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I have a std::list of Points (that simply store an x, y). Each one of these points represents a polygon, which I later draw.

class Point {
public:
    int x, y;
    Point(int x1, int y1)
    {
        x = x1;
        y = y1;
    }
};

std::list <Point> currentPolygon;

I would like to have a list of these polygons (lists themselves).

Is this possible? How do I have a std::list of a list of Points (so I can store more than one polygon).

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could use this:

std::list< std::list<Point> > polygons;

To make things easier, use typedefs.

class Point {
public:
    int x, y;
    Point(int x1, int y1)
    {
        x = x1;
        y = y1;
    }
};
typedef std::list<Point> PolygonType;
typedef std::list<PolygonType> PolygonsType;
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don't forget the space between > and > in std::list<std::list<Point> >, or the parser would think you want to do a right shift and complain. –  Calyth Feb 13 '09 at 0:56
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It sure is. But what you probably want - for expandability purposes later - create a second class - "polygon", that holds a list of points. Then use a list of polygons.

EDIT: I'm no C++ programmer, so I'm sure an implementation like j_random_hacker's response is better if you're needing this for a real project. I merely wanted to give a quickie code example of this design.

class Point {
public:
    int x, y;
    Point(int x1, int y1)
    {
        x = x1;
        y = y1;
    }
};

class Polygon {
public:
    std::list <Point> currentPolygon;
    Polygon(std::list <Point> p1)
    {
        currentPolygon = p1
    }
};
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std:list overloads the assignment operator so yes that will work. –  Kevin Loney Feb 13 '09 at 0:43
    
Sweet... I've been living too long in the .net arraylist and hashtable world. –  Jeffrey Feb 13 '09 at 0:44
    
Basically OK but I'm -1ing you since you're employing several bad habits: (1) You should declare your Polygon ctor "explicit" to avoid implicit conversions from list<Point>; (2) pass p1 by const ref to the ctor; (3) Point and Polygon ctors should both initialise members using an initialiser list. –  j_random_hacker Feb 13 '09 at 4:06
    
Sounds fair enough. Feel free to edit if the link isn't sufficient enough. I see you have the rep ;-) –  Jeffrey Feb 13 '09 at 4:23
    
@Jeffrey: Thanks for that. I prefer not to edit others' answers to change the meaning of what they wrote, I just fix typos etc. (And insert the odd "j_random_hacker RULZ!!!11!1" :-P) –  j_random_hacker Feb 13 '09 at 8:00
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Here is Jeffrey's code again, tidied up slightly to fix what I was whingeing about in the comments :)

class Point {
public:
    int x, y;
    Point(int x1, int y1) : x(x1), y(y1)
    {
    }
};

class Polygon {
public:
    std::list <Point> currentPolygon;    // Consider making this private.
    explicit Polygon(std::list <Point> const& p1) : currentPolygon(p1)
    {
    }
};

[EDIT: Thanks to Matt Davis for pointing out that the user-defined copy constructor I provided was unnecessary, which simplifies things.]

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Unless I'm not remembering the Scott Meyers "Effective C++" correctly, the compiler provides the copy constructor as well. –  Matt Davis Feb 13 '09 at 5:59
    
@Matt Davis: You're right, I've now fixed this. (For some reason I thought maybe compiler auto-generation of copy ctors might be turned off by providing any 1-parameter ctor of your own, but of course that parameter has to be a (possibly const and/or volatile) reference to the class's own type.) –  j_random_hacker Feb 13 '09 at 7:35
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