Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a pretty short, simple and straightforward code I wrote to use for my site to log users in. I was hoping someone could check it out and tell me whether there's anything wrong with it what could use some improvement.

Thanks in advance!

session_start();

/* connect to the db */
define("INCLUDED-PUBLIC", true);
include('dbConnection.php');   

/* define safe variables */
$login = mysqli_real_escape_string($connection, $_POST['login-email']);
$pass = md5($_POST['login-pass']);

/* send the query */
$query = mysqli_query($connection, "
  SELECT `user_id`
    FROM `users`
   WHERE `user_contact_email`='$login'
     AND `user_password`='$pass'
   LIMIT 1
");

/* does such account exist? */
$count = mysqli_num_rows($query);

if ($count > 0){

   /* user exists, loggin' in! */
   $data = mysqli_fetch_array($query);
   $userID = $data['user_id'];
   $_SESSION['user']['user_id'] = $userID;

}
share|improve this question
    
unless your trying to protect a bank account it should be adequate –  Dagon Mar 26 '11 at 4:26
    
Why use LIMIT 1? That would allow duplicates to get through, for what should only return one row anyways -- entirely useless. –  OMG Ponies Mar 26 '11 at 4:28
3  
if only wanting one row using limit 1 speeds up the query by stopping on the first match, generally recommended –  Dagon Mar 26 '11 at 4:30
2  
@Dagon Mysql is not that dumb. If table is properly indexed, the search will be stopped anyway. And darn indexing IS the thing that speeds up the search, not some lame tricks –  Your Common Sense Mar 26 '11 at 6:40
1  
@Dagon learn indexes, dude. For such case an index should be used, not lame LIMIT trick –  Your Common Sense Mar 26 '11 at 10:24
show 6 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Actually, there is quite some room for improvement.

First: You should add a random salt to the hashing algorithm as to protect against pre-computation attacks. (search for rainbow table)

Second: you should fetch the user_password value from the DB and do the comparison on the PHP side.

Important

Statements that invoke PASSWORD() may be recorded in server logs or in a history file such as ~/.mysql_history, which means that passwords may be read by anyone having read access to that information. See Section 5.3.2, “Password Security in MySQL”.

Source: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/encryption-functions.html#function_password

Third: Do not use MD5 it's a nice hashing algorithm but considered broken for security purposes. If you use PHP 5.3 or later, use crypt, with CRYPT_BLOWFISH.
CRYPT_BLOWFISH in PHP is an implementation of the Bcrypt hash. Bcrypt is based on the Blowfish block cipher, making use of it's expensive key setup to slow the algorithm down.

Also: don't use LIMIT in your query, instead put a UNIQUE constraint on the user_contact_email. Using LIMIT is a trick that could mask duplicate user-emails and cause unexpected results when a duplicate email somehow gets entered.

And finally: Why don't you use a standard library.
Security tends to be a lot more complicated and with more invisible screw up possibilities than most programmers could tackle alone, using a standard library is almost always easiest and most (if not the only) secure option available. (also read: Help me make my password storage safe)

share|improve this answer
add comment

The only thing i would change would be:

$pass = md5($_POST['login-pass']);

To something like:

$pass = hash('whirlpool', $_POST['login-pass']);

And also change how it is stored in the database on registration.

Other than that, its all good.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please clarify why your solution is better and how exactly? I'm not saying it isn't, I just want to know the details. Thanks! –  Richard Rodriguez Mar 26 '11 at 5:17
2  
@rimmer, md5 is considered broken. sha1 is also effectively broken thanks to the new generation of powerful GPUs. You'll want to use a more effective hashing mechanism, and a salt. –  Charles Mar 26 '11 at 5:25
    
I believe it is better because MD5 is not as secure as whirlpool for hashing. You could alternatively use sha256, ripemd160, etc. You can read more about it at wikipedia Edit: Yea, and a salt like Charles said. –  Brent Mar 26 '11 at 5:30
    
@Charles nothing is really broken in terms of password security. The only things you need is some salt and password strongness. The latter is the only thing that really matters in practice, not in theory (ans always forgotten by everyone), while with weak password no super-hash nor extra-salt will help. –  Your Common Sense Mar 26 '11 at 6:32
1  
@Col, password strength is irrelevant if it's possible to whip up a collision with the hashed password in an economical fashion. TBH, the entire password discussion is silly. There are so many factors that can screw something up that we constantly have to step all over ourselves just to try and explain the whole picture: If someone manages to grab your user database to begin with, you're screwed ten ways from sunday no matter what password scheme you use! (Even if you have the best password scheme in the world, you've lost the trust of your users, and I'd argue that is more valuable.) –  Charles Mar 26 '11 at 6:47
show 6 more comments

