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My scripts are working perfectly fine. However, the content does not refresh itself to get new data. Why is it so?

 function updateMsg() {
    $.ajax({
       url: "/recent/notifications/",
       cache: false,
       success: function(html){     
         $("#profile_notifarea_msgbox").html(html);
       }
    });
    setTimeout('updateMsg()', 4000);
 }
 updateMsg();   
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1  
More details? Your content doesn't refresh? I don't get it. –  Tanner Ottinger Mar 25 '11 at 15:48
    
Shouldn't make any difference, but your "setTimeout" call can be just setTimeout(updateMsg, 4000);. What does FireBug show for the response from the ajax call? –  Pointy Mar 25 '11 at 15:50
    
...Is there new data to display? –  rockerest Mar 25 '11 at 15:50
    
Is your content coming back through the AJAX call properly? Have you checked the content through Firebug with Firefox? Amazing tool for things like this if you haven't got it. –  Chris Dixon Mar 25 '11 at 15:50
1  
Is your success callback executing? Is profile_notifarea_msgbox the correct id for the element you are updating? Not sure if it's a typo and is supposed to be profile_notifyarea_msgbox. –  Greg Mar 25 '11 at 15:51
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your setTimeout can reference updateMsg directly instead of using a string:

var timeout;

function updateMsg() {
   $.ajax({
      url: "/recent/notifications/",
      cache: false,
      success: function(html){     
        $("#profile_notifarea_msgbox").html(html);
        timeout = setTimeout(updateMsg, 4000);
      }
   });       
}
updateMsg();   

function stopUpdate() {
    clearTimeout(timeout);
}

To stop the continuous update you save a reference to the setTimeout in a variable and then call clearTimeout and pass in that variable. In this example, you would just call the function stopUpdate() to cancel the updates.

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If you put the updateMsg() inside the Success callback, wouldn't that suffice? I assume the idea is to update the page after the data is returned so you can probably do away with the timeout all together. –  Luke Mar 25 '11 at 15:55
    
@Luke Then it would call again instantly as soon as it gets a result. Depending on how fast the response is from the webserver it could be firing off ajax requests many times a second. –  Richard Dalton Mar 25 '11 at 15:57
    
@infernal whats the difference between your line of code and mine? I do have $(document).ready too just that its too long to put it here –  pivotal developer Mar 25 '11 at 16:11
    
@pivotal Only that it passes the function to setTimeout instead of a string. Which is a better way of doing it. Does the updateMsg function get repeatedly called? You can check by putting a break point in in firebug or just adding an alert. I've updated the answer to show the code I could use. –  Richard Dalton Mar 25 '11 at 16:19
    
@infernalBadger excellent insight here. It turns out when i use my own code, the alert does not trigger more than twice. However, with your line of code the alert pops continuously every 4 seconds. Therefore, i believe it is working now..thank you :) –  pivotal developer Mar 27 '11 at 6:02
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when you use ajax with jQuery try to always put an error function, in this way you can identify if something is wrong with the request

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