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I have a list of strings like this:

['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', 'baz']

I want to replace the '**', '**' with a single '**', but leave 'bar', 'bar' intact. I.e. replace any consecutive number of '**' with a single one. My current code looks like this:

p = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', 'baz']
np = [p[0]]
for pi in range(1,len(p)):
  if p[pi] == '**' and np[-1] == '**':
    continue
  np.append(p[pi])

Is there any more pythonic way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
What should happen if there are three **s in a row? Should they reduce to two **s or one? –  Daniel Stutzbach Mar 26 '11 at 15:54
    
@Daniel: "I.e. replace any consecutive number of '**' with a single one." –  senderle Mar 26 '11 at 16:09
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not sure about pythonic, but this should work and is more terse:

star_list = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', 'baz']
star_list = [i for i, next_i in zip(star_list, star_list[1:] + [None]) 
             if (i, next_i) != ('**', '**')]

The above copies the list twice; if you want to avoid that, consider Tom Zych's method. Or, you could do as follows:

from itertools import islice, izip, chain

star_list = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', 'baz']
sl_shift = chain(islice(star_list, 1, None), [None])
star_list = [i for i, next_i in izip(star_list, sl_shift) 
             if (i, next_i) != ('**', '**')]

This can be generalized and made iterator-friendly -- not to mention more readable -- using a variation on the pairwise recipe from the itertools docs:

from itertools import islice, izip, chain, tee
def compress(seq, x):
    seq, shift = tee(seq)
    shift = chain(islice(shift, 1, None), (object(),))
    return (i for i, j in izip(seq, shift) if (i, j) != (x, x))

Tested:

>>> list(compress(star_list, '**'))
['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', 'baz']
share|improve this answer
    
Not a good solution, because of poor readability –  eyquem Mar 27 '11 at 16:17
    
@eyquem, I find it quite readable as is, but it would be easy to break down into smaller parts; just define zip_list = zip(star_list, star_list[1:] + [None]) and use zip_list in the comprehension. –  senderle Mar 27 '11 at 17:11
    
@user408952, @senderle: All answers are more "pythonic" than the original. Some even work. Most are much more "pythonic" than this answer. Please justify why this answer is "acceptable". –  John Machin Mar 27 '11 at 22:28
add comment

This works. Not sure how Pythonic it is.

import itertools

p = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', 'baz']

q = []
for key, iter in itertools.groupby(p):
    q.extend([key] * (1 if key == '**' else len(list(iter))))

print(q)
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, using groupby is a good alternative -- but couldn't you just do q.extend([key] if key == '**' else list(iter))? –  senderle Mar 27 '11 at 14:17
    
D'oh, good point. Not too familiar with itertools yet, I adapted a recipe I found. Thanks! –  Tom Zych Mar 27 '11 at 14:45
    
Cluttered solution , imo –  eyquem Mar 27 '11 at 16:18
    
@eyquem, I'd encourage Tom Zych to edit his answer, but I think the general idea is the best groupby-based solution -- as, it seems, do you, since you basically duplicate it in your answer. –  senderle Mar 27 '11 at 17:45
add comment
from itertools import groupby

p = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', 'baz']
keep = set(['foo',  'bar', 'baz'])
result = []

for k, g in groupby(p):
    if k in keep:
        result.extend(list(g))
    else:
        result.append(k)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for clarity . A pity that you didn't use a test if k=='**' instead of a useless set –  eyquem Mar 27 '11 at 16:20
    
@eyquem : using a set makes the solution extensible / maintenable, you can easily say what you want to "keep" or what you want to "compress". –  dugres Mar 28 '11 at 8:12
add comment

This is in my opinion pythonic

result = [v for i, v in enumerate(L) if L[i:i+2] != ["**", "**"]]

the only "trickery" being used is that L[i:i+2] is a list of one element when i == len(L)-1.

