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I have two tables, say Table A and Table B.

I want to have there to be a 1-* relationship between A and B, so for every A, there's one specific B, and possible multiple other Bs.

So I have tables like this:

Table A
AKey INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
PrerequisiteKey INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES B(BKey)

Table B
BKey INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
RelationalAKey INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES A(AKey)

I want there to always be 1 B for every A. Should I try to do it this way (above) or should I programatically decide that the first entry in B with the A key = is the "prerequisite" B?

I'd like to be able to store that PrerequisiteKey as a separate field, but SQL doesn't let me define tables this way because both tables need to exist before the constraints can be created.

EDIT: Or, is adding the first constraint after the tables are created the answer?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In these cases, you usually create the tables, then add the constraints. Use the ALTER TABLE syntax to change the FKs after creation.

ALTER TABLE A 
ADD CONSTRAINT aref FOREIGN KEY PrerequisiteKey  REFERENCES B(BKey);
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Yeah, I realized I could do this as soon as I had completed this. Thanks! –  DLeh Mar 25 '11 at 17:27
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You can create your 2 tables and then use the ALTER TABLE and ADD CONSTRAINT to create your constraint.

Ex. :

ALTER TABLE ..
{
    ADD CONSTRAINT ...
}
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Usually when I want to enforce a 1-1 relationship, I decide which table has to be entered first and then I use the id of that table as the PK of the other table (which enforces the uniquesness). Then of course create the Pk/FK relationship. If I can't have it as the PK for some reason, I put the FK field inteh table and create a unique index. You should not try to have an FK on both tables (I'd be surprised if SQl Server will allow it anyway)or you can't insert to either one.

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