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I'm drawing 2 squares next to each other with glColor3f() and GL_QUAD_STRIP, but it seems that they are fading the colors between the 2 squares, is there any way to prevent this? Or is GL_QUAD_STRIP simply not meant for this kind of thing? More appropriate would be GL_QUADS, but that makes it too easy.

glBegin(GL_QUAD_STRIP);

glColor3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f);
glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
glColor3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(2.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(2.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
glColor3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f);

glEnd();
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Post your code. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 26 '11 at 4:18
    
You should post a screenshot. –  Matias Valdenegro Apr 10 '11 at 18:17
    
What is your GL version, btw ? –  Bahbar Apr 14 '11 at 11:01
    
I'm using freeglut 2.6.0 –  atx Apr 15 '11 at 5:10
    
err... freeglut is not your GL version. It's just a utility toolkit. –  Bahbar Apr 15 '11 at 7:03
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

In general, the colors are attached to each vertex, not each quad. So since 2 vertices are shared between the 2 quads of your strip, you get the color used for both (and the "fading" you're observing. It's called interpolation).

Now, in your particular case, there exists however an OpenGL mode that helps: You can tell OpenGL to not interpolate the colors at all, and only get the color of the last vertex of each primitive (here quads) for the full primitive.

This is done with the following state:

glShadeModel(GL_FLAT);
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Thanks, this didn't work for my code though. I placed it before glBegin() and it still caused the jagged edges. –  atx Mar 27 '11 at 3:15
    
@maify: Then you need to provide more data on how you render. (and if OpenGL has any errors with glGetError). –  Bahbar Mar 27 '11 at 9:02
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Each time you make a glColor3f call, it will associate that color with each vertex until you make a different glColor3f call call with a different color. I would use GL_QUADS and break it down into two separate quads like this (clockwise order, I believe):

glBegin(GL_QUADS);

glColor3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f);
glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);

glColor3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(2.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
glVertex3f(2.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);

glEnd();
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