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I'm having trouble converting especially the getter and setter.

public class CartItem : IEquatable<CartItem>
    {
        #region Attributes

        public int Quantity { get; set; }

        private int _productId;
        public int ProductId
        {
            get { return _productId; }
            set
            {
                _product = null;
                _productId = value;
            }
        }


        private Product _product = null;
        public Product Prod
        {
            get
            {
                if (_product == null)
                {
                    _product = new Product(ProductId);
                }
                return _product;
            }
        }
        public string Name
        {
            get { return Prod.ProductName; }
        }

        public string Description
        {
            get { return Prod.Description; }
        }

        public float UnitPrice
        {
            get { return Prod.UnitPrice; }
        }

        public float TotalPrice
        {
            get { return UnitPrice * Quantity; }
        }

        #endregion

        #region Methods
        public CartItem(int productId)
        {
            this.ProductId = productId;
        }


        public bool Equals(CartItem item)
        {
            return item.ProductId == this.ProductId;
        }

        #endregion
    }
share|improve this question
    
I made little update to my answer –  dantuch Mar 26 '11 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

sample of getters and setters in Java:

public class Employee {
    private int empId;
    private String name;
    private int age;

    public Employee(int empId, String name, int age) {
        this.empId = empId;
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
    }

    // getters & setters

    public int getEmpId() {
        return empId;
    }

    public void setEmpId(int empId) {
        this.empId = empId;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
}

using your code:

public class Sample {

    private int _productId;

    public int get_productId() {
        return _productId;
    }

    public void set_productId(int productId) {
        _productId = productId;
    }

    private Product _product = null;

    public Product get_product() {
        if (_product == null) {
            _product = new Product();
        }
        return _product;
    }

    public void set_product(Product product) {
        _product = product;
    }

}

and something more:

public class Product {

    String desription;

    public String getDesription() {
        return desription;
    }

    public void setDesription(String desription) {
        this.desription = desription;
    }
}


//this is your hidding delegation getter only in main class (Sample in my samples)
public String getDescription(){
    return _product.getDesription();
}
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Java getters and setters aren't as easy to use as C#'s. In Java, every getter and setter has to be explicitly defined, rather than using the shorthand you have there.

For example, for your code "public int ProductId", you would need a line defining the variable, in addition two methods (a getter and setter) as follows:

private int _productId;
public void setProductId(int anId)
{
   _productId = anId;
}

public int getProductId()
{
   return _productId;
}

You'd need to define similar variable declarations and getter/setter methods for each variable you have.

share|improve this answer
    
"Java getters and setters aren't as easy to use as C#'s." - Whats the difficulty in using Java getters and setters? Can you eloborate on the sentence? –  ivorykoder Aug 2 '11 at 10:52

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