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When logging, you always get entangled in string literals.

I solved that nicely for properties, fields and variables by passing an Expression<Func<T>> expression (as explained here), so you can do things like this:

public void Demo(string someArgument)
{
    LogFrameWork.LogLine("Demo"); // goal is to get rid of these string literals
    LogFramework.Log(() => someArgument);
}

I want to do something similar for the method Demo itself:

public void Demo(string someArgument)
{
    LogFramework.Log(this.Demo);
}

I tried things like this:

public static void Log(Delegate method)
{
    string methodName = method.Method.Name;
    LogLine(methodName);
}

and this:

public static void Log(Action method)
{
    string methodName = method.Method.Name;
    LogLine(methodName);
}

But I get compiler errors like these:

Argument 1: cannot convert from 'method group' to 'System.Delegate' 
Argument 1: cannot convert from 'method group' to 'System.Action'   

I could introduce a bunch of overloads using Func<...> and Action<...>, but that sounds overly complex.

Is there a way to cover this for any method with any number of parameters and an optional result?

--jeroen

PS: I think this question might have some relevance here, but no answers that got me a 'aha' feeling :-)

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1  
I understand your question, however, don't you think you it would be much easier and more extensible with some AOP framework? You could create custom attribute that would mark methods that should be logged on invocation. –  empi Mar 26 '11 at 16:21
1  
I've used AOP in the past, and it caused the compile/link times to skyrocket. Since .NET already has much higher compile/link times, I'd rather avoid that. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 26 '11 at 16:29
1  
Every solution for this general problem I've seen using expression trees has used the multiple overloads approach, which is also a bit awkward, since you need to include parameters. If I'm going to write manual trace logging, I generally just pass the method name as a string constant and rely on Resharper to remind me to keep them in sync. –  Dan Bryant Mar 26 '11 at 16:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of trying to pass the method in as a parameter to your logger, look at it from the perspective of having the logger identify the calling method.

Here's an (pseudo) example:

Logger Class

public void Debug( string message )
{
  message = string.Format( "{0}: {1}", GetCallingMethodInfo(), message );
  // logging stuff
}

/// <summary>
/// Gets the application name and method that called the logger.
/// </summary>
/// <returns></returns>
private static string GetCallingMethodInfo()
{
  // we should be looking at the stack 2 frames in the past:
  // 1. for the calling method in this class
  // 2. for the calling method that called the method in this class
  MethodBase method = new StackFrame( 2 ).GetMethod();
  string name = method.Name;
  string type = method.DeclaringType.Name;

  return string.Format( "{0}.{1}", type, name );
}

Anywhere that uses the logger:

// resides in class Foo
public void SomeMethod()
{
  logger.Debug("Start");
}

The output from the logger will then be: Foo.SomeMethod: Start

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+1; thanks for elaborating on the solution that Josh G proposed. I did get what he meant, but having a more elaborate example at hand will help future users a lot. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 26 '11 at 16:38
1  
This is from a logging library I wrote using MS Enterprise Logging Library a couple of years ago. This solved pretty much what you are trying to achieve, I think, in that you want the logger to know what method called the logger. The nice thing about this is using the DeclaringType, you'll end up with a full NameSpace to the method. and never have to worry about adding the method name as part of the logging message. –  Metro Smurf Mar 26 '11 at 17:04
1  
I accepted your answer because it creates the cleanest code at the call-site. No convoluted expressions. Nice. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Apr 13 '11 at 22:36
    
Same problem is this one. In release no useful frames available. And the other one is cleaner actually. –  Bitterblue Jul 10 '14 at 8:50

You can also achieve this without using ExpressionTrees through System.Diagnostics.StackTrace.

StackTrace trace = new StackTrace();

And then:

trace.GetFrame(0).GetMethod().Name

To get the MethodInfo and then name of the current method, or:

trace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod().Name 

To get the calling method.

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+1; Interesting! Will investigate this. Thanks for thinking outside the box. This will most likely also help me a lot getting the parameters in an automagical way. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 26 '11 at 16:36
1  
This is especially non-performant, and carries the risk of frames being optimized away. –  Kirk Woll Mar 26 '11 at 16:39
    
@Kirk: expressions are known to be very costly as well, can you elaborate on the being optimized away part; do you mean inlining? –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 26 '11 at 16:40
1  
What Kirk is saying (and this is a legitimate concern) is that if you build an optimized release build instead of a debug build, you might not find the correct frames in the stack trace. In fact, you might not find ANY frames in the stack trace. –  Josh G Mar 28 '11 at 12:11
1  
Yes useful for the Debug version. In Release I see only the Main frame and the logger method, nothing in between. :( –  Bitterblue Jul 10 '14 at 8:41

This is much harder than it looks. I think you might be best with the generic Func and Action overloads, but there is a way to do this with expression trees. Here's an example in LINQPad:

public static void Log(Expression<Action> expr)
{
    Console.WriteLine(((MethodCallExpression)expr.Body).Method.Name);
}

void Main()
{
    Log(() => DoIt());
    Log(() => DoIt2(null));
    Log(() => DoIt3());
}

public void DoIt()
{
    Console.WriteLine ("Do It!");
}

public void DoIt2(string s)
{
    Console.WriteLine ("Do It 2!" + s);
}

public int DoIt3()
{
    Console.WriteLine ("Do It 3!");
    return 3;
}

This outputs:

DoIt
DoIt2
DoIt3

Note that I had to use lambdas and specify dummy arguments when calling the Log method.

This is based on Fyodor Soikin's excellent answer.

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Thanks for the answer; I was afraid it would turn out to be something like this, but it is good to have it confirmed. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 27 '11 at 19:48

You can define a delegate, then accept that delegate as a parameter.

public delegate void DemoDelegate(string arg);

public void MyMethod(DemoDelegate delegate)
{
    // Call the delegate
    delegate("some string");
}

You can call MyMethod like this:

MyMethod(delegate(string arg) 
{
   // do something
});

or

void MethodThatTakesAString(string value)
{
    // do something
}

MyMethod(MethodThatTakesAString);

See this link for more information:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288459(v=vs.71).aspx

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1  
I know about delegates, but fail to see how this would help me for any method with any number of parameters. Please elaborate, as I probably look over something very obvious :-) –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 26 '11 at 16:31

Try this:

/// <summary>
/// Trace data event handler delegate.
/// </summary>
/// <returns>The data to write to the trace listeners</returns>
public delegate object TraceDataEventHandler();

public static class Tracing
{

    /// Trace a verbose message using an undefined event identifier and message.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="message">The delegate to call for the trace message if this event should be traced.</param>
    [Conditional("TRACE")]
    public static void TraceVerbose(TraceMessageEventHandler message)
    {
        ... your logic here
    }
}

Then you can do...

Tracing.TraceVerbose(() => String.Format(...));

I hope I have understood your question correctly... does this do what you want?

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