Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using a debugging aid in an application that uses var_dump() with output buffering to capture variables and display them. However, I'm running into an issue with large objects that end up using up too much memory in the buffer.

function getFormattedOutput(mixed $var) {
  if (isTooLarge($var)) { 
    return 'Too large! Abort!'; // What a solution *might* look like
  }

  ob_start();
  var_dump($var); // Fatal error:  Allowed memory size of 536870912 bytes exhausted
  $data = ob_get_clean();

  // Return the nicely-formated data to use later
  return $data
}

Is there a way I can prevent this? Or a work-around to detect that it's about to output a gigantic amount of info for a particular variable? I don't really have control which variables get passed into this function. It could be any type.

share|improve this question
    
Do you get the same problem with print_r, out of curiosity? If not, do you see lots of recursion notices? –  Charles Mar 27 '11 at 1:42
    
@Charles, probably not. I could use print_r or var_export but I really like the fact that I can retain the variable type and length info provided by var_dump. Also the added formatting benefits when xdebug is available. –  Mike B Mar 27 '11 at 1:45
    
It's probably an infinite amount of output due to recursion. Try calling it yourself on the same var without using output buffering to see what happens. –  Jon Mar 27 '11 at 1:45
    
@Jon: var_dump can resolve recursion references. –  zerkms Mar 27 '11 at 1:58
1  
@Nelson Since php uses copy-on-write how would that help since I'm not changing $var? –  Mike B Dec 12 '12 at 20:42
show 7 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted
+100

Well, if the physical memory is limited (you see the fatal error:)

Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 536870912 bytes exhausted

I would suggest to do the output buffering on disk (see callback parameter on ob_start). Output buffering works chunked, that means, if there still is enough memory to keep the single chunk in memory, you can store it into a temporary file.

// handle output buffering via callback, set chunksize to one kilobyte
ob_start($output_callback, $chunk_size = 1024);

However you must keep in mind that this will only prevent the fatal error while buffering. If you now want to return the buffer, you still need to have enough memory or you return the file-handle or file-path so that you can also stream the output.

However you can use that file then to obtain the size in bytes needed. The overhead for PHP strings is not much IIRC, so if there still is enough memory free for the filesize this should work well. You can substract offset to have a little room and play safe. Just try and error a little what it makes.

Some Example code (PHP 5.4):

<?php
/**
 * @link http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5446647/how-can-i-use-var-dump-output-buffering-without-memory-errors/
 */

class OutputBuffer
{
    /**
     * @var int
     */
    private $chunkSize;

    /**
     * @var bool
     */
    private $started;

    /**
     * @var SplFileObject
     */
    private $store;

    /**
     * @var bool Set Verbosity to true to output analysis data to stderr
     */
    private $verbose = true;

    public function __construct($chunkSize = 1024) {
        $this->chunkSize = $chunkSize;
        $this->store     = new SplTempFileObject();
    }

    public function start() {
        if ($this->started) {
            throw new BadMethodCallException('Buffering already started, can not start again.');
        }
        $this->started = true;
        $result = ob_start(array($this, 'bufferCallback'), $this->chunkSize);
        $this->verbose && file_put_contents('php://stderr', sprintf("Starting Buffering: %d; Level %d\n", $result, ob_get_level()));
        return $result;
    }

    public function flush() {
        $this->started && ob_flush();
    }

    public function stop() {
        if ($this->started) {
            ob_flush();
            $result = ob_end_flush();
            $this->started = false;
            $this->verbose && file_put_contents('php://stderr', sprintf("Buffering stopped: %d; Level %d\n", $result, ob_get_level()));
        }
    }

    private function bufferCallback($chunk, $flags) {

        $chunkSize = strlen($chunk);

        if ($this->verbose) {
            $level     = ob_get_level();
            $constants = ['PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_START', 'PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_WRITE', 'PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_FLUSH', 'PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_CLEAN', 'PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_FINAL'];
            $flagsText = '';
            foreach ($constants as $i => $constant) {
                if ($flags & ($value = constant($constant)) || $value == $flags) {
                    $flagsText .= (strlen($flagsText) ? ' | ' : '') . $constant . "[$value]";
                }
            }

            file_put_contents('php://stderr', "Buffer Callback: Chunk Size $chunkSize; Flags $flags ($flagsText); Level $level\n");
        }

        if ($flags & PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_FINAL) {
            return TRUE;
        }

        if ($flags & PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_START) {
            $this->store->fseek(0, SEEK_END);
        }

        $chunkSize && $this->store->fwrite($chunk);

        if ($flags & PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_FLUSH) {
            // there is nothing to d
        }

        if ($flags & PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_CLEAN) {
            $this->store->ftruncate(0);
        }

        return "";
    }

    public function getSize() {
        $this->store->fseek(0, SEEK_END);
        return $this->store->ftell();
    }

    public function getBufferFile() {
        return $this->store;
    }

    public function getBuffer() {
        $array = iterator_to_array($this->store);
        return implode('', $array);
    }

    public function __toString() {
        return $this->getBuffer();
    }

    public function endClean() {
        return ob_end_clean();
    }
}


$buffer  = new OutputBuffer();
echo "Starting Buffering now.\n=======================\n";
$buffer->start();

foreach (range(1, 10) as $iteration) {
    $string = "fill{$iteration}";
    echo str_repeat($string, 100), "\n";
}
$buffer->stop();

echo "Buffering Results:\n==================\n";
$size = $buffer->getSize();
echo "Buffer Size: $size (string length: ", strlen($buffer), ").\n";
echo "Peeking into buffer: ", var_dump(substr($buffer, 0, 10)), ' ...', var_dump(substr($buffer, -10)), "\n";

