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Please consider the following 2 statements in Sql Server:

This one is using Nested sub-queries:

    WITH cte AS
(
    SELECT TOP 100 PERCENT *
    FROM Segments
    ORDER BY InvoiceDetailID, SegmentID
)
SELECT *, ReturnDate =
                (SELECT TOP 1 cte.DepartureInfo
                    FROM cte
                    WHERE seg.InvoiceDetailID = cte.InvoiceDetailID
                        AND cte.SegmentID > seg.SegmentID), 
            DepartureCityCode =
                (SELECT TOP 1 cte.DepartureCityCode
                    FROM cte
                    WHERE seg.InvoiceDetailID = cte.InvoiceDetailID
                        AND cte.SegmentID > seg.SegmentID)
FROM Segments seg

And this uses an OUTER APPLY operator:

    WITH cte AS
(
    SELECT TOP 100 PERCENT *
    FROM Segments
    ORDER BY InvoiceDetailID, SegmentID
)
SELECT seg.*, t.DepartureInfo AS ReturnDate, t.DepartureCityCode
FROM Segments seg OUTER APPLY (
                SELECT TOP 1 cte.DepartureInfo, cte.DepartureCityCode
                FROM cte
                WHERE seg.InvoiceDetailID = cte.InvoiceDetailID
                        AND cte.SegmentID > seg.SegmentID
            ) t

Which of these 2 would potentially perform better considering that both Segments table can potentially have millions of rows?

My intuition is OUTER APPLY would perform better.

A couple of more questions:

  1. Almost I am quite sure about this, but still wanted to confirm that in the first solution, the CTE would effectively be executed twice (because its referenced twice and CTE is expanded inline like a Macro).
  2. Would CTE be executed once for each row when used in the OUTER APPLY operator? Also would it be executed for each row when used in nested query in first statement??
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by casperOne May 8 '12 at 20:19

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8  
run, inspect query plans –  Mitch Wheat Mar 25 '11 at 15:53
1  
TOP 100 PERCENT ... ORDER BY is optimised out by the way and has no effect. I agree the 2nd one should perform better. You could also look at ROW_NUMBER and PARTITION BY to get the TOP 1 per group. –  Martin Smith Mar 25 '11 at 16:00

2 Answers 2

First, get rid of the Top 100 Percent in the CTE. You are not using TOP here and if you wanted the results sorted, you should add an Order By to the end of the entire statement. Second, to address your question about performance, and if forced to make a guess, my bet would be on the second form only because it has a single subquery instead of two. Third, another form which you might try would be:

With RankedSegments As
    (
    Select S1.SegmentId, ...
        , Row_Number() Over( Partition By S1.SegmentId Order By S2.SegmentId ) As Num
    From Segments As S1
        Left Join Segments As S2
            On S2.InvoiceDetailId = S1.InvoiceDetailId
                And S2.SegmentId > S1.SegmentID
    )
Select ...
From RankedSegments
Where Num = 1

Another possibility

With MinSegments As
    (
    Select S1.SegmentId, Min(S2.SegmentId) As MinSegmentId
    From Segments As S1
        Join Segments As S2
            On S2.InvoiceDetailId = S1.InvoiceDetailId
                And S2.SegmentId > S1.SegmentID
    Group By S1.SegmentId
    )
Select ...
From Segments As S1
    Left Join (MinSegments As MS1
        Join Segments As S2
            On S2.SegmentId = MS1.MinSegmentId)
        On MS1.SegmentId = S1.SegmentId
share|improve this answer
    
@Thomas: The ORDER BY is there because the OUTER APPLY/Nested queries need to run against the sorted right table, you see I need the TOP 1 row and that has to be from a Sorted table, that's why a TOP 100 PERCENT with ORDER BY there. Hmmm... I think ROW_NUMBER would be a good option too, wonder how I missed that myself :( I will check that and get back... –  r_honey Mar 27 '11 at 8:33
    
@Thomas: The second query's CTE is missing GROUP BY. –  Andriy M Mar 27 '11 at 11:17
    
@Andriy M - Doah. Fixed. Thanks. –  Thomas Mar 27 '11 at 16:22
    
@r_honey - TOP 100 Percent will not do anything. The query engine will simply remove it. The TOP used in the subqueries and Outer Apply are obviously a different matter. –  Thomas Mar 27 '11 at 16:25
    
@Thomas: Without adding TOP 100 PERCENT, the query is not accepted by Sql Server. –  r_honey Apr 7 '11 at 15:28

Maybe I will use this variation of Thomas' query:

WITH cte AS
(
SELECT *, Row_Number() Over( Partition By SegmentId Order By InvoiceDetailID, SegmentId ) As Num
FROM Segments)
SELECT seg.*, t.DepartureInfo AS ReturnDate, t.DepartureCityCode
FROM Segments seg LEFT JOIN cte t ON seg.InvoiceDetailID = t.InvoiceDetailID AND t.SegmentID > seg.SegmentID AND t.Num = 1
share|improve this answer
    
If SegmentId is the PK, num will be 1 for every row. –  Thomas Mar 27 '11 at 16:26
    
Hmmm.. Thanks for pointing this out... –  r_honey Apr 7 '11 at 15:28
    
@Thomas: Yes SegmentId is the PK. I think any solution based on PARTITION BY or OVER clause would not be feasible in this case, including the one you posted. –  r_honey Apr 7 '11 at 15:38

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