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I'm having problems with the following situation. I have three classes that are involved in this mixup. List, ListNode, City. I have a List<City *>, where the list will be made up of a set of ListNode<City *> (standard wrapper around the list nodes).

City is an abstract class, so there are several classes that inherit from it that could be placed in this list and accessed polymorphically. The List class has a getHead() method which returns a pointer to a ListNode that is the head.

Any city has a population, so to access the populations, I'd expect the following to work. It's not, thus my question. I broke it down into pieces to make it simpler along the way:

    ListNode<City *> *head= country->city_list->getHead();
    City *headnode = *head->getNode();

    cout << "Test: " << headnode->getPopulation() << endl;

getPopulation() returns an integer. country is defined as List<City*> *city; Any help on how I could figure out my problem would be greatly appreciated.

edit adding more code for better idea of what I'm working with. First, ListNode:

template <class T>
class ListNode
{
public:
    ListNode() {next = 0;node = 0;};

    ListNode(T *t) {node = t; next = 0;};

    ListNode(const ListNode &l)
    {
        //long copy constructor. snip.
    };

    T *getNode() const { return node; }
    ListNode *getNext() const { return next; };

private:
    T *node;
    ListNode *next;
};

Now, here is what might relevant in the List class..

template <class T>
class List
{
public:
    List()
    {
        head = 0;
        size = 0;
    };

    List(ListNode<T> *t)
    {
        head = t;
        size = 1;
    };

    List(T *t)
    {
        head = new ListNode<T>(t);
        size = 1;
    };

    List(const List<T> &t)
    {
        // long copy constructor. snip.
    };
    //bunch of irrelevent methods.


    ListNode<T> *getHead() const {return head;};

    List &operator+=(T &t)
    {
        this->insert(&t);
        size++;
        return (*this);
    };


private:
    List &insert(T *t)
    {
        ListNode<T> *current = head;
        if (current == 0)
        {
            head = new ListNode<T>(t);
        }
        else
        {
            while (current->getNext() != 0)
            {
                current = current->getNext();
            }
            current->setNext(new ListNode<T>(t));
        }
        return (*this);
    };

    ListNode<T> *head;
    int size;
};

I have a hunch that the process of inserting might be the problem. I insert with the List class's += operator, shown in the List implementation above. It calls the private insert method shown above, as well. It looks like this: City *somecity = new City(x,y,z); //some parameters. integers. *city_list += somecity; // where city_list is a List.

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4  
The only reason I can think of for implementing your own List instead of using std::list is homework. If that is the case, please add the homework tag. If not, think really hard if you could not simply use std::list or std::vector. –  Björn Pollex Mar 26 '11 at 21:50
    
But...what actually is not working? What errors do you get? What is blah? –  pajton Mar 26 '11 at 21:51
3  
What are the errors you get? –  Karel Petranek Mar 26 '11 at 21:53
2  
@Space_C0wb0y - Not legitimately homework. At least not school homework. I've been spending the past 2 days or so trying to refresh on my C++, and I'm using these examples as learning tools. With that said, feel free to treat it as you would treat any other homework, since that is the best way for me to learn –  vapo Mar 26 '11 at 21:53
1  
It will work just fine. City is just a template arg. You use T* everywhere in your code, so you'll end up with City* when accessing anyway. Which is what you want. –  pajton Mar 26 '11 at 22:46

2 Answers 2

I think you've got a variable scoping problem.

Your ListNode class contains a pointer to the node value. Your ListNode constructor takes in a pointer to the node value and saves it.

The problem is if that pointer is to a local variable that then goes out of scope. Your ListNode's node pointer is now pointing to an object that doesn't exist. e.g. in this example

addToList(List<int>& myList)
{
    int x = 3;
    myList += x;  // pointer to x is in the list
}
// Out of scope; x no longer exists, but myList has a pointer to it.
// Accessing this node will result in an error.

There are a couple possible remedies:

  1. Have your ListNode contain values rather than pointers. The drawback here is that you will be making copies of the values
  2. Implement ListNode using a reference counted smart pointer which will manager the lifetime of the object.
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Is this an issue if I'm always allocating on the heap though? I figure if you never add a local variable to the list, it should be fine? Or is there a deeper issue? –  vapo Mar 26 '11 at 22:36
    
If you're always using the heap, you would only get in trouble if the pointer gets deleted. So this may not be the problem, but it would still be a problem with the class design because it is very easy to use incorrectly. –  JohnMcG Mar 26 '11 at 22:40

Well, what you could do is:

ListNode<City *>* head = new ListNode<City*>(country->city_list->getHead());
City* headnode = head->getNode();

cout << "Test: " << headnode->getPopulation() << endl;

It will take the existing City (on the memory) and put it at the head of the List node, and so on.

and if you want to copy them, maybe you could just make this:

ListNode<City *>* head = new ListNode<City*>*(new City(country->city_list->getHead()));
City* headnode = new City(head->getNode());

cout << "Test: " << headnode->getPopulation() << endl;

Hope it will help you.

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