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I just realized that my exceptions are not being shown to the user in my threads!

At first I used this in my thread for raising the exception, which does not work:

except on E:Exception do
begin
  raise Exception.Create('Error: ' + E.Message);
end;

The IDE shows me the exceptions, but my app does not!

I have looked around for a solution, this is what I found:

Delphi thread exception mechanism

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Languages/Pascal/Delphi/Q_22039681.html

And neither of these worked for me.

Here's my Thread unit:

unit uCheckForUpdateThread;

interface

uses
  Windows, IdBaseComponent, IdComponent, IdTCPConnection, IdTCPClient,
  IdHTTP, GlobalFuncs, Classes, HtmlExtractor, SysUtils, Forms;

type
  TUpdaterThread = class(TThread)
  private
    FileGrabber : THtmlExtractor;
    HTTP : TIdHttp;
    AppMajor,
    AppMinor,
    AppRelease : Integer;
    UpdateText : string;
    VersionStr : string;
    ExceptionText : string;
    FException: Exception;
    procedure DoHandleException;
    procedure SyncUpdateLbl;
    procedure SyncFinalize;
  public
    constructor Create;

  protected
    procedure HandleException; virtual;

    procedure Execute; override;
  end;

implementation

uses
  uMain;

{ TUpdaterThread }

constructor TUpdaterThread.Create;
begin
  inherited Create(False);
end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.Execute;
begin
  inherited;
  FreeOnTerminate := True;

  if Terminated then
    Exit;

  FileGrabber           := THtmlExtractor.Create;
  HTTP                  := TIdHTTP.Create(nil);
  try
    try
      FileGrabber.Grab('http://jeffijoe.com/xSky/Updates/CheckForUpdates.php');
    except on E: Exception do
    begin
      UpdateText := 'Error while updating xSky!';
      ExceptionText := 'Error: Cannot find remote file! Please restart xSky and try again! Also, make sure you are connected to the Internet, and that your Firewall is not blocking xSky!';
      HandleException;
    end;
    end;

    try
      AppMajor      := StrToInt(FileGrabber.ExtractValue('AppMajor[', ']'));
      AppMinor      := StrToInt(FileGrabber.ExtractValue('AppMinor[', ']'));
      AppRelease    := StrToInt(FileGrabber.ExtractValue('AppRelease[[', ']'));
    except on E:Exception do
    begin
      HandleException;
    end;
    end;

    if (APP_VER_MAJOR < AppMajor) or (APP_VER_MINOR < AppMinor) or (APP_VER_RELEASE < AppRelease) then
    begin
      VersionStr := Format('%d.%d.%d', [AppMajor, AppMinor, AppRelease]);
      UpdateText := 'Downloading Version ' + VersionStr;
      Synchronize(SyncUpdateLbl);
    end;

  finally
    FileGrabber.Free;
    HTTP.Free;
  end;
  Synchronize(SyncFinalize);
end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.SyncFinalize;
begin
  DoTransition(frmMain.TransSearcher3, frmMain.gbLogin, True, 500);
end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.SyncUpdateLbl;
begin
  frmMain.lblCheckingForUpdates.Caption := UpdateText;
end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.HandleException;
begin
  FException := Exception(ExceptObject);
  try
    Synchronize(DoHandleException);
  finally
    FException := nil;
  end;
end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.DoHandleException;
begin
  Application.ShowException(FException);
end;

end.

If you need more info just let me know.

Again: The IDE catches all the exceptions, but my program does not show them.

EDIT: It was Cosmin's solution that worked in the end - and the reason it didn't at first, was because I didn't add the ErrMsg variable, instead I just placed whatever the variable would contain into the Synchronize, which would NOT work, however I have NO idea why. I realized it when I had no other ideas, and I just messed around with the solutions.