Note that of course the very same expression can also be used as a generator

share|improve this answer
    
It would be a bit more "pythonic" were you to use enumerate: [v for i, v in enumerate(L) if L[i:i+2] != ['**', '**']] –  John Machin Mar 28 '11 at 7:51
    
@John Machin: Agree, edited –  6502 Mar 28 '11 at 9:46
add comment

A generalised "pythonic" solution that works with any iterable (no backing up, no copying, no indexing, no slicing, doesn't fail if iterable is empty) and any thing-to-squeeze (including None):

>>> test = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**', 'baz', '**', '**',
...      'foo', '*','*', 'bar', 'bar','bar', '**', '**','foo','bar',]
>>>
>>> def squeeze(iterable, victim, _dummy=object()):
...     previous = _dummy
...     for item in iterable:
...         if item == victim == previous: continue
...         previous = item
...         yield item
...
>>> print test
['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**', 'baz', '**', '**', 'foo', '*'
, '*', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', 'foo', 'bar']
>>> print list(squeeze(test, "**"))
['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', 'baz', '**', 'foo', '*', '*', 'bar', 'bar
', 'bar', '**', 'foo', 'bar']
>>> print list(squeeze(["**"], "**"))
['**']
>>> print list(squeeze(["**", "**"], "**"))
['**']
>>> print list(squeeze([], "**"))
[]
>>>

Update for the edification of @eyquem who stated that victim could not be a sequence (or, presumably a set).

Having a container of victims means that there are two possible semantics:

>>> def squeeze2(iterable, victims, _dummy=object()):
...     previous = _dummy
...     for item in iterable:
...         if item == previous in victims: continue
...         previous = item
...         yield item
...
>>> def squeeze3(iterable, victims, _dummy=object()):
...     previous = _dummy
...     for item in iterable:
...         if item in victims and previous in victims: continue
...         previous = item
...         yield item
...
>>> guff = "c...d..e.f,,,g,,h,i.,.,.,.j"
>>> print "".join(squeeze2(guff, ".,"))
c.d.e.f,g,h,i.,.,.,.j
>>> print "".join(squeeze3(guff, ".,"))
c.d.e.f,g,h,i.j
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
@John Machin I love the use of continue : when item == victim == previous is True , the instruction previous=item isn't executed, contrary to what happens in my code. However, there is a drawback: victim can't be a sequence, as in the answer of dugres –  eyquem Mar 28 '11 at 14:09
    
@eyquem: Au contraire, mon cher :) See my updated answer. –  John Machin Mar 29 '11 at 9:33
    
@John Machin Could you explain why you don't define directly previous = object() in the code of the function squeeze() and you prefer to define a _dummy parameter with a default argument object() . By the way, what is object() ? Is object in this the super-metaclass that is used to define new-style classes ? –  eyquem Mar 29 '11 at 9:35
    
@John Machin With instruction if item == victim == previous: , the object victim can't be ('juju','10$',513) . The argument passed to the parameter iterable can be anything iterable, ok, but not the argument passed to parameter victim, that's what I mean. –  eyquem Mar 29 '11 at 9:42
    
@John Machin Why do you introduce squeeze3() ? - Introducing squeeze2() means you agree that squeeze() can't accept an iterable as argument for the parameter victim, doesn't it ? By the way, I didn't know the writing if item == previous in victims , Python is fine ! –  eyquem Mar 29 '11 at 9:57
show 4 more comments

A solution without itertools.groupby() :

p = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**', 'baz', '**', '**',
     'foo', '*','*', 'bar', 'bar','bar', '**', '**','foo','bar',]

def treat(A):
    prec = A[0]; yield prec
    for x in A[1:]:
        if (prec,x)!=('**','**'):  yield x
        prec = x

print p
print
print list(treat(p))

result

['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**',  
 'baz', '**', '**',
 'foo', '*', '*', 'bar', 'bar','bar', '**', '**',
 'foo', 'bar']


['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**',
 'baz', '**',
 'foo', '*', '*', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar', '**',
 'foo', 'bar']

Another solution, inspired from dugres

from itertools import groupby

p = ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**', 'baz', '**', '**',
     'foo', '*','*', 'bar', 'bar','bar', '**', '**','foo','bar',]

res = []
for k, g in groupby(p):
    res.extend(  ['**'] if k=='**' else list(g) )    
print res

It's like Tom Zych's solution, but simpler

.

