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array = [1,2,3,{:name => "Peter"}, "hello"]
array.each do |element| # it can be "inject", "map" or other iterators
  # How to return object "array" and position of "element"
  # also next and priviouse "element"
end

of course I can return index by array.index[element] but I am searching for more natural solution. Like proxy_owner in Rails associations

Ruby 1.8.7

What I want to output? I want to return object wich I iterating (array in my case), also number of iteration (index in case of each_with_index)next and priviouse element of iteration.

As input I have got an Array and iterator (each, map, inject etc)

share|improve this question
1  
Doesn't each_with_index work? If so, you can do array[i-1], array[i+1]. – sawa Mar 26 '11 at 19:58
    
what about inject_with_index or select_with_index? :) I think there presents common approach – fl00r Mar 26 '11 at 20:00
    
what's the desired output? it's better to show actual input/output than trying to explain with words. – tokland Mar 26 '11 at 22:02
    
updated ny question a little – fl00r Mar 26 '11 at 22:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use Enumerable#each_cons. The following is a copy from ruby1.8.7 rdoc. It should work on ruby 1.8.7.


  • each_cons(n) {...}
  • each_cons(n)

Iterates the given block for each array of consecutive elements. If no block is given, returns an enumerator.


With this , you can give an array:

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'].each_cons(3).to_a

# => ["a", "b", "c"], ["b", "c", "d"], ["c", "d", "e"]]

or do:

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'].each_cons(3) {|previous, current, nekst|
    puts "#{previous} - #{current} - #{nekst}"
}

# => a - b - c
# => b - c - d
# => c - d - e

If you want indice,

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'].each_cons(3).to_a.each_with_index {|(previous, current, nekst), i|
    puts "#{i + 1}. #{previous} - #{current} - #{nekst}"
}

# => 1. a - b - c
# => 2. b - c - d
# => 3. c - d - e

You can pass the array to other enumerators quite generally, for example, with inject:

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'].each_cons(3).to_a.inject(''){|str, (previous, current, nekst)|
    str << previous+current+nekst
}

# => "abcbcdcde"
share|improve this answer
    
Quite smart and adroitly :) I'll use it. But it is not actually what I am looking for – fl00r Mar 26 '11 at 21:00
1  
Can you fix the link, and clarify whether it'd give 'a', 'b', 'c' then 'b', 'c', 'd', or 'a', 'b', 'c' then 'd', 'e', 'f'? – Andrew Grimm Mar 26 '11 at 22:03
    
@Andrew Thanks for them pointing out. I fixed it. – sawa Mar 27 '11 at 1:50
    
sawa, finally I've used this approach. Only thing that I don't like here, that I can't get first and last con as [nil, a, b] and [d, e, nil] or whatever to determine first element as middle element. Because now I can't iterate properly, because I have got Array.count - 2 cons – fl00r Apr 4 '11 at 8:19
    
@fl00r I am glad that you're taking my solution. The problem you have is a minor thing: iterate over [nil, *original_array, nil] instead of original_array. – sawa Apr 4 '11 at 9:00

In ruby1.8, there is each_with_index.

If you want that on other iterators like inject, map, ..., and if you are using ruby1.9, there is Enumerator#with_index method that you can attach to various iterators.

Enumerator#with_index

share|improve this answer
    
so there is no way to know wich object is iterating and what was the priviouse and next value? – fl00r Mar 26 '11 at 20:07
    
Are you using ruby 1.9? If you use with_index, you can get both the object and the index. Using the index i, you can do array[i-1] to get the previous. You want even a simpler way to access the previous/next element? – sawa Mar 26 '11 at 20:08
    
Sorry, no. REE (1.8.7) – fl00r Mar 26 '11 at 20:08
    
I see. That may require some more idea. I don't have an answer to it right away. – sawa Mar 26 '11 at 20:11
    
Anyway thanks :) – fl00r Mar 26 '11 at 20:13

Ruby's each_with_index functionality can be recreated easily:

ary = %w[zero one two three]
ary.zip((0 .. (ary.size - 1)).to_a).to_a # => [["zero", 0], ["one", 1], ["two", 2], ["three", 3]]

ary.zip((0 .. (ary.size - 1)).to_a).each do |a, i|
  puts "this element: #{a}"
  puts "previous element: #{ary[i - 1]}" if (i > 0)
  puts "next element: #{ary[i + 1]}" if (i < (ary.size - 1))
  puts
end
# >> this element: zero
# >> next element: one
# >> 
# >> this element: one
# >> previous element: zero
# >> next element: two
# >> 
# >> this element: two
# >> previous element: one
# >> next element: three
# >> 
# >> this element: three
# >> previous element: two
# >> 

Once you know the index for the current object you can peek into the array you're iterating over and get the previous and next values easily.

So, you could do:

module Enumerable
  def my_each_with_index
    self.zip((0 .. (self.size - 1)).to_a).each do |a, i|
      yield a, i
    end
  end
end

ary.my_each_with_index { |a,i| puts "index: #{i} element: #{a}" }
# >> index: 0 element: zero
# >> index: 1 element: one
# >> index: 2 element: two
# >> index: 3 element: three
share|improve this answer
    
this is one of the most useful snippets of ruby wisdom I've found buried inside a low ranked answer to a StackOverflow question. – David West Mar 31 at 18:17

Can't test, but if remember correctly:

a = [4, 3, 3, 1, 6, 6,1]
p a.enum_for(:each_with_index).inject([]){ |m,args| m<<args }
#=> [[4, 0], [3, 1], [3, 2], [1, 3], [6, 4], [6, 5], [1, 6]]

Replace inject with select, reject or whatever. With Ruby 1.9:

p a.each_with_index.inject([]){ |m,args| m<<args }
share|improve this answer
1  
note that xs.inject([]) { |m, args| m << args } = xs.map { |x| x} = xs.to_a. Anyway, in Ruby 1.9 (and probably 1.8.7) you should be able to simply write a.each_with_index.to_a – tokland May 20 '11 at 17:41

Edit: This is for 1.9, I saw now that your question explicitly mentions 1.8.7. I'll leave it here for reference, but if it disturbs anyone I can delete it.

sawa already pointed out Enumerator#with_index:

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Enumerator.html#M000303

Examples:

>> [1,2,3].map.with_index { |x, i| [x,i] }
=> [[1, 0], [2, 1], [3, 2]]
>> [1,2,3].each_cons(2).with_index { |(x, y), i| p [x,y,i] }
[1, 2, 0]
[2, 3, 1]
=> nil

Also related to this question are Enumerator#next and Enumerator#peek, which will return the next object in the enumerator, with respectively without moving the internal position forward.

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Enumerator.html#M000307

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Enumerator.html#M000308

share|improve this answer
    
Rails 1.8.7? I believe it for 1.9 – fl00r Mar 26 '11 at 21:47
    
Yes, this is Ruby 1.9. Rails 1.8.7 is quite old btw. ;-) – Michael Kohl Mar 26 '11 at 21:48
1  
For 1.8.7, you can replace .map.with_index with .each_with_index.map. – Andrew Grimm Mar 26 '11 at 22:05
    
Of course you can, but I'd rather finally see everyone move on to 1.9. It's really been out for a while now and frankly there are not many excuses left for code still not working with the newest Ruby version. – Michael Kohl Mar 26 '11 at 23:38
    
I think it's peek, not poke. – sawa Mar 27 '11 at 1:58

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