Things to changes

  • include shoud change into require_once
  • check that password and email are not empty
  • you also check for valid email but invalid password
  • free the result set after storing into session
  • close the mysqli connection
  • if user/email is invalid than send back

my way:

session_start();



require_once('dbConnection.php');
/* connect to the db */
define("INCLUDED-PUBLIC", true);


/* define safe variables */
if(!empty($_POST['login-pass']) && !empty($_POST['login-email']) )
{
    $login = mysqli_real_escape_string($connection, $_POST['login-email']);
    $pass = md5($_POST['login-pass']);

    /* send the query */
    $query = mysqli_query($connection, "
      SELECT `user_id`
        FROM `users`
       WHERE `user_contact_email`='$login'
            AND `user_password`='$pass'
        LIMIT 1
    ");

    /* does such account exist? */
    $count = mysqli_num_rows($query);

    if ($count > 0){
       /* user exists, loggin' in! */
       $data = mysqli_fetch_array($query);
       $_SESSION['user']['user_id'] = $data['user_id'];        
       /* free result set */
       mysqli_free_result($query);
       mysqli_close($connection);
    }
    else {
            header("location:login.php");
            exit();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
From PHP manual, "Using mysql_close() isn't usually necessary, as non-persistent open links are automatically closed at the end of the script's execution." So this doesn't apply? –  Richard Rodriguez Mar 26 '11 at 5:33
    
Also, "mysql_free_result() only needs to be called if you are concerned about how much memory is being used for queries that return large result sets. All associated result memory is automatically freed at the end of the script's execution." –  Richard Rodriguez Mar 26 '11 at 5:34
    
@RiMMER if mysqli_close() is not necessary then why this function exists?? same thing for mysqli_free_result(). please refer php Manual regadring that –  diEcho Mar 26 '11 at 5:38
    
may be for some reason inapplicable in this case? –  Your Common Sense Mar 26 '11 at 6:46
    
so downvoted?? is this fair –  diEcho Mar 26 '11 at 6:49
show 3 more comments

In general your code is okay, only minor improvements can be made.

  • counting rows is unnecessary, fetching array will do the same with shorter code.
  • some error handling is required. You have to check query result and raise an error if it fails
  • code structure and readability.
    Writing readable code lets you omit obvious comments. include('dbConnection.php'); is self-explanatory, isn't it?
    $query variable in your code doesn't contain query, but rather query result. So, you're obfuscating your own code, making it less readable. Always use sensible names, it will save you useless comments.

like this

define("INCLUDED-PUBLIC", true);
include('dbConnection.php');   
$login = mysqli_real_escape_string($connection, $_POST['login-email']);
$pass  = md5($_POST['login-pass']);

$query = "SELECT `user_id` FROM `users` WHERE `user_contact_email`='$login'
                                               AND `user_password`='$pass'";

$result = mysqli_query($connection, $query);
if (!$result) trigger_error(mysqli_error($connection).$query);

if ($data = mysqli_fetch_array($query)){
   session_start();
   $_SESSION['user']['user_id'] = $data['user_id'];
}

However, there are some conceptual improvements can be made

  • It's always preferred to use placeholders to insert data into query.
  • password salting. that's long and obscure story, everyone gets impressed with it and almost noone understands the matter. But it can be boiled down to just simple thing:
    have site specific salt, defined in your dbconnect file, and salt your password with it and user's email. It won't help if the password is weak, but will help if passwords is strong.
  • Having some library to ease database calls is a must:

compare your code to this one:

define("INCLUDED-PUBLIC", true);
include('dbConnection.php');   
$pass  = md5(SITE_SALT.$_POST['login-email'].$_POST['login-pass']);
$query = "SELECT `user_id` FROM `users` WHERE `user_contact_email`=? AND `user_password`=?";
$data  = dbgetone($query, $_POST['login-email'],$pass);
if ($data){
   session_start();
   $_SESSION['user']['user_id'] = $data['user_id'];
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.