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hey! so, i have this problem, im currently doing some modification on a web application that generates tables. basically i need to change how the table is presented, eg. add rounded corners on it.

i have 3 cells

________________________
| cell 1 | cell 2 | cell 3 |
------------------

as of now, what i try to do is add a background image using a class tag on cell 1 and cell 3. cell 1 is good, the only problem is with cell 3...as the image is stuck on the left of the tag. i tried pushing it to the right with text-align but apparently it's the wrong command. was wondering as to how i can push the image to the right of cell 3.

.table{position: relative; bacground:#ffffff; border:0px; border-collapse: collapse;}
.cell1, .cell3 {position:relative; height:40px; width:50; margin-bottom:-1}
.cell2 {width: 100px;}
.cell1{background: url(/imageleft.gif) no-repeat #ffffff;}
.cell2{background: url(/imageright.gif) no-repeat #ffffff; text-align: right;}

any thoughts is appreciated! thanks!

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is it about background-image, right? Then you should be able to use background position property.. like:

.cell3 {background: url(/imageleft.gif) no-repeat #ffffff top right;}
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awesome, it worked! thanks! – gdubs Mar 26 '11 at 16:11

The easiest way would be to wrap the table in a DIV and then give that DIV the rounded corners.

HTML:

<div class="table_wrapper">

    <table>...</table>

</div>

CSS: (Red background to show effect)

.table_wrapper { background:red; border-radius:10px; -moz-border-radius:10px; -webkit-border-radius:10px; padding:10px; }
.table_wrapper table { width:100%; }
share|improve this answer
    
well, im trying to give EACH ROW a rounded corner. so every thing in the <tr> basically. – gdubs Mar 26 '11 at 16:12

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