EDIT

p = ['**','**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**', 'baz', '**', '**',
     'foo', '*','*', 'bar', 'bar','bar', '**', '**','foo','bar', '**', '**', '**']


q= ['**',12,'**',45, 'foo',78, '*',751, 'bar',4789, 'bar',3, '**', 5,'**',7, '**',
    73,'baz',4, '**',8, '**',20,'foo', 8,'*',36,'*', 36,'bar', 11,'bar',0,'bar',9,
    '**', 78,'**',21,'foo',27,'bar',355, '**',33, '**',37, '**','end']

def treat(B,dedupl):
    B = iter(B)
    prec = B.next(); yield prec
    for x in B:
        if not(prec==x==dedupl):  yield x
        prec = x

print 'gen = ( x for x in q[::2])'
gen = ( x for x in q[::2])
print 'list(gen)==p is ',list(gen)==p
gen = ( x for x in q[::2])
print 'list(treat(gen)==',list(treat(gen,'**'))

ch = '??h4i4???4t4y?45l????hmo4j5???'
print '\nch==',ch
print "''.join(treat(ch,'?'))==",''.join(treat(ch,'?'))

print "\nlist(treat([],'%%'))==",list(treat([],'%%'))

result

gen = ( x for x in q[::2])
list(gen)==p is  True
list(treat(gen)== ['**', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', 'baz', '**', 'foo', '*', '*', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar', '**', 'foo', 'bar', '**']

ch== ??h4i4???4t4y?45l????hmo4j5???
''.join(treat(ch,'?'))== ?h4i4?4t4y?45l?hmo4j5?

list(treat([],'%%'))== []

.

Remark: A generator function allows to adapt the output to the type of the input with a writing around the call of the generator, it dosn't require to change th internal code of the genrator function;

That's not the case with the Tom Zynch's solution , that can't be adapted so easely to the type of the input

.

EDIT 2

I searched a one-line method, with a list comprehension or a generator expression.

I found to ways of doing this, I think it isn't possible to do without groupby()

from itertools import groupby
from operator import concat

p = ['**', '**','foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**',
     'bar','**','foo','sun','sun','sun']
print 'p==',p,'\n'

dedupl = ("**",'sun')
print 'dedupl==',repr(dedupl)

print [ x for k, g in groupby(p) for x in ((k,) if k in dedupl else g) ]

# or

print reduce(concat,( [k] if k in dedupl else list(g) for k, g in groupby(p)),[])

Based on the same principle, it is easy to convert the function of dugres into a generator function:

from itertools import groupby

def compress(iterable, to_compress):
    for k, g in groupby(iterable):
        if k in to_compress:
            yield k
        else:
            for x in g: yield x

However , this generator function has two disadvantages:

  • it resorts to the function groupby(), which is not easy to understand by someone not used to Python

  • its execution's time is longer than the ones of my generator function treat() and the generator function of John Machin, that don't use groupby().

I slightly modified them to make them able to accept a sequence of items to be de-duplicated, and I measured the durations of execution:

from time import clock
from itertools import groupby

def squeeze(iterable, victims, _dummy=object()):
    if hasattr(iterable, '__iter__') and not hasattr(victims, '__iter__'):
        victims = (victims,)
    previous = _dummy
    for item in iterable:
        if item in victims and item==previous:
            continue
        previous = item
        yield item

def treat(B,victims):
    if hasattr(B, '__iter__') and not hasattr(victims, '__iter__'):
        victims = (victims,)
    B = iter(B)
    prec = B.next(); yield prec
    for x in B:
        if x  not in victims or x!=prec:  yield x
        prec = x

def compress(iterable, to_compress):
    if hasattr(iterable, '__iter__') and not hasattr(to_compress, '__iter__'):
        to_compress = (to_compress,)
    for k, g in groupby(iterable):
        if k in to_compress:
            yield k
        else:
            for x in g: yield x

p = ['**', '**','su','foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**',
     'su','su','**','bin', '*','*','bar','bar','su','su','su']

n = 10000

te = clock()
for i in xrange(n):
    a = list(compress(p,('**','sun')))
print clock()-te,'  generator function with groupby()'

te = clock()
for i in xrange(n):
    b = list(treat(p,('**','sun')))
print clock()-te,'  generator function eyquem'


te = clock()
for i in xrange(n):
    c = list(squeeze(p,('**','sun')))
print clock()-te,'  generator function John Machin'

print p
print 'a==b==c is ',a==b==c
print a

The instruction

if hasattr(iterable, '__iter__') and not hasattr(to_compress, '__iter__'):
    to_compress = (to_compress,)

is necessary to avoid errors when the the iterable argument is a sequence and the other argument only one string: this latter needs then to be modified into a container, provided that the iterable argument isn't a string itself.

