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When creating a TCP client using the socket API, a port is used on the localhost for connecting to the TCP server.

The port that is used seems to be unavailable for another application which is a TCP server to bind to and act as a server.

Because the port used for the client is dynamically determined it may be a port that my application wants to use as a server.

Is it true that the TCP client will dynamically pick a port to use and prevent other programs from being a server on that port?

Can a client control what port it uses to make sure it does not occupy a port required by another program?

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You could tell us what language you are using. Then we can provide a sample code. –  Rafael Colucci Mar 25 '11 at 17:20
    
Hi, I am using C –  Ivan Novick Mar 27 '11 at 5:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is it true that the TCP client will dynamically pick a port to use and prevent other programs from being a server on that port?

Yes, It is.

Can a client control what port it uses to make sure it does not occupy a port required by another program?

Yes, you can but you should not. Use the Bind property.

OK .. heres the thing:

When you establish a connection to a server, you open a socket port that is greater than 1024. The point is, it is going to be a high port number.

Your server should not open a TCP port greater than 1024. Basically you should keep you server running in a low port. That is what all http documents tell us.

You can also check if a port are already taken, and if so, you can open your server socket in another port.

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-1: You can control the port, and the actual range is not in any way required to be >5000. Windows XP/2003 e.g would by default use the range 1025-5000. –  Erik Mar 25 '11 at 17:15
    
Yeah. I edited the answer when I realized I forgot about that. But you should not do that, unless you are right about the problem you may cause. –  Rafael Colucci Mar 25 '11 at 17:17
    
Removed the downvote now. –  Erik Mar 25 '11 at 17:20
    
Thanks. My mistake. I was trying to be fast and I ended up not thinking a lot .. lol –  Rafael Colucci Mar 25 '11 at 17:21

Yes, the port will be selected from a predefined range which varies from OS to OS, and blocked for other use. You can select a specific port with bind if you need this.

EDIT:

The only case where you can have multiple TCP sockets bound to the same local port/IP is when you accept() new sockets from a listening socket. You can never bind() a TCP socket to an in-use port/IP. There's also some confusion on SO_REUSEADDR, this socket option does not allow port reuse, it just relaxes the rules when there's only dead timing out connections bound to a port you want.

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If one program is listening bound on a port I don't believe another can as well. Generally, the lower ports are reserved for certain services such as HTTP on port 80. If you want a random port you should generate one above 1024. For a list of commonly used ports look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_TCP_and_UDP_port_numbers

edit: corrected from comment below

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Doesn't matter if a socket is listening or not, if it is bound to a port you cannot bind a new unrelated socket to the same port. –  Erik Mar 25 '11 at 17:17

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