As always, the joke's on me. =P

share|improve this question
    
Could you post your sorce plz? –  Rafael Colucci Mar 26 '11 at 14:46
    
Added source :) –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 14:51
    
I removed the Raise from the code, since it did not work. I tried with using a Synchronized raise, too, which did not work - thats why the ExceptionText is there, forgot to remove it. –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 14:54
    
Perhaps you are not having exceptions at all? What kind of exceptions are you having? –  Rafael Colucci Mar 26 '11 at 15:09
2  
Jeff, if you can't tell the difference between "exceptions aren't shown to the user" and "exceptions aren't being raised," then you also can't tell the difference between "I've been stuck indoors all day" and "the sun didn't rise today." Just because you're not notified of something doesn't mean it didn't happen. Please edit your question to be more precise about exactly what did or didn't happen, and what your expectations were. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 26 '11 at 19:05

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here's my very, very short "take" on the issue. It only works on Delphi 2010+ (because that version introduced Anonymous methods). Unlike the more sophisticated methods already posted mine only shows the error message, nothing more, nothing less.

procedure TErrThread.Execute;
var ErrMsg: string;
begin
  try
    raise Exception.Create('Demonstration purposes exception');
  except on E:Exception do
    begin
      ErrMsg := E.ClassName + ' with message ' + E.Message;
      // The following could be all written on a single line to be more copy-paste friendly  
      Synchronize(
        procedure
        begin
          ShowMessage(ErrMsg);
        end
      );
    end;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Just as with the others, only the IDE shows the error, the application does not raise the exception :( –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 16:47
    
what happens if you raise an exception in your main thread? –  David Heffernan Mar 26 '11 at 16:58
    
@David - works absolutely perfect, it stops execution and everything! –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 17:01
    
@David - that is, if I do it outside a thread, so no synchronize or anything TThread related –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 17:02
1  
@Jeff, copy-paste my code as is in a new Forms application, tell us if it shows you the error. That code works, I'm using it in production, and I also tested it before posting. And it's only doing ShowMessage in Synchronize, I'm honestly having a really hard time believing it doesn't work. –  Cosmin Prund Mar 26 '11 at 19:43

Something very important you need to understand about multi-theraded development:

Each thread has its own call-stack, almost as if they're separate programs. This includes the main-thread of your program.

Threads can only interact with each other in specific ways:

  • They can operate on shared data or objects. This can lead to concurrency issues 'race conditions', and therefore you need to be able to help them 'share data nicely'. Which brings us to the next point.
  • They can "signal each other" using a variety of OS support routines. These include things like:
    • Mutexes
    • Critical Sections
    • Events
  • And finally you can send messages to other threads. Provided the thread has in some way been written to be a message receiver.

NB: Note that threads cannot strictly speaking call other threads directly. If for example Thread A tried to call Thread B directly, that would be a step on Thread A's call-stack!

This brings us to the topic of the question: "exceptions are not being raised in my threads"

The reason for this is that all an exception does is:

  • Record the error
  • And unwind the call-stack. <-- NB: Your TThread instance can't unwind the main thread's call-stack, and cannot arbitrarily interrupt the main threads execution.

So TThread will not automatically report exceptions to your main application.

You have to make the explicit decision as to how you wish to handle errors in threads, and implement accordingly.

Solution

  • The first step is the same as within a single threaded application. You need to decide what the error means and how the thread should react.
    • Should the thread continue processing?
    • Should the thread abort?
    • Should the error be logged/reported?
    • Does the error need a user decision? <-- This is by far the most difficult to implement, so we'll skip it for now.
  • Once this has been decided, implement the appropriate excpetion handler.
  • TIP: Make sure the exception doesn't escape the thread. The OS won't like you if it does.
  • If you need the main program (thread) to report the error to the user, you have a few options.
    • If the thread was written to return a result object, then it's easy: Make a change so that it can return the error in that object if something went wrong.
    • Send a message to the main thread to report the error. Note, the main thread already implements a message loop, so your application will report the error as soon as it processes that message.

EDIT: Code Sample for indicated requirement.

If all you want to do is notify the user, then Cosmind Prund's answer should work perfectly for Delphi 2010. Older versions of Delphi need a little more work. The following is conceptually similar to Jeff's own answer, but without the mistakes:

procedure TUpdaterThread.ShowException;
begin
  MessageDlg(FExceptionMessage, mtError, [mbOk], 0);
end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.Execute;
begin
  try

    raise Exception.Create('Test Exception');
    //The code for your thread goes here
    //
    //

  except
    //Based on your requirement, the except block should be the outer-most block of your code
    on E: Exception do
    begin
      FExceptionMessage := 'Exception: '+E.ClassName+'. '+E.Message;
      Synchronize(ShowException);
    end;
  end;
end;

Some important corrections on Jeff's own answer, including the implementation shown within his question:

The call to Terminate is only relevant if your thread is implemented within a while not Terminated do ... loop. Take a look at what the Terminate method actually does.