It is based on the fact that sequences like tuples, lists, stes... have the method iter, but strings haven't. The following code shows the problems:

def compress(iterable, to_compress):
    if hasattr(iterable, '__iter__') and not hasattr( to_compress, '__iter__'):
        to_compress = (to_compress,)
    print 't_compress==',repr(to_compress)
    for k, g in groupby(iterable):
        if k in to_compress:
            yield k
        else:
            for x in g: yield x


def compress_bof(iterable, to_compress):
    if not hasattr(to_compress, '__iter__'): # to_compress is a string
        to_compress = (to_compress,)
    print 't_compress==',repr(to_compress)
    for k, g in groupby(iterable):
        if k in to_compress:
            yield k
        else:
            for x in g: yield x


def compress_bug(iterable, to_compress_bug):
    print 't_compress==',repr(to_compress_bug)
    for k, g in groupby(iterable):
        #print 'k==',k,k in to_compress_bug
        if k in to_compress_bug:
            yield k
        else:
            for x in g: yield x


q = ';;;htr56;but78;;;;$$$$;ios4!'
print 'q==',q
dedupl = ";$"
print 'dedupl==',repr(dedupl)
print

print "''.join(compress    (q,"+repr(dedupl)+")) :\n",''.join(compress    (q,dedupl))+\
      ' <-CORRECT ONE'
print
print "''.join(compress_bof(q,"+repr(dedupl)+")) :\n",''.join(compress_bof(q,dedupl))+\
      '  <====== error ===='
print
print "''.join(compress_bug(q,"+repr(dedupl)+")) :\n",''.join(compress_bug(q,dedupl))

print '\n\n\n'


q = [';$', ';$',';$','foo', ';', 'bar','bar',';',';',';','$','$','foo',';$12',';$12']
print 'q==',q
dedupl = ";$12"
print 'dedupl==',repr(dedupl)
print
print 'list(compress    (q,'+repr(dedupl)+')) :\n',list(compress    (q,dedupl)),\
      ' <-CORRECT ONE'
print
print 'list(compress_bof(q,'+repr(dedupl)+')) :\n',list(compress_bof(q,dedupl))
print
print 'list(compress_bug(q,'+repr(dedupl)+')) :\n',list(compress_bug(q,dedupl)),\
      '  <====== error ===='
print

result

q== ;;;htr56;but78;;;;$$$$;ios4!
dedupl== ';$'

''.join(compress    (q,';$')) :
t_compress== ';$'
;htr56;but78;$;ios4! <-CORRECT ONE

''.join(compress_bof(q,';$')) :
t_compress== (';$',)
;;;htr56;but78;;;;$$$$;ios4!  <====== error ====

''.join(compress_bug(q,';$')) :
t_compress== ';$'
;htr56;but78;$;ios4!




q== [';$', ';$', ';$', 'foo', ';', 'bar', 'bar', ';', ';', ';', '$', '$', 'foo', ';$12', ';$12']
dedupl== ';$12'

list(compress    (q,';$12')) :
t_compress== (';$12',)
[';$', ';$', ';$', 'foo', ';', 'bar', 'bar', ';', ';', ';', '$', '$', 'foo', ';$12']  <-CORRECT ONE

list(compress_bof(q,';$12')) :
t_compress== (';$12',)
[';$', ';$', ';$', 'foo', ';', 'bar', 'bar', ';', ';', ';', '$', '$', 'foo', ';$12']

list(compress_bug(q,';$12')) :
t_compress== ';$12'
[';$', 'foo', ';', 'bar', 'bar', ';', '$', 'foo', ';$12']   <====== error ====

I obtained the following execution's time:

0.390163274941   generator function with groupby()
0.324547114228   generator function eyquem
0.310176572721   generator function John Machin
['**', '**', 'su', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', '**', '**', 'su', 'su', '**', 'bin', '*', '*', 'bar', 'bar', 'su', 'su', 'su']
a==b==c is  True
['**', 'su', 'foo', '*', 'bar', 'bar', '**', 'su', 'su', '**', 'bin', '*', '*', 'bar', 'bar', 'su', 'su', 'su']

I prefer the solution of John Machin because there is no instruction B = iter(B) as in mine.

