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The HTML:

<a href='#' id='myLink1' class='areaLink activeArea' onClick="myFunction('1')">Click Me 1</a>
<a href='#' id='myLink2' class='areaLink activeArea' onClick="myFunction('2')">Click Me 2</a>

CSS:

.activeArea { font-weight: bold; }

I have the following code runny on document ready:

$(document).ready(function() {

    $('a.areaLink').click(function() {
        $('a.areaLink').removeClass('activeArea');
    });

});

And this code inside the function that executes on the onClick event:

function myFunction(num) {

    $('#myLink'+num).addClass('activeArea'); // !important

}

OK, so when the page initially loads, visually the links should look like this:

Click Me 1
Click Me 2

When the user clicks on either link, that link should become bold like so:

Click Me 1
Click Me 2

So how can I make this line within the function:

$('#myLink'+num).addClass('activeArea');

OVERIDE the code running on document ready?

share|improve this question
    
When the <a> tags are clicked, jQuery is removing the activeArea class, while myFunction is trying to add it back. It doesn't make any sense. What behavior are you trying to achieve? –  Anurag Mar 26 '11 at 21:12
    
@Anurag yes, I have to do it that way because I have other things happening on the onClick like ajax requests specific to other parameters that I will be passing through that function. That's why I can't use the examples people are posting. I need a jQuery's equivalent to the !important of CSS. –  Brandon Mar 26 '11 at 21:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Why don't you just remove the .removeClass() from the jQuery click event?

function myFunction(num) {
    $('a.areaLink').removeClass('activeArea');
    $('#myLink' + num).addClass('activeArea'); // !important
}
share|improve this answer
    
I did something similar except I did it in the document ready: $('a.areaLink').click(function() { $('a.areaLink').removeClass('activeArea'); $(this).addClass('activeArea'); }); –  Brandon Mar 26 '11 at 21:42

Remove the inline onclick from your a tags. You also do not need to have a function to reference the clicked link. Use $(this) instead.

$('.areaLink').click(function() {
    $(this).addClass('activeArea').siblings().removeClass('activeArea');
});

Check working example at http://jsfiddle.net/SVVJk/1/

share|improve this answer

Should work fine. on document ready only loads once.

Do you want it to be bold the next time the page is loaded for the user?

Also, I believe

$(this).addClass('activeArea'); 

Will work as well as the code you have there... you don't need to pass in a number and use this naming convention.

share|improve this answer

Change your html to this:

<a href='#' class='areaLink'>Click Me 1</a>
<a href='#' class='areaLink'>Click Me 2</a>

And this is all the JS you need:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('a.areaLink').bind('click', function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        var $this = $(this);
        if($this.hasClass('activeArea'))
            return;
        $this.siblings().removeClass('activeArea');
        $this.addClass('activeArea');
    });
});
share|improve this answer

You could simplify it all by doing the following:

<a href='#' id='myLink1' class='areaLink'>Click Me 1</a>
<a href='#' id='myLink2' class='areaLink'>Click Me 2</a>

And in your script:

 $('a.areaLink').click(function() {
   $(this).addClass('activeArea');
   $(this).siblings('.areaLink').removeClass('activeArea');
 });
share|improve this answer

I would recommend doing something like this:

<a href='#' id='myLink1' class='areaLink activeArea clicker' onClick="myFunction('1')">Click Me 1</a>
<a href='#' id='myLink2' class='areaLink activeArea clicker' onClick="myFunction('2')">Click Me 2</a>

notice the clicker class i have added to both.

now use this code

$(".clicker").click(function(){
   $(this).addClass("whatever_class_you_want_to_add");
});

This means you dont need to worry about the number, because it is already known by the target of $(this)

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