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I have images i want to add in the following folder: G:\my java\DesktopApplication1\build\classes\desktopapplication1\resources.

How to go about adding image in this folder to my labels or frames?

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3 Answers 3

Once built, the image will typically be inside a Jar. The resources in a Jar can be accessed a number of ways, here is one.

URL urlToImage = this.getClass().getResource(
    "/desktopapplication1/resources/the.png");
ImageIcon imageIcon = new ImageIcon(urlToImage);
JLabel ...
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You can do something like this:

ImageIcon image = new ImageIcon("path_to_image");
JLabel label = new JLabel(image);
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I did something like this:

         JLabel l2=new JLabel("");
      try {
        Image img = ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("resources/wait20.gif"));
        l2.setIcon(new ImageIcon(img));
          }
      catch (IOException ex) {
        }

It does work, but i would have liked it more had the GIF animation was displayed. Nevertheless, if a static image is to be displayed, this is the way to do it.

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@sunandan "..but i would have liked it more had the GIF animation was displayed" What were you doing wrong? Animated GIFs appear just fine in JLabels here. BTW - tip: the word 'I' should always be upper case, no matter where it is in a sentence. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 26 '11 at 18:30
    
@sunandan: if you were looking for animated gif solution try to have a look at this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/149153/… –  Heisenbug Mar 26 '11 at 18:33
    
@0verbose/@sunandan See my reply to that thread. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 26 '11 at 18:44
    
@overbose : I had a look at the thread . I have set ImageObserver property to l2, where my animated gif is added. However, no animation is displayed. –  CyprUS Mar 26 '11 at 18:52
    
@sunandan re catch (IOException ex) {} That is very unhelpful when code breaks - go for something more like catch (IOException ex) {ex.printStackTrace();} –  Andrew Thompson Mar 26 '11 at 18:53

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