But the instruction previous = _dummy with _dummy = object() appears weird to me. So I finally think the better solution is the following code, that works even with a string as iterable argument, and in which the first object previous being defined isn't a fake:

def squeeze(iterable, victims):
    if hasattr(iterable, '__iter__') and not hasattr(victims, '__iter__'):
        victims = (victims,)
    for item in iterable:
        previous = item
        break
    for item in iterable:
        if item in victims and item==previous:
            continue
        previous = item
        yield item

.

EDIT 3

I had undesrtood that object() was used as a sentinel.

But I was puzzled by the fact object is CALLED. Yesterday, I was thinking that object is something so peculiar that it is impossible that object be in any iterable passed as an argument to squeeze(). So, I was wondering why you called it, John Machin, and that sowed doubt in my mind concerning its nature; that's why I asked you a confirmation that object is the super meta-class.

But today, I think I understand why object is called in your code.

In fact, it is quite possible that object be in an iterable, why not ? Super meta-class object is an object, so nothing prevents it to have been put in the iterable before a de-duplication is processed on the iterable, who knows ? Then using object itself as a sentinel is incorrect practice.

.

So you didn't use object but an instance object() as a sentinel.

But I wondered why to choose this mysterious thing that the return of a call to object is ?

My reflections went on about this point and I remarked something that must be the reason of this call:

calling object creates an instance , since object is the most base class in Python, and each time an instance is created, it is a different object from any prior created instance, with a value always different from the value of any prior object's instance:

a = object()
b = object()
c = object()
d = object()

print id(a),'\n',id(b),'\n',id(c),'\n',id(d)

print a==b,a==c,a==d
print b==c,b==d,c==d

result

10818752 
10818760 
10818768 
10818776
False False False
False False False

So it is sure that _dummy=object() is a unique object, having a unique id and a unique value. By the way , I wonder what is the value of an object's instance. Anyway the following code shows the problem with _dummy=object and the absence of problem with _dummy=object()

def imperfect_squeeze(iterable, victim, _dummy=object):
    previous = _dummy
    print 'id(previous)   ==',id(previous)
    print 'id(iterable[0])==',id(iterable[0])
    for item in iterable:
        if item in victim and item==previous:  continue
        previous = item; yield item

def squeeze(iterable, victim, _dummy=object()):
    previous = _dummy
    print 'id(previous)   ==',id(previous)
    print 'id(iterable[0])==',id(iterable[0])
    for item in iterable:
        if item in victim and item==previous:  continue
        previous = item; yield item

wat = object
li = [wat,'**','**','foo',wat,wat]
print 'imperfect_squeeze\n''li before ==',li
print map(id,li)
li = list(imperfect_squeeze(li,[wat,'**']))
print 'li after  ==',li
print


wat = object()
li = [wat,'**','**','foo',wat,wat]
print 'squeeze\n''li before ==',li
print map(id,li)
li = list(squeeze(li,[wat,'**']))
print 'li after  ==',li
print


li = [object(),'**','**','foo',object(),object()]
print 'squeeze\n''li before ==',li
print map(id,li)
li = list(squeeze(li,[li[0],'**']))
print 'li after  ==',li

result

imperfect_squeeze
li before == [<type 'object'>, '**', '**', 'foo', <type 'object'>, <type 'object'>]
[505317320, 18578968, 18578968, 13208848, 505317320, 505317320]
id(previous)   == 505317320
id(iterable[0])== 505317320
li after  == ['**', 'foo', <type 'object'>]

squeeze
li before == [<object object at 0x00A514C8>, '**', '**', 'foo', <object object at 0x00A514C8>, <object object at 0x00A514C8>]
[10818760, 18578968, 18578968, 13208848, 10818760, 10818760]
id(previous)   == 10818752
id(iterable[0])== 10818760
li after  == [<object object at 0x00A514C8>, '**', 'foo', <object object at 0x00A514C8>]

squeeze
li before == [<object object at 0x00A514D0>, '**', '**', 'foo', <object object at 0x00A514D8>, <object object at 0x00A514E0>]
[10818768, 18578968, 18578968, 13208848, 10818776, 10818784]
id(previous)   == 10818752
id(iterable[0])== 10818768
li after  == [<object object at 0x00A514D0>, '**', 'foo', <object object at 0x00A514D8>, <object object at 0x00A514E0>]

The problem is consisting in the absence of <type 'object'> as first element of the list after treatment by imperfect_squeeze() .

