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Actually, this is the first time I see a code like this:

class A
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        outer : for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
        {
            for(int j=0;j<10;j++)
            {
                if(j > i)
                {
                    System.out.println();
                    continue outer;
                }
                System.out.print("  "  +( i *j ));
            }
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}

two lines I don't understand:

outer : for(int i=0;i<10;i++) // this seems similar to 'for each'?

continue outer; // I know that 'continue' will break the loop and continue the next turn, but what will do in this situaton?
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5  
Why the downvote? There are no stupid questions, only stupid teachers. – Aaron Digulla Mar 25 '11 at 17:08
11  
@Aaron: I think there are stupid questions, but I don't think this is one of them. – Jon Skeet Mar 25 '11 at 17:09
    
This kinda code is what happens when you translate legacy C into Java and are afraid to touch anything... – iluxa Mar 25 '11 at 18:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted
outer : for(int i=0;i<10;i++) 

defines a label for the outer loop, called outer

continue outer; 

means, go to next iteration of the loop labeled outer

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The outer: part is a label. It's basically labelling the loop. The loop itself works just as normal.

The continue outer; means "continue back to the start of the body of the loop labelled outer" (after incrementing and testing i of course). It's sort of like having a break; statement to get out of the inner loop, and then immediately having a normal continue; statement to continue with the next step of the outer loop.

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outer is a label, when continue outer; is called, the code will jump to the outer label and continue from there. The reason behind it in this case is that the coder wants to exit the inner loop when j>i and continue the outer loop.

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oh great, first time I know that java has this feature ... Thanks! – Eng.Fouad Mar 25 '11 at 17:08

Outer: is a label, instead of continuing the inner loop, you are continuing the outer loop by specifying the label

See also http://www.janeg.ca/scjp/flow/labels.html

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outer is a label, and continue outer basically does a goto but continues in the loop rather than starting it again.

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outer: defines a label "outer" which you can use in break and continue. It's only allowed in front of loop constructs (for, while, do).

So continue outer means "continue with the outer loop" or "apply the continue to the loop with the matching label".

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