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This is by no means essential, but I would like to find out how to create more efficient code, and i'm sure this is far from efficient!

On the form disabled fields values are cleared before the form is saved.

The below code send a message to the user to inform them that they may lose some data if they leave a checkbox unchecked. In the context of the form it all makes sense, i would just like to know a simpler methodology, i'm sure i could use an array somewhere but cant quite figure it out.

Dim couldLoseData As Boolean
Dim msgStr As String

couldLoseData = False

If (Me.chkInvSent = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.invoicedDate)) Then
        couldLoseData = True
        msgStr = "Invoice Sent"
End If
If (Me.chkFeePaid = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.datePaid)) Then
    couldLoseData = True
    If msgStr = "" Then
    msgStr = "Claim Fee Paid"
    Else
    msgStr = msgStr & " / Claim Fee Paid"
    End If
End If
If (Me.chkFeeLodged = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.lodgedDate)) Then
    couldLoseData = True
        If msgStr = "" Then
        msgStr = "Fee Lodged"
        Else
        msgStr = msgStr & " / Fee Lodged"
        End If
End If
If couldLoseData = True Then
    If MsgBox("You will lose data in the following areas as the relevant checkboxes are unticked." & vbNewLine & vbNewLine & _
        msgStr & vbNewLine & vbNewLine & "Do you wish to continue?", vbYesNo, dbNameOf) = vbNo Then
        Cancel = True
    End If
Else
    '
'
'
'   Procedure that gets carried out here

End If

No biggie but if any one could offer me a simpler solution it would be appreciated.

Cheers

Noel

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you think you should be using arrays. When it comes to the msgStr variable logic I would just put in the following:

msgStr = msgStr & "Invoice Sent / "

rather than the five lines of If msgstr = "" Then, etc, etc, End If lines.

Then at the end I would put in the following line

msgStr = lef(msgStr, len(msgStr) - 3) ' remove the trailing /

This then removes the trailing " / "

Purists will tell you that you should never add anything to a string you later remove. I say, so long as you leave a comment there for the next person who is reading your code, this reduces complexity of your preceding lines of code making it much easier to grasp exactly what is going on.

Whenever I'm looking for a value to be returned from a MsgBox I place the string creating in a separate line of code. Thus is much easier to see, at a glance, exactly what the code is doing.

strMsg = "You will lose data in the following areas as the relevant checkboxes are unticked." & vbNewLine & vbNewLine & _
    msgStr & vbNewLine & vbNewLine & "Do you wish to continue?"
If MsgBox(strMsg, vbYesNo, dbNameOf) <> vbYes Then _
    Cancel = True

If I'm only setting one value in the If statement, such as you show, I will also put in the _ and thus not require the End If.

I also prefer <> vbYes just in case something wonky should happen or if someone, not you of course, mucks with the msgbox options.

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Cheers for the tips. I never thought of just removing the final trailing /!! Leaving out the message string makes a lot of sense also. –  noelmcg Mar 28 '11 at 20:30
    
Which reminds me. I'm partial to using <> vbYes. Just in case. I'll edit my response. –  Tony Toews Mar 28 '11 at 21:46
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Why do you even allow the user to close the form when all the data fields have not been filled out?

Basically, to me, your logic is all in the wrong place. If you have a CLOSE button on your form (assuming you've gotten rid of the default Windows CLOSE X), you would not enable it until such time as all the data fields have been filled out appropriately.

The way I usually do this is to write a subroutine (or function) that checks all the fields that have to be filled out and enables the CLOSE button if everything is in order. Thus, the user CAN'T close the form until all the appropriate fields are filled out, except, perhaps, if you've provided a CANCEL button (in which case, you WANT to lose the data).

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cheers for the comment. I do make sure that all required fields are filled in and prompt a user to do so or they cant save a record, or they can cancel. The issue here relates to emptying disabled fields that could have, in the process of a user filling out fields and changing their details, information in them. On save record i empty out all these value, but i need to prompt the user 'just in case' they may lose info that they may not to. May sound a little convoluted but in the context of the form and data it is appropriate, i think! –  noelmcg Mar 28 '11 at 15:23
    
I think you're mis-using Access if you're doing all this in an unbound form, which it sounds like you are. Unbound forms are harder than bound forms -- everything about Access is designed for using unbound forms. You get a whole bunch more form-level events when you use a bound form and those can give you a lot more control over the process than when you have an unbound form. So, in short, I see no good solution to your problems if you choose to go the nonstandard route of using Access in a way that contradicts its fundamental design. –  David-W-Fenton Mar 30 '11 at 20:12
    
its not an unbound form. Im using the checkboxes so that the user has to sequentially fill in sections. E.G Invoice sent -> Fee paid -> Fee Lodged. If the details aren't filled in from the previous section then the user cant move on to the next. Problems can arise if the user goes back to edit items, and may disable fields with data in them. –  noelmcg Mar 30 '11 at 21:47
    
Also if a user would select 'Other' from a drop down menu, the 'describe other' field then gets enabled and filled in. The user then may change their mind to a diff option. the text in the 'describe other' field will be in a disabled box. I would clear the field in the disabled box on the before_update event. Hope my explanations make sense and i'm not barking up the wrong tree with my method of doing things. –  noelmcg Mar 30 '11 at 21:52
    
Some of the fields have to be unbound, otherwise, you'd be losing data when you clear them. I don't understand enough about what you're doing to be able to offer any advice. –  David-W-Fenton Apr 1 '11 at 20:20
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You don't need arrays but a simple helper method to simplify code and make it more reusable:

