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I have a generic base wrapper class to wrap a couple of com components we're using:

public class WrapperBase<T> : IDisposable
    where T : new()
{
    private T comObject = default(T);
    private ComponentParameters parameters = null;

    protected WrapperBase()
    {
        comObject = new T();
        Initialize();
    }

    public void SetParameters(ComponentParameters parameters)
    {
        // ...
        this.parameters = parameters;
    }

    // ... 
}

Now I have a concrete wrapper class which inherits from this base class:

public class UserWrapper : WrapperBase<CUserClass>
{
    public UserWrapper() : base() { }

    public void SomeUserWrapperMethod() 
    { 
        // ... 
    }
}

The type used (CUserClass) is a COM interop type. This type is available after adding the COM object as a reference to the project.

Now I use this class in another assembly (which references the assembly in which the above types are defined):

using (var user = new UserWrapper())
{
    user.SomeUserWrapperMethod();
}

The above code compiles fine, but if I'm actually calling the SetParameters method (which is only defined in the Wrapperbase class):

using (var user = new UserWrapper())
{
    user.SetParameters(someParameters);
}

I get a (double) compilation error:

  • error CS0012: The type 'ComponentsAssembly.CUserClass' is defined in an assembly that is not referenced. You must add a reference to assembly 'Interop.ComponentsAssembly, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=...'.
  • ComponentWrappers.dll: (Related file) error CS0310: 'ComponentsAssembly.CUserClass' must be a non-abstract type with a public parameterless constructor in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'Contact.Wrappers.WrapperBase'

I've tried adding a reference to the component, but I still get the same error message.

This used to work before I changed the WrapperBase to a generic type, but then there was a lot of code identical in all the concrete wrappers, so I refactored it, making the WrapperBase generic in the process.

I can actually solve this by adding a constructor to the concrete class which takes a "ComponentParameters" as a parameter and calls the SetParameters internally:

public class UserWrapper : WrapperBase<CUserClass>
{
    public UserWrapper() : base() { }

    public UserWrapper(ComponentParameters parameters) : base()
    {
        SetParameters(parameters)
    }
}

And then using it like this:

using (var user = new UserWrapper(someParameters))
{
    user.SomeUserWrapperMethod();
}

But I'd rather have both methods working (using a constructor and explicitly calling SetParameters).

Can anybody explain to me what exactly is happening here, as I've been banging my head against the wall for the last couple of hours.

share|improve this question
    
So, let me get this straight, WrapperBase<> is defined in ComponentWrappers.dll assembly but you're actually using that generic in some sort of main program right? You added the reference to the interop in the main program itself, and not COmponentWrapper.dll? –  James Michael Hare Mar 25 '11 at 16:15
    
@James: Not exactly. Both WrapperBase<> and UserWrapper are in ComponentWrappers.dll and the com interop dll is only referenced in ComponentWrappers.dll. In the main program, I only use the UserWrapper class (and it references the ComponentWrappers.dll). But even if I add a reference to the interop dll in the main program, I still get the same compilation error. –  fretje Mar 25 '11 at 16:17
    
Have you tried adding a reference to the interop assembly to the main program.. –  Richard Friend Mar 25 '11 at 16:19
    
Okay, yeah, you would need the reference in both (because of the base class bleeding) -- that is when you have public class UserWrapper : WrapperBase<CUserClass> visible any assembly calling it must know CUserClass too. Hmmm. Odd. Were you adding the reference as interop in both? Or did you add it as a COM reference in one and interop assembly reference in other? –  James Michael Hare Mar 25 '11 at 16:20
    
To be clear: before WrapperBase was generic everything worked without the main program referencing the interop dll. –  fretje Mar 25 '11 at 16:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this: when you add the COM reference in ComponentWrappers.dll, it generates an interop assembly for it and puts it in the build location (bin/release whatever) for that assembly. In main, navigate to that location and add a a .NET reference (not COM reference) and navigate to that build location and take the interop as the reference.

I think it may be getting confused because you added it as COM in both places and it generated an interop in each...

The other option is to completely prevent the COM artifact from having any public visibility outside your assembly. To do this you'd have to hide it internally in a class, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
(let me know if that doesn't make sense, I can elaborate further). Essentially in ComponentWrappers.dll -> add COM reference, in main, add interop reference created in ComponentWrappers.dll's build location... –  James Michael Hare Mar 25 '11 at 16:27
    
Ok, thanks! That actually did the trick (add reference, browse to build folder select actual interop dll). But I was wondering if there wasn't a way to prevent this. Also, won't this give problems in release build, when I select the interop dll from the debug folder, or the other way around? –  fretje Mar 25 '11 at 16:34
    
Typically, when I've seen this done I've either seen people completely isolate the references to the COM class in one assembly so it doesn't bleed out, or have the interop be stored in a separate location. You can generate an interop directly from the command line and then treat it like you would any other 3rd party assembly. Or have a build step create it and place it in a given build location and then have both assemblies reference the interop directly. –  James Michael Hare Mar 25 '11 at 17:41

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