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Is there any simple way of determining whether or not a certain activity is active? I want to do certain things depending on which activity is active. eg:

if(activityrunning= activity1)
//do this
else if (activityrunning= activity2)
//do something else
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11 Answers 11

up vote 63 down vote accepted

you can use a static variable within the activity.

class MyActivity extends Activity {
     static boolean active = false;

      @Override
      public void onStart() {
         super.onStart();
         active = true;
      } 

      @Override
      public void onStop() {
         super.onStop();
         active = false;
      }
}

the only gotcha is that if you use it in two activitys that link to each other then onStop on the first is sometimes called after onStart in second. So both might be true briefly.

depending on what you are trying to do (update the current activityform a service?). you could just register a static listener in the service in you activitys onStart method then the correct listener will be available when your service wants to update the UI.

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1  
Some one pointed this out to me that..Sharedpreference should be preferred over a static variable due to memory leak problems. –  Ayush Goyal Apr 17 '13 at 19:58
4  
What if there are different activities of the same class running? What if you extend MyActivity with MyChildactivity and want to check if the child is active? –  Mister Smith Sep 2 '13 at 10:27
    
Simply great answer ! –  Salman Muhammad Ayub Sep 6 '13 at 8:11
    
constantly fails –  deej Nov 21 '13 at 20:08
1  
Depending on your definition of "running" you might want to change the state of the variable in onResume and onPause.... –  G. Blake Meike Aug 15 '14 at 20:51

I think more clear like that:

  public boolean isRunning(Context ctx) {
        ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager) ctx.getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
        List<RunningTaskInfo> tasks = activityManager.getRunningTasks(Integer.MAX_VALUE);

        for (RunningTaskInfo task : tasks) {
            if (ctx.getPackageName().equalsIgnoreCase(task.baseActivity.getPackageName())) 
                return true;                                  
        }

        return false;
    }
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1  
I try to avoid making temporary variables before a 'for' loop; for (RunningTaskInfo task: ActivityManager.getRunningTasks(Integer.MAX_VALUE)) { ... –  mikebabcock May 31 '12 at 21:26
1  
as usual, is a methode that you can call inside your class as a 'function' do you need an example? –  Xenione Nov 12 '12 at 11:41
7  
this code will require android.permission.GET_TASKS –  Can Elmas Jan 10 '14 at 13:12
4  
From developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… "This should never be used for core logic in an application, such as deciding between different behaviors based on the information found here. Such uses are not supported, and will likely break in the future." –  joe_deniable Apr 13 '14 at 8:29
1  
As of API level 21 (Android 5.0 Lollipop) this method has been deprecated. –  AxeEffect Nov 11 '14 at 3:48

This is code for checking whether a particular service is running. I'm fairly sure it can work for an activity too as long as you change getRunningServices with getRunningAppProcesses() or getRunningTasks(). Have a look here http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/ActivityManager.html#getRunningAppProcesses()

Change Constants.PACKAGE and Constants.BACKGROUND_SERVICE_CLASS accordingly

    public static boolean isServiceRunning(Context context) {

    Log.i(TAG, "Checking if service is running");

    ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager)context.getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);

    List<RunningServiceInfo> services = activityManager.getRunningServices(Integer.MAX_VALUE);

    boolean isServiceFound = false;

    for (int i = 0; i < services.size(); i++) {

        if (Constants.PACKAGE.equals(services.get(i).service.getPackageName())){

            if (Constants.BACKGROUND_SERVICE_CLASS.equals(services.get(i).service.getClassName())){
                isServiceFound = true;
            }
        }
    }

    Log.i(TAG, "Service was" + (isServiceFound ? "" : " not") + " running");

    return isServiceFound;

}
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But bear in mind that the link you provide states "this method is only intended for debugging or building a user-facing process management UI." –  joe_deniable Apr 13 '14 at 8:31

thanks kkudi! I was able to adapt your answer to work for an activity... here's what worked in my app..

public boolean isServiceRunning() { 

ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager)Monitor.this.getSystemService (Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE); 
    List<RunningTaskInfo> services = activityManager.getRunningTasks(Integer.MAX_VALUE); 
    isServiceFound = false; 
    for (int i = 0; i < services.size(); i++) { 
        if (services.get(i).topActivity.toString().equalsIgnoreCase("ComponentInfo{com.lyo.AutoMessage/com.lyo.AutoMessage.TextLogList}")) {
            isServiceFound = true;
        }
    } 
    return isServiceFound; 
} 

this example will give you a true or false if the topActivity matches what the user is doing. So if the activity your checking for is not being displayed (i.e. is onPause) then you won't get a match. Also, to do this you need to add the permission to your manifest..

