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I use in my library three classes:

public abstract class Base<TFirst, TSecond>
{
    public Base()
    {
      // actions with ID and Data of TFirst and TSecond
    }
}

public abstract class First<TFirstID, TFirstData>
{
    public TFirstID ID {get; set;}
    public TFirstData Data {get; set;}
}

public abstract class Second<TSecondID, TSecondData>
{
    public TSecondID ID {get; set;}
    public TSecondData Data {get; set;}
}

How can I specify that TFirst must inherit from the First and TSecond must inherit from the Second, not using generic types for ID and Data in Base?

Like this:

public abstract class Base<TFirst, TSecond>
    where TFirst : First // without generic-types
...

Edit: In classes First, Second I use TFirstID and TSecondID for properties. In class Base I use this properties.

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could you clarify the question a bit, please? First : Base? –  foson Mar 25 '11 at 15:49
    
You mean you do not want where TFirst : First<int,int> I don't think you could do that, I think haskell allows something like this, Not sure. –  gideon Mar 25 '11 at 15:52
    
Foson: No, First not inherit Base –  Aleksandr Vishnyakov Mar 25 '11 at 15:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That can be tricky if they are dependent on signatures with those items. I'd probably say create an interface or abstract base without the type signatures. Interface more likely.

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There's no way you can do this other than by introducing a parallel class hierarchy without geherics and doing some runtime checks:

public abstract class Base<TFirst, TSecond>
    where TFirst : First
{
    static Base()
    {
        if(!typeof(TFirst).IsGenericType || 
            typeof(TFirst).GetGenericTypeDefinition() != typeof(First<,>))
            throw new ArgumentException("TFirst");
    }
}

public abstract class First { }
public abstract class First<TFirstID, TFirstData> : First
{
}

Alternatively, you can replace First with a marker interface (IFirst).

The runtime check is possible due to the fact that static constructors are invoked for each closed generic type.

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+1 Very interesting! But then he cannot actually restrict the generic TFirst to **be a ** First<anytype,anytype>, It could still be anything that inherits from ` abstract First`. I think this could be an anti pattern no? –  gideon Mar 25 '11 at 15:53

Usually in a case like this, I'll build another base class (non-generic) for First<TFirstID, TFirstData> to derive from, so:

public abstract class First{}

public abstract class First<TFirstID, TFirstData>
    : First
{
}

Then you can put a where TFirst : First into your declaration. It's not perfect, but it works if you're careful. But it can be tricky, depending on what you're trying to accomplish - you lose all of the genericness of the restricted type.

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One solution would be to have First and Second themselves implement an interface that doesn't depend on the generic type parameters:

public interface IFirst 
{
}

public abstract class First<TFirstID, TFirstData> : IFirst
{
}

Then ensuring that the type parameter in base must use IFirst

public abstract class Base<TFirst, TSecond>
   where TFirst : IFirst
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This is the only other way to avoid using the actual class while allowing the use of the generic types as something other than Object. –  KeithS Mar 25 '11 at 15:55

That's the way you would do it, if at all possible; specify generic type constraints which allow the compiler to catch invalid usages of Base's generic parameters.

If, for some reason, you couldn't use generic type constraints at all, the only other way to enforce type-checking would be to add run-time checks to your logic that would throw an exception if the generic was created specifying invalid generic types:

public abstract class Base<TFirst, TSecond>
{
    public Base()
    {
        if(!typeof(TFirst).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(First))
            throw new InvalidOperationException("TFirst must derive from First.");
        if(!typeof(TSecond).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(Second))
            throw new InvalidOperationException("TSecond must derive from Second.");
    }
}

The above code is a serious code smell. The whole point of generics is to allow a class to work with many different internal classes, while allowing the compiler to ensure that the parameter types used are such that the generic class can work with them. And besides, you still have to be able to reference the namespace of First and Second (which I assume is the reason you can't use them as generic type parameters in the first place).

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I think your code should look something like this: typeof(TFirst).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(First<,>)) –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '11 at 15:56
    
Probably, but my point was that the whole thing is a code smell; generic type restrictions should be implemented at almost any cost to avoid things like this. –  KeithS Mar 25 '11 at 15:57
    
Sure, I agree with you there. But if you post code, make sure it compiles. Otherwise, don't post it in the first place. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 25 '11 at 15:59

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