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When I inherit from a class and serialize the new class I get all all properties. How can I prevent that? I have no control over the class that I inherit from. So I can't add attributes to it's properties (XmlIgnore).

Example

class A 
{
    public string PropertyA {get;set;}
}

class B:A
{
    public string PropertyB {get;set;}
}

When I serialize a object with the type of B then I get both PropertyA and PropertyB and I only want PropertyB

Xml serialization I use

Type t = serObj.GetType();
XmlSerializer xser = new XmlSerializer(t);
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
StringWriter sw = new StringWriter(sb);

xser.Serialize(sw, serObj);
string xml = sw.ToString();
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If B inherits from A, it inherits PropertyA, and there's nothing you can do about it. If you don't want to serialize PropertyA when serializing an instance of B, perhaps you shouldn't be inheriting A in the first place...

Anyway, I don't think XML serialization can help you with what you're trying to do, unless you implement IXmlSerializable yourself...

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Ended up implementing ISerializeable. In WriteXml I itterate through the properties and check what DeclaringType it has and only outputs the ones that don't have the type "A". Thanks. Added WriteXml in a answer. –  Andreas Mar 26 '11 at 15:03
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One solution is to use the [Nonserialized] attribute on PropertyA. Note that with this attribute, PropertyA will never be serialized, including when you serialize an instance of class A. Is that acceptable?

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I should probably had said that I have no control over class A. Will add that to question :) –  Andreas Mar 26 '11 at 13:54
    
NonSerialized has nothing to do with XML serialization... it is used by formatters like BinaryFormatter (binary serialization) –  Thomas Levesque Mar 26 '11 at 13:54
    
If I remember, [XmlIgnore] is the attribute that accomplishes this, although that doesn't help the OP since the base class is not under control. –  Joe Enos Mar 26 '11 at 14:04
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This was the solution I came up with.

        public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
        {
            foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in this.GetType().GetProperties())
            {
                string name = propertyInfo.Name;

                if (propertyInfo.DeclaringType != typeof(A))
                {
                    object obj = propertyInfo.GetValue(this, null);

                    if (obj != null)
                    {
                        writer.WriteStartElement(name);
                        string value = obj.ToString();
                        writer.WriteValue(value);
                        writer.WriteEndElement();
                    }
                }
            }
        }
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