<uses-permission  android:name="android.permission.GET_TASKS"/>

I hope this was helpful!

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I used MyActivity.class and getCanonicalName method and I got answer.

protected Boolean isActivityRunning(Class activityClass)
{
        ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager) getBaseContext().getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
        List<ActivityManager.RunningTaskInfo> tasks = activityManager.getRunningTasks(Integer.MAX_VALUE);

        for (ActivityManager.RunningTaskInfo task : tasks) {
            if (activityClass.getCanonicalName().equalsIgnoreCase(task.baseActivity.getClassName()))
                return true;
        }

        return false;
}
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There is much easier way than everything above and this approach does not require the use of android.permission.GET_TASKS in the manifest, or have the issue of race conditions or memory leaks pointed out in the accepted answer.

  1. Make a STATIC variable in the main Activity. Static allows other activity to receive the data from another activity. onPause() set this variable false, onResume && onCreate() set this variable true.

     private static boolean mainActivityIsOpen;
    
  2. assign getters and setters of this variable.

    public static boolean mainActivityIsOpen() {
    return mainActivityIsOpen;
    

    }

    public static void mainActivityIsOpen(boolean mainActivityIsOpen) {
    DayView.mainActivityIsOpen = mainActivityIsOpen;
    

    }

  3. And then from another activity or Service

     if (MainActivity.mainActivityIsOpen() == false)
    {
                    //do something
    }
     else if(MainActivity.mainActivityIsOpen() == true)
    {//or just else. . . ( or else if, does't matter)
            //do something
    }
    
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2  
Are you saying that using accessor methods is better than using raw public static variables? –  Igor Ganapolsky Feb 4 '13 at 23:58
    
In Java it is better to use setters and getters to keep your variables private. However, I believe that in Android it is common to access public variables directly... –  Stephen Apr 11 '13 at 12:36
6  
It makes no sense to have a public setter since activity state should be handled only by the activity itself. You should stick with java naming conventions: isActivityOpen would be a correct getter method. Also using if boolean == true is redundant. Besides that, delegating state management to the activity is the best approach. –  Lisandro May 28 '13 at 12:31
4  
this is why u should have attended your courses more diligently @coolcool ;) –  Jerec TheSith Aug 27 '13 at 13:45
1  
And what if you have multiple instances of the activity running? –  nickmartens1980 Aug 20 '14 at 10:34

Not sure it is a "proper" way to "do things".
If there's no API way to resolve the (or a) question than you should think a little, maybe you're doing something wrong and read more docs instead etc.
(As I understood static variables is a commonly wrong way in android. Of cause it could work, but there definitely will be cases when it wont work[for example, in production, on million devices]).
Exactly in your case I suggest to think why do you need to know if another activity is alive?.. you can start another activity for result to get its functionality. Or you can derive the class to obtain its functionality and so on.
Best Regards.

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If you are interested in the lifecycle state of the specific instance of the activity, siliconeagle's solution looks correct except that the new "active" variable should be an instance variable, rather than static.

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Shared Preferences can be used to share variables with other activities and services from one application

    public class example extends Activity {

    @Override
    protected void onStart() {
        super.onStart();

        // Store our shared preference
        SharedPreferences sp = getSharedPreferences("OURINFO", MODE_PRIVATE);
        Editor ed = sp.edit();
        ed.putBoolean("active", true);
        ed.commit();
    }

    @Override
    protected void onStop() {
        super.onStop();

        // Store our shared preference
        SharedPreferences sp = getSharedPreferences("OURINFO", MODE_PRIVATE);
        Editor ed = sp.edit();
        ed.putBoolean("active", false);
        ed.commit();

    }
}

Use shared preferences. It has the most reliable state information, less application switch/destroy issues, saves us to ask for yet another permission and it gives us more control to decide when our activity is actually the topmost. see details here abd here also

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Use an ordered broadcast. See http://android-developers.blogspot.nl/2011/01/processing-ordered-broadcasts.html

In your activity, register a receiver in onStart, unregister in onStop. Now when for example a service needs to handle something that the activity might be able to do better, send an ordered broadcast from the service (with a default handler in the service itself). You can now respond in the activity when it is running. The service can check the result data to see if the broadcast was handled, and if not take appropriate action.

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An option without using any auxiliar variable is:

Activity#getWindow().getDecorView().getRootView().isShown()

The value returned by this expression changes in onStart() / onStop(), which are the events that start / stop showing the layout of the activity on the phone.

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