The call to Exit is an unnecessary waste, but you probably did this because of your next mistake.

In your question, you're wrapping each step in its own try...except to handle the exception. This is an absolute no-no! By doing this you pretend that even though an exception occurred, everything is ok. Your thread tries the next step, but is actually guaranteed to fail! This is not the way to handle exceptions!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the information, I did not know the fact about the Callstack! I have already decided what I want my thread to do when an exception occurs - I want it to terminate, and let the user know what went wrong, and give them the Exception.Message, too. The thread does not return anything (I didnt even know it could that, so I could make like a function out of it??). –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 17:52
    
Also, doesen't thread execution stop on Except? –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 17:53
    
Jeff, the only time thread execution stops is when the thread terminates. Reaching an except block does not cause termination. The debugger can interrupt thread execution, but that's not the same as terminating, and besides the debugged application has no direct knowledge of a debugger's actions on it. You can also suspend execution by sleeping, waiting, or sending a message to another thread. Those aren't the same as terminating, either. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 26 '11 at 19:01
    
Thanks for detailed answer! –  Najem Mar 26 '11 at 20:57
    
@Jeff: In a manner of speaking your thread is already returning results. It's updating a label on your main form. As for execution stopping on an exception: if you handle the exception inside a while not Terminated loop, then it will continue to execute. However, if you don't handle the exception, it unwinds your call-stack back to the thread's entry point and terminates. However, most OS's faced with this "bad behaviour" will GPF your entire application. –  Craig Young Mar 26 '11 at 23:12

Strange that everyone answered this question but failed to spot the obvious problem: given that exceptions raised in a background thread are asynchronous, and can occur at any time, this means that showing exceptions from a background thread would pop-up a dialog box at random times to the user, quite possibly showing an exception that has nothing to do with what the user is doing at the moment. I doubt that doing this could possibly enhance the user experience.

share|improve this answer
    
Who says that it's unrelated to what the user is doing? Not everything that lives in a thread is so. –  David Heffernan Mar 26 '11 at 23:49
    
True, but given the asynchronous nature of thread-based work, how would you know? Surely part of the process here is to not only blindly respond to user's questions, but to suggest sometimes that the user is asking the wrong question? In this case maybe showing errors in a form/status bar could be what is really required, but popping up dialogs initiated by asynchronous thread-based processing? Would anyone really want to do this to a user? –  Misha Mar 27 '11 at 0:22
    
@Misha All good points, but this question of Jeffs is part of a long-running series. As I understand it he's using threads in response to user action to communicate through some Skype API. And he uses threads because if he did it in the main thread then his UI would go non-responsive. So you are quite right to question the wisdom of showing a dialog, but I think in this instance Jeff is probably doing it right. –  David Heffernan Mar 27 '11 at 0:25
    
That's fair enough. –  Misha Mar 27 '11 at 0:26
    
We did not explain that to him because that was not the question he asked. He needs help with his thread, not a explanation of how show errors to user. –  Rafael Colucci Mar 27 '11 at 13:52

I've previously used SendMessge for inter thread communication using the TWMCopyData, so I think the following should work:

Const MyAppThreadError = WM_APP + 1;

constructor TUpdaterThread.Create(ErrorRecieverHandle: THandle);
begin
    Inherited Create(False);
    FErrorRecieverHandle := Application.Handle;
end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.Execute;
var
    cds: TWMCopyData;
begin
  try
     DoStuff;
  except on E:Exception do
    begin
        cds.dwData := 0;
        cds.cbData := Length(E.message) * SizeOf(Char);
        cds.lpData := Pointer(@E.message[1]);         
        SendMessage(FErrorRecieverHandle, MyAppThreadError, LPARAM(@cds), 0);
    end;
  end;
end;

I've only used it for sending simple data types or strings, but I'm sure it could be adapted send more information through as necessary.

You'll need add Self.Handle to the constructor in form created the thread and Handle the messsage in the form which created it

procedure HandleUpdateError(var Message:TMessage); message MyAppThreadError;
var
    StringValue: string;
    CopyData : TWMCopyData; 
begin
    CopyData := TWMCopyData(Msg);
    SetLength(StringValue, CopyData.CopyDataStruct.cbData div SizeOf(Char));
    Move(CopyData.CopyDataStruct.lpData^, StringValue[1], CopyData.CopyDataStruct.cbData);
    Message.Result := 0;
    ShowMessage(StringValue);
end;
share|improve this answer

Threads don't automatically propagate exceptions into other threads. So you must deal with it yourself.

