use NVARCHAR for all fields. I'm having a problem with one of the "date" fields--somehow it got populated with "97630886". There's a companion "time" field and for my query I'm trying to concatenate and CAST the results as a DATETIME. I'm trying to use a CASE statement but it's erroring: "The conversion of a char data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range datetime value.". Apparently all conditions are evaluated? Is there a way I can rewrite my SELECT statement to handle this?

SELECT CASE 
WHEN LOG_DATE IS NULL AND LOG_TIME IS NULL THEN NULL 
WHEN LOG_DATE IS NULL THEN LOG_TIME 
WHEN LOG_TIME IS NULL THEN LOG_DATE 
WHEN ISDATE(LOG_DATE) = 0 OR ISDATE(LOG_TIME) = 0 THEN LOG_DATE + ' ' + LOG_TIME 
ELSE CAST(LOG_DATE + ' ' + LOG_TIME AS DATETIME)
END AS [LogDateTime] 
FROM ...
share|improve this question
    
Why do you expect this to work WHEN ISDATE(LOG_DATE) = 0 OR ISDATE(LOG_TIME) = 0 THEN LOG_DATE + ' ' + LOG_TIME if LOG_DATE contains 97630886? Regardless of what LOG_TIME contains it is never going to concatenate into something that will cast successfully as a datetime? – Martin Smith Mar 25 '11 at 14:32
    
My thinking was if neither field had something SQL Server recognized as a date I would just concat the two together and return that--some data is better than none. I was expecting the CAST() function wouldn't be evaluated since ISDATE('97630886') = 0 – SLeepdepD Mar 25 '11 at 14:33
    
You can't return different datatypes from different paths of a case statement. SQL Server will take the one with the highest data type precedence and implicitly cast to that (DATETIME has higher precedence than varchar). sql_variant has a higher precedence than both varchar and datetime though... – Martin Smith Mar 25 '11 at 14:36
    
I see. Well, since "97630886" is worthless when it comes to reporting back a date, maybe I'll just return NULL for that condition too: SELECT CASE WHEN LOG_DATE IS NULL AND LOG_TIME IS NULL THEN NULL WHEN LOG_DATE IS NULL THEN LOG_TIME WHEN LOG_TIME IS NULL THEN LOG_DATE WHEN ISDATE(LOG_DATE) = 0 OR ISDATE(LOG_TIME) = 0 THEN NULL ELSE CAST(LOG_DATE + ' ' + LOG_TIME AS DATETIME) END AS [LogDateTime] FROM ... This doesn't error. – SLeepdepD Mar 25 '11 at 14:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't mix datatypes in CASE expressions (or at least without taking care that they will implicitly cast OK)

when confronted with a stament like the following SQL Server will use datatype precedence to determine what the overall datatype of the expression should be

SELECT CASE WHEN 1=1 THEN 'not-a-date' ELSE getdate() END

For the above datetime has higher precedence than char so it implicitly casts the string to a date which fails.

The folowing succeeds however as sql_variant has a higher precedence

SELECT CASE WHEN 1=1 THEN cast('not-a-date' as sql_variant) ELSE getdate() END

So you can return multiple mixed datatypes that way (I'm not sure how easy sql_variant is to work with though)

Other than that you could return NULL for invalid datetimes instead of returning the nonsense data or cast everything to a string if you must return it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.