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As I mentioned in another question I've been teaching myself C out of of K.N King's C Programming: A Modern Approach (2ndEdn).

I'm enjoying it, but am hoping to post the odd question here for advice if appropriate because unfortunately I don't have a tutor and some bits raise more questions then they answer!

I'm up to a question that asks me to write a program that finds the largest and smallest of four integers entered by the user... I've come up with a way to find the largest, but for the life of me can't work out how to get the smallest out. The question says that four if statements should be sufficient. Math is not my forte, I'd appreciate any advice!

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{

    int one, two, three, four;

    printf("Enter four integers: ");

    scanf("%d %d %d %d", &one, &two, &three, &four);

    if (four > three && four > two && four > one)
            printf("Largest: %d", four);
    else if (three > four && three > two && three > one)
            printf("Largest: %d", three);
    else if (two > three && two > four && two > one)
            printf("Largest: %d", two);
    else
            printf("Largest: %d", one);

    return 0;

}

I'm trying to keep it simple, as I'm only up to chapter 5 of 27!

Cheers Andrew

share|improve this question
    
Consider what happens if the user enters 2,2,1,1. –  freespace Mar 26 '11 at 9:11
    
I guess it never makes it to the second 2, nor the next two 1's? After evaluation of the first if statement to true it just prints the largest integer is two and exits? –  aussie_aj Mar 26 '11 at 9:21
    
Ops, I meant "1 1 2 2". Put that into your program and see what happens. –  freespace Mar 26 '11 at 9:52
    
Ahhh Ok. Nice pickup. So the first two if statements fail because 2 is not bigger than two, and it has no choice but to call 1 the largest int. I have changed it to >= instead of just > and this seems to have corrected the issue, does that seem the right way to fix to you? –  aussie_aj Mar 26 '11 at 10:19
    
@aussie_aj well done :) That should fix it :) –  freespace Mar 26 '11 at 10:27

7 Answers 7

I managed to solve this problem in even fewer than 4 if statements, here is my solution:

    `#include<stdio.h>

    int main(void){
    int no1, no2, no3, no4;
    int max1, max2, max3, min1, min2, min3;

    printf("Enter four integers:");
    scanf_s("%d %d %d %d", &no1, &no2, &no3, &no4);

    if(no1 > no2 || no1 < no2 && no3 > no4 || no3 < no4){
        no1 > no2 ? (max1=no1) : (max1=no2);
        no1 > no2 ? (min1=no2) : (min1=no1);
        no3 > no4 ? (max2=no3) : (max2=no4);
        no3 > no4 ? (min2=no4) : (min2=no3);
    }
    if(max1 > max2 || max1 < max2 && min1 > min2 || min1 < min2){
        max1 > max2 ? (max3=max1) : (max3=max2);
        min1 > min2 ? (min3=min2) : (min3=min1);
    }

    printf("The largest number is %d \n", max3);
    printf("The smallest number is %d \n", min3);
    }`

Howewer I dont know if I am doing the right things. At least I think it will help someone :)

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>
/*
SOLUTION 1

int main(void) {
    int a1,a2,a3,a4,max,min,max1,min1,max2,min2;
    printf("Enter four integers : ");
    scanf("%d %d %d %d",&a1,&a2,&a3,&a4);
    if (a1 > a2) {
        max1 = a1;
        min1 = a2;
    } else {
        max1 = a2;
        min1 = a1;
    }
    if (a3 > a4) {
        max2 = a3;
        min2 = a4;
    } else {
        max2 = a4;
        min2 = a3;
    }
    if (max1 > max2)
        max = max1;
    else
        max = max2;
    if (min1 < min2)
        min = min1;
    else
        min = min2;
    printf("Largest : %d\n",max);
    printf("Smallest : %d\n",min);
}
*/

/*
SOLUTION 2
*/

int main(void) {
    int a1,a2,a3,a4;
    printf("Enter four integers : ");
    scanf("%d %d %d %d",&a1,&a2,&a3,&a4);
    if (a1 > a2) {
        int temp1 = a1; a1 = a2; a2 = temp1; // Swap the numbers (a1 to contain smallest number)
    }
    if (a3 > a4) {
        int temp2 = a3; a3 = a4; a4 = temp2; // Swap the numbers (a1 to contain smallest number)
    }
    if (a1 > a3) {
        int temp3 = a1; a1 = a3; a3 = temp3; // Swap the numbers (a1 to contain smallest number)
    }
    if (a2 > a4) {
        int temp4 = a2; a2 = a4; a4 = temp4; // Swap the numbers (a1 to contain smallest number)    
    }
    printf("Largest : %d\n",a4);
    printf("Smallest : %d\n",a1);
}
share|improve this answer

I'm going through K.N. King's "C Programming: A Modern Approach, Second Edition" too. Below is my solution for this thread's original question.

