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What's the difference between the return values of these two expressions...

Expression 1: typeof foo['bar'] !== 'undefined'

Expression 2: 'bar' in foo

... assuming that these conditions are met:

  1. foo is an object,
  2. foo does not contain any properties that have the value undefined set explicitly.
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How about foo.hasOwnProperty('bar')? –  Rocket Hazmat Mar 25 '11 at 15:17
1  
@Rocket no, that's not the same thing - the property accessor expression will also examine the prototype chain. –  Pointy Mar 25 '11 at 15:24
1  
@Šime Vidas - yes, [[HasProperty]] is defined in terms of [[GetProperty]], not [[GetOwnProperty]]. –  Pointy Mar 25 '11 at 15:29
1  
Also, I don't think it makes any sense to think of a property as having an explicit "undefined" value - if an object has a property, then its value is something, at least null, but not "undefined". –  Pointy Mar 25 '11 at 15:30
1  
@Pointy Yes, I do not care about properties that are set to undefined. But I had to put condition 2 in there because otherwise I would have been flooded with answers pointing out that if a property is set to undefined, expression 1 returns false, and expression 2 true. –  Šime Vidas Mar 25 '11 at 15:38

6 Answers 6

The first tests the value of bar in foo.

The second tests for the existence of the bar property in foo.

var foo = {bar:undefined};

typeof foo['bar'] !== 'undefined'; // false

'bar' in foo;  // true

EDIT:

To add some clarification from the comments below, the issue OP is having is that accessing the domConfig property of window.document throws an Error.

This is an issue not related to the typeof operator, but rather to a specific issue with Firefox.

The issue has been documented here as a bug (back in 2003).

A few notable comments from that report:

Zbigniew Braniecki [:gandalf] 2003-11-19 09:09:31 PST

then why it can be iterated with for-in ?

Boris Zbarsky (:bz) 2003-11-19 09:24:05 PST

Because it is defined as a property on the nsIDOM3Document interface. It's just one that throws if you try to access its getter. ...

Zbigniew Braniecki [:gandalf] 2003-11-19 09:33:53 PST

... So what kind of bug is it?

The goal is to remove not implemented method/property from interface or to implement it?!?

Boris Zbarsky (:bz) 2003-11-19 09:53:23 PST

The goal is to eventually implement this.

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1  
@patrick I've updated my question. I am concerned about the return values of these two expressions... –  Šime Vidas Mar 25 '11 at 15:22
    
@Šime Vidas: Do you mean the type of return value, or the result? The type should be boolean for both, but the result may differ as shown. –  user113716 Mar 25 '11 at 15:24
1  
@patrick Condition 2 of my question states that foo does not contain any properties that have the value undefined set explicitly. –  Šime Vidas Mar 25 '11 at 15:25
2  
@Šime Vidas: Here's a bug report originating in 2003. –  user113716 Mar 25 '11 at 16:13
2  
@patrick Comment from 7 years ago: "The goal is to eventually implement this." They sure are taking their time. :) –  Šime Vidas Mar 25 '11 at 16:26

Given those two conditions, the expressions should give you identical results, except if

  • foo has an EcmaScript 5 getter defined for the bar property. Since the first expression actually reads the property value, that getter will be invoked. The second expression merely checks for the existence of the property so there is no need to incoke any such getter.
  • you are targeting Internet Explorer 4.0 - the in operator wasn't added until JavaScript 1.4 ;)

Here's some sample code to illustrate the difference in supporting browsers (Chrome, IE9, FF4):

var foo = {};
Object.defineProperty(foo, "bar", { 
    "get": function () {document.write("Getter invoked!<br/>"); return foo;}
});

document.write('"bar" in foo -->' + 
               ("bar" in foo));
document.write('<br/>');
document.write('typeof foo["bar"] !== "undefined" -->' +
               (typeof foo["bar"] !== "undefined"));
document.write('<br/>');
share|improve this answer
    
Well the spec says that the "in" operator will call [[HasProperty]], and that is defined as making a call to [[GetProperty]]. Won't that invoke the getter too? –  Pointy Mar 25 '11 at 15:37
    
@Pointy I must confess I didn't study the spec in that much detail, but observed the difference in Chrome, FF4 and IE9 –  Martin Mar 25 '11 at 15:49
    
Hmm. Well, it's certainly an interesting question; it's one of those weird aspects of the language that I never feel 100% sure about. Better to just avoid the situation whenever possible :-) –  Pointy Mar 25 '11 at 15:54
1  
@Pointy: No, [[GetProperty]] does not execute the getter, it just builds a Property Descriptor based on the property attributes, via [[GetOwnProperty]]. –  CMS Mar 25 '11 at 15:58
    
Ah, OK, now I understand what that means. Thanks @CMS !! –  Pointy Mar 25 '11 at 16:27

the first one first checks existence of 'bar' key in foo (undefined is returned if it's not found), then checks the type of that key. the second on checks only existence.

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var foo = {};
foo.bar = undefined;

console.log("bar" in foo); // true
console.log(typeof foo["bar"] !== "undefined"); // false

var Con = function() {};
Con.prototype.bar = undefined;
var foo = new Con;

console.log("bar" in foo); // true
console.log(typeof foo["bar"] !== "undefined"); // false

The in check is simply the same as using a for in loop and returning true if the key is in the for in loop.

[Edit] Didn't see your "don't explicity set it to undefined" condition.

var foo = {}
Object.defineProperty(foo, "bar", { 
    "value": 42,
    "enumerable": false

});

console.log("bar" in foo); // true (in chrome & FF4)
console.log(typeof foo["bar"] !== 'undefined'); // true

I actaully expected the in test to fail if you set it as non-enumerable. Seems like they are the same.

var foo = {}
Object.defineProperty(foo, "bar", { 
    "value": 42,
    "writable": false

});

console.log("bar" in foo); // true (in chrome & FF4)
console.log(typeof foo["bar"] !== 'undefined'); // true

Both test still work if the property is "readonly"

var foz = {}
Object.defineProperty(foz, "bar", { 
    "value": 42
});
var foo = Object.freeze(foz);

console.log("bar" in foo); // true (in chrome & FF4)
console.log(typeof foo["bar"] !== 'undefined'); // true

Freezing the object also doesn't break the tests.

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My reading of the spec suggests that they should be the same. The "in" operator semantics are defined in terms of making a call to the internal (conceptual) [[HasProperty]] method, which itself is defined in terms of [[GetProperty]]. When [[HasProperty]] returns "undefined", then the "in" operator results in boolean false; otherwise it's true. Based on the definition of what [[GetProperty]] is supposed to do, that means that an "undefined" result of a property access would have the same meaning.

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Given the conditions you outline, there is no difference. Both should produce the same boolean result and should behave the same around prototype lookup.

Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(null, foo, 'bar')

is another common idiom that does the same as those two but does not incude properties available only on the prototype.

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