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I understand why providing same hashcode for two equal (through equals) objects is important. But is the vice versa true as well, if two objects have same hashcode do they have to be equal? Does the contract still hold? I cannot find an example where this could happen, because if all those attributes that are taking part in equals method are being used to override hashcode method as well then we will always same hashcode of objects that are equal. Please comment.

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1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/4360035/… –  esaj Mar 26 '11 at 15:05

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If two objects have the same hashcode then they are NOT necessarily equal. Otherwise you will have discovered the perfect hash function. But the opposite is true - if the objects are equal ,then they must have the same hashcode.

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4  
+1 this is also relevant to hashed objects in general, not only java object. –  MByD Mar 26 '11 at 15:08
    
Consider this example Here firstBook and secondBook have different hashcodes.So how your statement is true if the objects are equal then they have the same hashcode –  Fresher May 21 at 13:10
    
what a silly answer...he didnt seem to answer why ? –  anshulkatta Jun 2 at 19:42
    
@Fresher - Sorry for the late answer. When two objects are equal, you must override hashcode so that the hashcodes are equal too. Otherwise you will have problems when you use the object in a collection. In your given example, they have written If you override equals(), you must override hashCode() as well. You see only the equals method declared, because they are talking only about the equals in the paragraph. Note that there is ... above it. This means the hashcode method was not written on purpose, so they show only the equals method. But the hashcode method must be added. –  Petar Minchev Jun 3 at 6:04
    
So you are saying that you must override hashcode so that the hashcodes are equal too.That means you are saying that firstBook and secondBook have equal hashcode or you are saying that we must override hashcode method so that we make both their hashcode equals. –  Fresher Jun 4 at 6:15

As a matter of fact

public int hashCode(){
    return 1;
}

Is a valid hashcode implementation...but a terrible one. Will make all your hashtables slow. But yes, you can have two different objects with the same hashcode. But that should not be the general case, a real implementation should give different hashcodes for different values most of the time.

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This is a valid argument. The only property a hash code has to satisfy to ensure correctness is that the hash codes should be different only if the underlying data structures are different. This is because different hash codes, by design, imply different underlying structures. –  Jasim Sep 25 '12 at 7:37

Curiously, NumberFormat is an example of a Java foundation class which violates the recommendation that:

As much as is reasonably practical, the hashCode method defined by class Object does return distinct integers for distinct objects.

Here is some code showing this, at least under the version of Java I'm currently running under Mac OS X 10.6.

Numberformat nf = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance();
NumberFormat nf2 = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance();
assert nf != nf2;  // passes -- they are different objects
assert !nf.equals(nf2);  // passes -- they are not equal
assert nf.hashCode() != nf2.hashCode();  // fails -- same hash code
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According to the Javadoc in: http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html#hashCode%28%29

It is not required that if two objects are unequal according to the equals(java.lang.Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce distinct integer results. However, the programmer should be aware that producing distinct integer results for unequal objects may improve the performance of hashtables.

Edit: In the real world two Strings may have the same hash code. For instance, if you want to store all string combinations that contain lowercase English letters (like "aaaaaaaaaa","aaaaaaaaab" and so on) of length 10, you can't assign a unique hash code to each of the 141.167.095.653.376 combinations, since int in Java is 32-bit and, therefore, can have up to 4.294.967.296 distinct values.

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hashCode value depends on the implementation. for example String class implements hashCode() function depending upon the value. it means

String a=new String("b");
String b=new String("b");

will have same hashcode but, these are two different objects. and a==b will return false.

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The purpose of the hashCode function is allow objects to be quickly partitioned into sets of things that are known to unequal to all items outside their own set. Suppose one has 1,000 items and one divides them into ten roughly-equal-sized sets. One call to hashCode could quickly identify the item as being not equal to 900 of the items, without having to use equals on any of those items. Even if one had to use equals to compare the item to 100 other items, that would still be only 1/10 the cost of comparing it to all 1000 items. In practice, even in a large collection, hashCode will often eliminate 99.9% or more of the unequal items, leaving at most a handful to be examined.

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Hash code method returns integer. If range of integer finishes then also two different object will have same hash code. So it is not necessary that two different object will have same hash code are equal.

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    To prove , if two objects have the same
    hashCode does not mean that they are equal

    Say you have two user defined classes

    class Object1{
        private final int hashCode = 21;
        public int hashCode(){
            return hashCode;
        }

        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            return (this == obj);
        }
    }

    class Object2{
        private final int hashCode = 21;
        public int hashCode(){
            return hashCode;
        }

        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            return (this == obj);
        }
    }

    Object1 object1 = new Object1();
    Object2 object2 = new Object2(); 

    Object1 object3 = new Object1();


    if(object1.hashCode() == object2.hashCode()){
         // return true, because the hashcodes are same
    }

    but 
    if(object1.equals(object3)){
            // will fail, because two different objects   
    }
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