Rafael has outlined one approach, but there are alternatives. The solution Rafael points to deals with the exception synchronously by marshalling it into the main thread.

In one of my own uses of threading, a thread pool, the threads catch and take over the ownership of the exceptions. This allows the controlling thread to handle them as it pleases.

The code looks like this.

procedure TMyThread.Execute;
begin
  Try
    DoStuff;
  Except
    on Exception do begin
      FExceptAddr := ExceptAddr;
      FException := AcquireExceptionObject;
      //FBugReport := GetBugReportCallStackEtcFromMadExceptOrSimilar.
    end;
  End;
end;

If the controlling thread elects to raise the exception it can do so like this:

raise Thread.FException at Thread.FExceptAddr;

Sometimes you may have code that cannot call Synchronize, e.g. some DLLs and this approach is useful.

Note that if you don't raise the exception that was captured, then it needs to be destroyed otherwise you have a memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't work for me either :( –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 15:04
    
well I'm sure you'll be able to work it out –  David Heffernan Mar 26 '11 at 15:18
1  
by the way jeff, "it doesn't work" is never much use to us. –  David Heffernan Mar 26 '11 at 15:37
    
@davi i totally agree. –  Rafael Colucci Mar 26 '11 at 15:48
1  
David, congrats on the gold Delphi badge. And +1 for AcquireExceptionObject, because I learned something new! –  Cosmin Prund Mar 26 '11 at 16:34

Well,

It is gonna be hard without your source code, but i have tested this:

How to handle exceptions in TThread objects

And it works fine. Perhaps you should take a look at it.

EDIT:

You are not following what the links you point out tell us to do. Check my link and you will see how to do that.

EDIT 2:

Try that and tell me if it worked:

 TUpdaterThread= class(TThread)
 private
   FException: Exception;
   procedure DoHandleException;
 protected
   procedure Execute; override;
   procedure HandleException; virtual;
 end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.Execute;
begin
  inherited;
  FreeOnTerminate := True;
  if Terminated then
    Exit;
  FileGrabber := THtmlExtractor.Create;
  HTTP := TIdHTTP.Create(Nil);
  try
    Try
      FileGrabber.Grab('http://jeffijoe.com/xSky/Updates/CheckForUpdates.php');
    Except
      HandleException;
    End;
    Try
      AppMajor := StrToInt(FileGrabber.ExtractValue('AppMajor[', ']'));
      AppMinor := StrToInt(FileGrabber.ExtractValue('AppMinor[', ']'));
      AppRelease := StrToInt(FileGrabber.ExtractValue('AppRelease[[', ']'));
    Except
      HandleException;
    End;
    if (APP_VER_MAJOR < AppMajor) or (APP_VER_MINOR < AppMinor) or (APP_VER_RELEASE < AppRelease) then begin
      VersionStr := Format('%d.%d.%d', [AppMajor, AppMinor, AppRelease]);
      UpdateText := 'Downloading Version ' + VersionStr;
      Synchronize(SyncUpdateLbl);
    end;
  finally
    FileGrabber.Free;
    HTTP.Free;
  end;
  Synchronize(SyncFinalize);

end;

procedure TUpdaterThread.HandleException;
begin
  FException := Exception(ExceptObject);
  try
    Synchronize(DoHandleException);
  finally
    FException := nil;
  end;
end;

procedure TMyThread.DoHandleException;
begin
  Application.ShowException(FException);
end;

EDIT 3:

You said you are no able to catch EIdHTTPProtocolException. But it works for me. Try this sample and see it for yourself:

procedure TUpdaterThread.Execute;
begin
  Try
    raise EIdHTTPProtocolException.Create('test');
  Except
    HandleException;
  End;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
I tried that one - it's basically the same code as in the SO question I linked to. –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 14:52
    
Yeah, but your code does not do that. –  Rafael Colucci Mar 26 '11 at 14:54
    
You are catching the exception but you are not showing it. –  Rafael Colucci Mar 26 '11 at 14:55
    
@Rafael - I removed the Raise ones because it did not work, and I was trying out the other methods, etc. Trust me, I tried the methods. –  Jeff Mar 26 '11 at 14:57
    
well .. then i really dont know because i tried this code and it works fine here. –  Rafael Colucci Mar 26 '11 at 15:05

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