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In the Python multiprocessing library, is there a variant of pool.map which support multiple arguments?

text = "test"
def harvester(text, case):
    X = case[0]
    text+ str(X)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes=6)
    case = RAW_DATASET
    pool.map(harvester(text,case),case, 1)
    pool.close()
    pool.join()
share|improve this question
1  
To my surprise, I could make neither partial nor lambda do this. I think it has to do with the strange way that functions are passed to the subprocesses (via pickle). –  senderle Mar 26 '11 at 15:27
3  
@senderle: This is a bug in Python 2.6, but has been fixed as of 2.7: bugs.python.org/issue5228 –  unutbu Mar 26 '11 at 16:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

My initial thought was to use partial, and as J.F. Sebastian indicated, partial works in this instance in Python >=2.7, so I am posting this, with the caveat that it won't work in 2.6.

Also note that in the above code, you're passing the result of harvester(text, case) instead of the function harvester itself. Also, you aren't returning anything; you'll have to return something in order for this to be useful.

I'm assuming that text is the variable that should be mapped, while case supplies the mapping function with extra information about the whole sequence. This simply maps each element in case to case[i] + case[0]. That's a bit different from what you did, but I find this example clearer:

from functools import partial

def harvester(text, case):
    X = case[0]
    return text + str(X)

partial_harvester = partial(harvester, case=RAW_DATASET)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes=6)
    case_data = RAW_DATASET
    pool.map(partial_harvester, case_data, 1)
    pool.close()
    pool.join()

J.F. Sebastian's answer is more general because it allows you to specify unique arguments for every call. But using partial is simpler when one of the arguments stays the same for all calls.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems to me that RAW_DATASET in this case should be a global variable? While I want the partial_harvester change the value of case in every call of harvester(). How to achieve that? –  xgdgsc Sep 2 '13 at 2:36
    
@xgdgsc I just used RAW_DATASET the way the OP did; it does seem to be a global. I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "change the value of case in every call" -- you should probably search for a question that is closer to your problem or ask a new one. –  senderle Sep 2 '13 at 13:09

is there a variant of pool.map which support multiple arguments?

Python 3.3 includes pool.starmap() method.

For older versions:

import itertools
from multiprocessing import Pool, freeze_support

def func(a, b):
    print a, b

def func_star(a_b):
    """Convert `f([1,2])` to `f(1,2)` call."""
    return func(*a_b)

def main():
    pool = Pool()
    a_args = [1,2,3]
    second_arg = 1
    pool.map(func_star, itertools.izip(a_args, itertools.repeat(second_arg)))

if __name__=="__main__":
    freeze_support()
    main()

Output

1 1
2 1
3 1

Notice how itertools.izip() and itertools.repeat() are used here.

Due to the bug mentioned by @unutbu you can't use functools.partial() or similar capabilities on Python 2.6, so the simple wrapper function func_star() should be defined explicitly. See also the workaround suggested by uptimebox.

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+1, thanks for explaining that bug. –  senderle Mar 26 '11 at 18:33
1  
F.: You can unpack the argument tuple in the signature of func_star like this: def func_star((a, b)). Of course, this only works for a fixed number of arguments, but if that is the only case he has, it is more readable. –  Björn Pollex Mar 26 '11 at 21:01
1  
@Space_C0wb0y: f((a,b)) syntax is deprecated and removed in py3k. And it is unnecessary here. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 26 '11 at 21:31
    
F.: I did not know that it was deprecated, thanks! –  Björn Pollex Mar 26 '11 at 21:33
1  
@BjörnPollex python.org/dev/peps/pep-3113 –  dbr Jan 5 '12 at 3:52

Having learnt about itertools in J.F. Sebastian answer I decided to take it a step further and write a parmap package that takes care about parallelization, offering map and starmap functions on python-2.7 and python-3.2 (and later also) that can take any number of positional arguments.

Installation

pip install parmap

How to parallelize:

import parmap
# If you want to do:
y = [myfunction(x, argument1, argument2) for x in mylist]
# In parallel:
y = parmap.map(myfunction, mylist, argument1, argument2)

# If you want to do:
z = [myfunction(x, y, argument1, argument2) for (x,y) in mylist]
# In parallel:
z = parmap.starmap(myfunction, mylist, argument1, argument2)

# If you want to do:
listx = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
listy = [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
param = 3.14
param2 = 42
listz = []
for (x, y) in zip(listx, listy):
        listz.append(myfunction(x, y, param1, param2))
# In parallel:
listz = parmap.starmap(myfunction, zip(listx, listy), param1, param2)

I have uploaded parmap to PyPI and to a github repository.

As an example, the question can be answered as follows:

import parmap

def harvester(case, text):
    X = case[0]
    text+ str(X)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    case = RAW_DATASET  # assuming this is an iterable
    parmap.map(harvester, case, "test", chunksize=1)
share|improve this answer

I think the below will be better

def multi_run_wrapper(args):
   return add(*args)
def add(x,y):
    return x+y
if __name__ == "__main__":
    from multiprocessing import Pool
    pool = Pool(4)
    results = pool.map(multi_run_wrapper,[(1,2),(2,3),(3,4)])
    print results

output

[3, 5, 7]
share|improve this answer

There's a fork of multiprocessing called pathos (note: use the version on github) that doesn't need starmap -- the map functions mirror the API for python's map, thus map can take multiple arguments. With pathos, you can also generally do multiprocessing in the interpreter, instead of being stuck in the __main__ block. Pathos is due for a release, after some mild updating -- mostly conversion to python 3.x.

  Python 2.7.5 (default, Sep 30 2013, 20:15:49) 
  [GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5566)] on darwin
  Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
  >>> def func(a,b):
  ...     print a,b
  ...
  >>>
  >>> from pathos.multiprocessing import ProcessingPool    
  >>> pool = ProcessingPool(nodes=4)
  >>> pool.map(func, [1,2,3], [1,1,1])
  1 1
  2 1
  3 1
  [None, None, None]
  >>>
  >>> # also can pickle stuff like lambdas 
  >>> result = pool.map(lambda x: x**2, range(10))
  >>> result
  [0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81]
  >>>
  >>> # also does asynchronous map
  >>> result = pool.amap(pow, [1,2,3], [4,5,6])
  >>> result.get()
  [1, 32, 729]
  >>>
  >>> # or can return a map iterator
  >>> result = pool.imap(pow, [1,2,3], [4,5,6])
  >>> result
  <processing.pool.IMapIterator object at 0x110c2ffd0>
  >>> list(result)
  [1, 32, 729]
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Another way is to pass a list of lists to a one-argument routine:

import os
from multiprocessing import Pool

def task(args):
    print "PID =", os.getpid(), ", arg1 =", args[0], ", arg2 =", args[1]

pool = Pool()

pool.map(task, [
        [1,2],
        [3,4],
        [5,6],
        [7,8]
    ])

One can than construct a list lists of arguments with one's favorite method.

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You can use the following two functions so as to avoid writing a wrapper for each new function:

import itertools
from multiprocessing import Pool

def universal_worker(input_pair):
    function, args = input_pair
    return function(*args)

def pool_args(function, *args):
    return zip(itertools.repeat(function), zip(*args))

Use the function function with the lists of arguments arg_0, arg_1 and arg_2 as follows:

pool = Pool(n_core)
list_model = pool.map(universal_worker, pool_args(function, arg_0, arg_1, arg_2)
pool.close()
pool.join()
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