Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got quite a large application which is currently being styled up. To save me changing all the buttons in the IDE/Object Inspector I am planning on just doing a few functions for the main objects like

procedure StyleButton(AButton : TButton)
begin
    AButton.Color := clGreen;
    AButton.Font.Style = [fsBold];
end;

etc etc and then add that to the forms onCreates as needed

StyleButton(Button1); whatever etc

There is no issue passing objects in params like this. It does just reference the first object right?

It works fine and I can't think of any issues, but because this is a large application which thousands of users I just want to be sure there will be no issues/memory leaks/resource consumpution issues.

Will also be doing similar things with TAdvStringGrid and TEdit/TMemo components.

Then allows just 1 place to change these settings.

Or someone have a better idea?

share|improve this question
    
Moved to separate question here -> stackoverflow.com/questions/5438589/… –  Wizzard Mar 25 '11 at 22:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your idea is just fine, as the other answerers have already said. Just want to propose a solution that goes even further than David's and something you may want to consider in order to avoid having to add many statements like:

StyleButton(Button1);
StyleButton(Button2);

to each and every form for each and every control you would like to style;

What I would propose is to add a single method call to for example each form's OnShow event:

procedure TForm1.FormShow(Sender: TObject);
begin
  TStyler.StyleForm(Self);
end;

The TStyler could be implemented in a separate unit that looks like this:

interface

type
  TStyler = class;
  TStylerClass = class of TStyler;

  TStyler = class(TObject)
  public
    class procedure StyleForm(const aForm: TCustomForm);
    class procedure StyleControl(const aControl: TControl); virtual;
    class function GetStyler(const aControl: TControl): TStylerClass;
  end;

implementation

uses
  Contnrs;

type
  TButtonStyler = class(TStyler)
  public
    class procedure StyleControl(const aControl: TControl); override;
  end;

  TEditStyler = class(TStyler)
  public
    class procedure StyleControl(const aControl: TControl); override;
  end;

  TLabelStyler = class(TStyler)
  public
    class procedure StyleControl(const aControl: TControl); override;
  end;

var
  _Controls: TClassList;
  _Stylers: TClassList;

{ TStyler }

class function TStyler.GetStyler(const aControl: TControl): TStylerClass;
var
  idx: Integer;
begin
  Result := TStyler;
  idx := _Controls.IndexOf(aControl.ClassType);
  if idx > -1 then
    Result := TStylerClass(_Stylers[idx]);
end;

class procedure TStyler.StyleForm(const aForm: TCustomForm);

  procedure _StyleControl(const aControl: TControl);
  var
    i: Integer;
    StylerClass: TStylerClass;
  begin
    StylerClass := TStyler.GetStyler(aControl);
    StylerClass.StyleControl(aControl);
    if (aControl is TWinControl) then
      for i := 0 to TWinControl(aControl).ControlCount - 1 do
        _StyleControl(TWinControl(aControl).Controls[i]);
  end;

var
  i: Integer;
begin
  _StyleControl(aForm);
end;

class procedure TStyler.StyleControl(const aControl: TControl);
begin
// Do nothing. This is a catch all for all controls that do not need specific styling.
end;

{ TButtonStyler }

class procedure TButtonStyler.StyleControl(const aControl: TControl);
begin
  inherited;
  if aControl is TButton then
  begin
    TButton(aControl).Font.Color := clRed;
    TButton(aControl).Font.Style := [fsBold];
  end;
end;

{ TEditStyler }

class procedure TEditStyler.StyleControl(const aControl: TControl);
begin
  inherited;
  if aControl is TEdit then
  begin
    TEdit(aControl).Color := clGreen;
  end;
end;

{ TLabelStyler }

class procedure TLabelStyler.StyleControl(const aControl: TControl);
begin
  inherited;
  if aControl is TLabel then
  begin
    TLabel(aControl).Font.Color := clPurple;
    TLabel(aControl).Font.Style := [fsItalic];
  end;
end;

initialization
  _Controls := TClassList.Create;
  _Stylers := TClassList.Create;

  _Controls.Add(TButton);
  _Stylers.Add(TButtonStyler);

  _Controls.Add(TEdit);
  _Stylers.Add(TEditStyler);

  _Controls.Add(TLabel);
  _Stylers.Add(TLabelStyler);

finalization
  FreeAndNiL(_Controls);
  FreeAndNiL(_Stylers);
end.

This solution basically employs polymorphism and a registry that links control classes to styler classes. It also uses class procedures and functions to avoid having to instantiate anything.

Please note that the registry is implemented in this example as two lists that need to be kept in sync manually as the code assumes that finding a class at index X will find the styler at the same index in the other list. This can of course be improved upon very much, but is sufficient here to show the concept.

share|improve this answer
    
@David: yes if I had had more than about an hour to whip this up, I would probably also have added recursion... ;) Should be easy enough to add, there is only one method to change and I am sure the OP can do that, but if you give me another half an hour I will as well... No swanky enumerators though, I'll leave that as an exercise to the reader. :-) –  Marjan Venema Mar 25 '11 at 21:19
    
Very nice indeed. I went for a walk and was thinking of something, I will add it as a answer here but one think which could be an issue is if you wanted certain buttons to be styled one way. Eg OK buttons you might want green but cancel buttons you might want Gray. –  Wizzard Mar 25 '11 at 21:42
    
@David: Wanted to do it for myself anyway and a small snag is that you need a TWinControl instead of a TControl to get at the kids and grandkids. (Even though I don't want any !) Thanks for the edit by the way, that was my Dutch-ness shining through... –  Marjan Venema Mar 25 '11 at 21:43
    
@Wizzard: Thanks. The Button thing can be solved by using the "Cancel" property of buttons. And of course there is always the Tag property to distinguish controls of the same class (if you are not already using that for something else). –  Marjan Venema Mar 25 '11 at 21:48
    
@Marjan Yes, TWinControl/TControl, you have to work through that one. You'd be better off without the loop in TStyler.StyleForm and calling _StyleControl(aForm). Why write two loops when one suffices? –  David Heffernan Mar 25 '11 at 21:55

This is an excellent idea. The function will modify whichever object you pass to it.

You are not passing by reference. You are passing by value. The value you are passing is a reference. "Passing by reference" means you'd use the var or out keywords, which are not appropriate in this situation.

share|improve this answer

No, There is no issue (in your specific case) passing a object as parameter

procedure StyleButton(AButton : TButton)

when you do this you are passing a address memory (reference) and setting some properties of the referenced object, so there is not problem.

share|improve this answer

To add to what Rob and RRUZ have already said, you could consider an extra helper using open array parameters:

procedure StyleButtons(const Buttons: array of TButton);
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := low(Buttons) to high(Buttons) do
    StyleButton(Buttons[i]);
end;

You can then call this as:

StyleButtons([btnOK, btnCancel, btnRelease64bitDelphi]);

which is, in my view, more readable at the call-site than:

StyleButton(btnOK);
StyleButton(btnCancel);
StyleButton(btnRelease64bitDelphi);

Note that I passed the open array as a const parameter because that is more efficient when dealing with arrays. Because each element of the array is itself a reference to the button, you are able to modify the actual button. The const just means that you cannot change the reference.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip on using the const for the array, I was thinking of having a method like this to help as well as you've shown it helps a lot. Thanks again. –  Wizzard Mar 25 '11 at 20:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.