However, we must note that the "problem" is possible only with a list whose FIRST element is object: that's a lot of reflections about such a tiny probability.... but a rigorous coder takes account of all.

If we resort to list, instead of object , the results are different:

def imperfect_sqlize(iterable, victim, _dummy=list):
    previous = _dummy
    print 'id(previous)   ==',id(previous)
    print 'id(iterable[0])==',id(iterable[0])
    for item in iterable:
        if item in victim and item==previous:  continue
        previous = item; yield item

def sqlize(iterable, victim, _dummy=list()):
    previous = _dummy
    print 'id(previous)   ==',id(previous)
    print 'id(iterable[0])==',id(iterable[0])
    for item in iterable:
        if item in victim and item==previous:  continue
        previous = item; yield item

wat = list
li = [wat,'**','**','foo',wat,wat]
print 'imperfect_sqlize\n''li before ==',li
print map(id,li)
li = list(imperfect_sqlize(li,[wat,'**']))
print 'li after  ==',li
print

wat = list()
li = [wat,'**','**','foo',wat,wat]
print 'sqlize\n''li before ==',li
print map(id,li)
li = list(sqlize(li,[wat,'**']))
print 'li after  ==',li
print

li = [list(),'**','**','foo',list(),list()]
print 'sqlize\n''li before ==',li
print map(id,li)
li = list(sqlize(li,[li[0],'**']))
print 'li after  ==',li

result

imperfect_sqlize
li before == [<type 'list'>, '**', '**', 'foo', <type 'list'>, <type 'list'>]
[505343304, 18578968, 18578968, 13208848, 505343304, 505343304]
id(previous)   == 505343304
id(iterable[0])== 505343304
li after  == ['**', 'foo', <type 'list'>]

sqlize
li before == [[], '**', '**', 'foo', [], []]
[18734936, 18578968, 18578968, 13208848, 18734936, 18734936]
id(previous)   == 18734656
id(iterable[0])== 18734936
li after  == ['**', 'foo', []]

sqlize
li before == [[], '**', '**', 'foo', [], []]
[18734696, 18578968, 18578968, 13208848, 18735016, 18734816]
id(previous)   == 18734656
id(iterable[0])== 18734696
li after  == ['**', 'foo', []]

Is there any other object than object in Python that have this peculiarity ?

John Machin, why did you choose an instance of object as a sentinel in your generator function ? Did you already know the above peculiarity ?

share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice generator. –  senderle Mar 27 '11 at 17:09
    
@eyquem: NOT a nice generator: needs sequence as input; fails on empty sequence; copies (A[1:]) –  John Machin Mar 27 '11 at 22:20
    
@John Machin I suppose that you mean that it is a generator but not a nice one. I edited to take account of your nice remark. –  eyquem Mar 27 '11 at 23:34
    
@eyquem: (1) All that hasattr mucking about to determine whether the 'victim' is solo or a legion is horribly unpythonic. Just say it's a container and be done with it. (2) I'm sad that you don't like the idea of a 'fake' "can't equal anything else" object (better described as a 'sentinel') -- diss that, you are dissing Knuth. (3) You do seem to like some of my code and I've enlightened you on a few interesting things; how about an upvote? –  John Machin Mar 30 '11 at 10:18
    
@John Machin (1) Why unpythonic ? I added the verification of the argument defining the elements to de-duplicate because I met with a bug with iterable = ['**','**','sun','*','*','*'] and to_compress = '**' , the result being ['**', 'sun', '*'] instead of ['**', 'sun', '*', '*', '*']. –  eyquem Mar 30 '11 at 10:47
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