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Why this condition is never true ? Both parts of the equation are integers, so there must be equality for index = 0, 10, 20, 30, 40. I am compiling this code using g++.

for(int index = 0; index < 50; index++){

        if ( (int) (10 * (  0.1 * index)  ==  (int)(10 * ( int ) ( 0.1 * index ) ) ) )
        {
                 std::cout << "equal";
        }
}

With MSVS 2010 compiler these problems do not occur...

  0  0
  1  0
  2  0
  3  0
  4  0
  5  0
  6  0
  7  0
  8  0
  9  0
  10  10
  11  10
  12  10
  13  10
  14  10
  15  10
  16  10
  17  10
  18  10
  19  10
  20  20
  21  20
  22  20
  23  20
  24  20
  25  20
  26  20
  27  20
  28  20
  29  20
  30  30
  31  30
  32  30
  33  30
  34  30
  35  30
  36  30
  37  30
  38  30
  39  30
  40  40
  41  40
  42  40
  40  40
  44  40
  45  40
  46  40
  47  40
  48  40
  49  40
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Which version of g++ are you using? Works for me. –  jbp Mar 25 '11 at 17:39
    
It's because in the second part of the equality you round the number with "(int)." 10 * ( int ) ( 0.1 * index ), for 15 it becomes 10 * (int) (0.1 * 15) which becomes 10 * ((int) 1.5) which becomes 10 * 1 –  sashoalm Mar 25 '11 at 17:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Your parentheses are wrong:

if ( (int) (10 * (  0.1 * index)  ==  (int)(10 * ( int ) ( 0.1 * index ) ) ) )

Should be:

if ( (int) (10 * (  0.1 * index) )  ==  (int)(10 * ( int ) ( 0.1 * index ) ) )
share|improve this answer
    
(+1) Well spotted! –  NPE Mar 25 '11 at 17:38
    
thanks, it works... –  johny Mar 25 '11 at 17:43

You're comparing two floating point numbers - 0.1*index.

Have you tried printing out the individual components when they're not equal? I suspect you'll find that somewhere in the equation, the results vary.

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It's because in the second part you have ( int ) ( 0.1 * index ). So (int) (0.1 * 5) becomes rounded to 0.

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The two sides are not both integers:

10 * (0.1 * index)

is a double, and uses 0.1 that as you probably know cannot be represented exactly in IEEE754 format (the only values that can be represented exactly are integral multiples of 1/(2^n) with n>=0). To make a parallel with base 10 normally used by humans a computer sees 0.1 more or less like you see 0.3333333333333... (and you dont' have infinte paper to write down all those threes).

You should follow the advice of ybungalobill, and by the way to me seems that your problem would be a lot easier to solve using a different approach based on integer arithmetic and the modulo operator.

if (index % 10 == 0)

seems to be the test you are looking for.

share|improve this answer

try

for(int index = 0; index < 50; index++){

        if ( (int) (10 * (  0.1 * (double)index))  ==  (int)(10 * ( int ) ( 0.1 * (double)index ) ) )
        {
                 std::cout << "equal";
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: Why not trying to change the name of the variable from index to i? Why not trying to use stdio.h instead of iostream? Why not trying to use unsigned instead of int? ... "try" (if we exclude a few areas like performance or user interface design) has no meaning in programming. Think and then do, or do not. There's no try. –  6502 Mar 25 '11 at 17:54
    
say what you will, i tried and it worked :) RAD programming is code first think later anyway. It all depends what you are doing... –  Marino Šimić Mar 25 '11 at 17:56
    
This is because you don't have a correct concept of "working" (that doesn't mean that you found at least one case where it gave the results that in your opinion are correct). And while "try and see" is bad in general for programming it's a true suicide in C++, because the language will punish your errors with undefined behavior daemons and not with runtime error angels. –  6502 Mar 25 '11 at 18:07
    
I agree with you, but i cannot compile the code in my head taking in accaunt compiler differences. That is why i try. Another alternative is to read both compiler documentation to find a reason. This of course can take months. –  Marino Šimić Mar 25 '11 at 18:14

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