(just replace checkboxes and conditions in the following code)

Public Function ErrorChecker(assumption As Boolean, errorMessage As String, condition As Boolean, concatenate As Boolean) As String
    Dim ret As String = [String].Empty
    If Not assumption AndAlso condition Then
            If concatenate Then
                ret += " / "
            End If
        ret += errorMessage
    End If
    Return ret
End Function

Private Sub button1_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs)
    Dim message As String = [String].Empty
    message += ErrorChecker(checkBox1.Checked, "Error 1", value1 Is Nothing, False)
    message += ErrorChecker(checkBox2.Checked, "Error 2", value2 Is Nothing, True)
    message += ErrorChecker(checkBox3.Checked, "Error 3", value3 Is Nothing, True)
    If message <> String.Empty Then
            'messagebox
    End If
End Sub
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Did you test this code in VBA? += does not exist. –  Tony Toews Mar 27 '11 at 20:43
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I've written a simple function to concatenate two strings that eliminates the need to worry about whether you need to strip anything off when you're done concatenating. Here's the function:

'-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
' Purpose   : Concatenates two strings
' Usage     : Dim MyList As String
'             MyList = Conc(MyList, SomeValue)
' Notes     : Eliminates the need to strip off the leading/trailing delimiter 
'             when building a string list
'-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Function Conc(StartText As String, NextVal, _
              Optional Delimiter As String = ", ") As String
    If Len(StartText) = 0 Then
        Conc = Nz(NextVal)
    ElseIf Len(CStr(Nz(NextVal))) = 0 Then
        Conc = StartText
    Else
        Conc = StartText & Delimiter & NextVal
    End If
End Function

And here's how I'd rewrite your code using this function:

Dim msgStr As String

If (Me.chkInvSent = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.invoicedDate)) Then
    msgStr = Conc(msgStr, "Invoice Sent", " / ")
End If
If (Me.chkFeePaid = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.datePaid)) Then
    msgStr = Conc(msgStr, "Claim Fee Paid", " / ")
End If
If (Me.chkFeeLodged = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.lodgedDate)) Then
    msgStr = Conc(msgStr, "Fee Lodged", " / ")
End If
If Len(msgStr) > 0 Then
    If MsgBox("You will lose data in the following areas as the relevant checkboxes are unticked." & vbNewLine & vbNewLine & _
        msgStr & vbNewLine & vbNewLine & "Do you wish to continue?", vbYesNo, dbNameOf) <> vbYes Then
        Cancel = True
    End If
Else
    '   Procedure that gets carried out here
End If
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This is how I'd code it up

Dim couldLoseData As Boolean
Dim msgStr As String
Dim InvBoolean as boolean
Dim PaidBoolean as boolean
Dim LodgedBoolean as boolean
Dim response as integer

couldLoseData = False

InvBoolean = (Me.chkInvSent = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.invoicedDate))
PaidBoolean = (Me.chkFeePaid = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.datePaid))
LodgedBoolean = (Me.chkFeeLodged = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.lodgedDate))

couldLoseData = InvBoolean or PaidBoolean or LodgeBoolean
'if any one is true, there could be lost data.

if couldLoseData = false then
    exit sub 'bail if nothing applies
    'you may want a GOTO if there is stuff this sub needs to do regardless
end if

If InvBoolean = true then 'add phrase and move to new line
    msgStr = msgStr & "Invoice Sent" & vbcrlf
end if

If PaidBoolean = true then 'add phrase and move to new line
    msgStr = msgStr & "Claim Fee Paid" & vbcrlf
end if

If LodgedBoolean = true then 'add phrase and move to new line
    msgStr = msgStr & "Fee Lodged" & vbcrlf
end if


If couldLoseData = True Then
    msgStr = "You will lose data in the following areas as the relevant checkboxes are unticked." & vbcrlf & msgStr & vbcrlf
    msgStr = msgStr & "Do you wish to continue?"
    response = msgbox(msgstr, vbYesNo)
    if response = vbno then
        Cancel = True
    End If
end if
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If you really were looking to use an array:

Dim couldLoseData As Boolean
Dim msgStr As String
Dim ConditionsResponses(0 to 2,1)
Dim x as integer
Dim response as integer

couldLoseData = False

ConditionsResponses(0,0) = (Me.chkInvSent = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.invoicedDate))
ConditionsResponses(1,0) = (Me.chkFeePaid = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.datePaid))
ConditionsResponses(2,0) = (Me.chkFeeLodged = False) And (Not IsNull(Me.lodgedDate))

ConditionsResponses(0,1) = "Invoice Sent" & vbcrlf
ConditionsResponses(1,1) = "Claim Fee Paid" & vbcrlf
ConditionsResponses(2,1) = "Fee Lodged" & vbcrlf


couldLoseData = ConditionsResponses(0,0) or ConditionsResponses(0,0) or ConditionsResponses(0,0)
'if any one is true, there could be lost data.

for x = 0 to 2
    if ConditionsResponses(x,0)= true then
    msgStr = msgStr & ConditionsResponses(x,1)
    end if
next x

If couldLoseData = True Then
    msgStr = "You will lose data in the following areas as the relevant checkboxes are unticked." & vbcrlf & msgStr & vbcrlf
    msgStr = msgStr & "Do you wish to continue?"
    response = msgbox(msgstr, vbYesNo)
    if response = vbno then
        Cancel = True
    End If
end if
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