Note that I'm using only C concepts introduced up through Chapter 5 of the book. The original programming problem comes from Chapter 5, Programming Problem 7.

 21 #include <stdio.h>
 22 
 23 int main(void)
 24 {
 25     int i1, i2, i3, i4, large_1, small_1, large_2, small_2,
 26         largest, smallest;
 27 
 28     printf("\nEnter four integers: ");
 29     scanf("%d %d %d %d", &i1, &i2, &i3, &i4);
 30 
 31     if (i1 < i2) {
 32         small_1 = i1;
 33         large_1 = i2;
 34     } else {
 35         small_1 = i2;
 36         large_1 = i1;
 37     }
 38 
 39     if (i3 < i4) {
 40         small_2 = i3;
 41         large_2 = i4;
 42     } else {
 43         small_2 = i4;
 44         large_2 = i3;
 45     }
 46 
 47     if (large_1 < large_2)
 48         largest = large_2;
 49     else
 50         largest = large_1;
 51 
 52     if (small_1 < small_2)
 53         smallest = small_1;
 54     else
 55         smallest = small_2;
 56 
 57     printf("Largest: %d\n", largest);
 58     printf("Smallest: %d\n\n", smallest);
 59 
 60     return 0;
 61 }
share|improve this answer

I have that same book, and I'll admit it, that program gave me quite a headache. It's a little tricky for a beginner programmer.

First, you compare the first pair of integers (a and b in the code), and store local min and max somewhere. Do the same thing with the second pair. Then compare local minimums to get the global minimum, and do the same thing with maximums. No more than four if's.

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
   int a, b, c, d, min1, max1, min2, max2, min, max;
   scanf ("%d %d %d %d", &a, &b, &c, &d);
   if (a > b) 
   {
      max1 = a;
      min1 = b;
   }
   else 
   {
      max1 = b; 
      min1 = a;
   }
   if (c > d) 
   {
      max2 = c;
      min2 = d;
   }
   else 
   {
      max2 = d;
      min2 = c;
   }
   if (min1 < min2) min = min1;
   else min = min2;
   if (max1 > max2) max = max1;
   else max = max2;
   printf ("%d %d", max, min);
   return 0;
}

There are better ways to solve this, some of them are shown here, but the book covers them in the later chapters.

share|improve this answer
printf("Largest: %d\n",(one>two ? one:two)>(three>four ? three:four)
                ? (one>two ? one:two):(three>four ? three:four));
printf("Smallest: %d",(one<two ? one:two)<(three<four ? three:four)
                ? (one<two ? one:two):(three<four ? three:four));
share|improve this answer
    
That's called confusing code. –  xiaomao Oct 27 '12 at 0:14
if (first > second)
    swap(&first, &second);
if (third > fourth)
    swap(&third, &fourth);
if (first > third)
    swap(&first, &third);
if (second > fourth)
    swap(&second, &fourth);

printf("Smallest: %d\n", first);
printf("Largest: %d\n", fourth);

The implementation of the swap() function is left as exercise.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Very elegant. Hadn't thought of that. –  quasiverse Mar 26 '11 at 9:24
    
Just reading on the swap function now and working my way through this, how did you come up with this it's amazing! –  aussie_aj Mar 26 '11 at 9:49
    
I just used divide and conquer strategy. –  mgronber Mar 26 '11 at 10:06

another way would be as such:

int one, two, three, four;
//Assign values to the four variables;
int largest, smallest;
largest = max(max(max(one, two), three), four);
smallest = min(min(min(one, two), three), four);

Not a single if statement needed ;)

share|improve this answer
2  
You do realise he's not writing the code to be fast or concise but to learn the language features. –  quasiverse Mar 26 '11 at 9:14
    
I do. And while I recognise that my answer is a bit more complex, I figured I'd submit it to deliver the point that there is more than 1 solution for any given problem. Also, its a relatively easy to understand, if not trivial, example of function chaining. –  Jordaan Mylonas Mar 26 '11 at 9:24
1  
I never said it was hard to understand but don't you think it's probable that if he's learning if statements that he wouldn't know about functions or chaining? –  quasiverse Mar 26 '11 at 9:26

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