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This piece of code seems to be creating some troubles while compiling. Any explanation?

int i =20;
int maxlen = i;
int main()
{
     int j = i;
     printf("i=%d , j=%d\n", i , j);
}
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3 Answers 3

In C, you can't initialize global variables using non-constant expressions. Initializing maxlen to i fails because i is not a constant expression. It's part of the C standard.

Why not #define a constant?

#define MAXLEN 20
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Thanx mate!!! i got the point now... –  phoenix Mar 25 '11 at 18:35
    
I think With the C99 standard you can use const keyword instead of define. –  Ubiquité Mar 25 '11 at 19:15
    
@Ubiquite yes, but I believe #define is more clear. –  Rafe Kettler Mar 25 '11 at 19:25
    
@Ubiquite, @Rafe, no in C99 you still can't. A "const qualified variable" is not a constant in the sense of th C99 standard. You could only use an enum constant to work around this. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 25 '11 at 21:21

You can only use compile-time constants when initializing a variable at that scope. Try:

int i = 20;
int maxlen;

int main()
{
   maxlen = i; // assign within the scope of a function
   int j = i;
   printf("i=%d , j=%d\n", i , j);
}
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Thank you very much and the info that you provided me with was pretty helpful... –  phoenix Mar 25 '11 at 18:34

This Code is Invalid in C but valid in C++:

C - http://www.ideone.com/mxgMo

Error Reason -: initializer element is not constant

C++ - http://www.ideone.com/XzoeU

Works.

Because:

The C++ Standard states:

3.6.1 Main function [basic.start.main]

1 A program shall contain a global function called main, which is the designated start of the program. It is implementation defined whether a program in a freestanding environment is required to define a main function. [ Note: in a freestanding environment, start-up and termination is implementation-defined; start-up contains the execution of constructors for objects of namespace scope with static storage duration; termination contains the execution of destructors for objects with static storage duration. —end note ]

However, C99 says this:

56.7.8 Initialization

4 All the expressions in an initializer for an object that has static storage duration shall be constant expressions or string literals.

So not just the code you posted, but something like this will also be invalid in C:

#include<stdio.h>

int needint(void);

int i =needint();

int needint(void)
{
    return 1;
}

int main()
{
   int j = i;
   printf("i=%d , j=%d\n", i , j);
}

See here.

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