Output:

STDERR: Starting Buffering: 1; Level 1
STDERR: Buffer Callback: Chunk Size 1502; Flags 1 (PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_START[1]); Level 1
STDERR: Buffer Callback: Chunk Size 1503; Flags 0 (PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_WRITE[0]); Level 1
STDERR: Buffer Callback: Chunk Size 1503; Flags 0 (PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_WRITE[0]); Level 1
STDERR: Buffer Callback: Chunk Size 602; Flags 4 (PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_FLUSH[4]); Level 1
STDERR: Buffer Callback: Chunk Size 0; Flags 8 (PHP_OUTPUT_HANDLER_FINAL[8]); Level 1
STDERR: Buffering stopped: 1; Level 0
Starting Buffering now.
=======================
Buffering Results:
==================
Buffer Size: 5110 (string length: 5110).
Peeking into buffer: string(10) "fill1fill1"
 ...string(10) "l10fill10\n"
share|improve this answer
    
You can just fpassthru the resulting file, which will do chunked read/write/flush, and doesn't take up a ton of memory. –  Leigh Dec 19 '12 at 10:23
2  
@Leigh: Yes, that would be possible. I now did a proof of concept, not using a file-handle but a SplTempFileObject. Technically a tmp:// would be equally possible, probably even better. Anyway for the proof of concept it works. SplTempFileObject and tmp:// allow to even stream partially to memory first and if more memory is used they put it on disk. That is probably most wanted. E.g. keeping dumps up to 1 MB or similar in memory, larger ones on disk. –  hakre Dec 19 '12 at 14:45
    
I did undergo this now some more testing. Do not expect it to work with var_dump when Xdebug is enabled. This does not work because Xdebug causes the whole var_dump output to be send at once and not in chunks as it is common (see: codepad.viper-7.com/PVI5qT - test by @DaveRandom). Some changed code and test is here: gist.github.com/4341870 - the original idea is still the same, I just don't want to edit the question yet. –  hakre Dec 20 '12 at 0:11
    
@hakre Wow! That explains why the callback wasn't working when I originally posted the question! I'd like to know more about why var_dump returns everything when xdebug is installed but I feel like that's another question :) –  Mike B Dec 20 '12 at 4:20
add comment

As all the others are mentioning what you ask is impossible. The only thing you can do is try to handle it as good as possible.

What you can try is to split it up into smaller pieces and then combine it. I've created a little test to try and get the memory error. Obviously a real world example might behave differently, but this seems to do the trick.

<?php
define('mem_limit', return_bytes(ini_get('memory_limit'))); //allowed memory

/*
SIMPLE TEST CLASS
*/
class test { }
$loop = 260;
$t = new Test();
for ($x=0;$x<=$loop;$x++) {
  $v = 'test'.$x;
  $t->$v = new Test();
  for ($y=0;$y<=$loop;$y++) {
    $v2 = 'test'.$y;
    $t->$v->$v2 = str_repeat('something to test! ', 200);
  }
}
/* ---------------- */


echo saferVarDumpObject($t);

function varDumpToString($v) {
  ob_start();
  var_dump($v);
  $content = ob_get_contents();
  ob_end_clean();
  return $content;
}

function saferVarDumpObject($var) {
  if (!is_object($var) && !is_array($var))
    return varDumpToString($var);

  $content = '';
  foreach($var as $v) {
    $content .= saferVarDumpObject($v);
  }
  //adding these smaller pieces to a single var works fine.
  //returning the complete larger piece gives memory error

  $length = strlen($content);
  $left = mem_limit-memory_get_usage(true);

  if ($left>$length)
    return $content; //enough memory left

  echo "WARNING! NOT ENOUGH MEMORY<hr>";
  if ($left>100) {
    return substr($content, 0, $left-100); //100 is a margin I choose, return everything you have that fits in the memory
  } else {
    return ""; //return nothing.
  }  
}

function return_bytes($val) {
    $val = trim($val);
    $last = strtolower($val[strlen($val)-1]);
    switch($last) {
        // The 'G' modifier is available since PHP 5.1.0
        case 'g':
            $val *= 1024;
        case 'm':
            $val *= 1024;
        case 'k':
            $val *= 1024;
    }

    return $val;
}
?>

UPDATE The version above still has some error. I recreated it to use a class and some other functions

  • Check for recursion
  • Fix for single large attribute
  • Mimic var_dump output
  • trigger_error on warning to be able to catch/hide it

As shown in the comments, the resource identifier for a class is different from the output of var_dump. As far as I can tell the other things are equal.

<?php  
/*
RECURSION TEST
*/
class sibling {
  public $brother;
  public $sister;
}
$brother = new sibling();
$sister = new sibling();
$brother->sister = $sister;
$sister->sister = $brother;
Dump::Safer($brother);


//simple class
class test { }

/*
LARGE TEST CLASS - Many items
*/
$loop = 260;
$t = new Test();
for ($x=0;$x<=$loop;$x++) {
  $v = 'test'.$x;
  $t->$v = new Test();
  for ($y=0;$y<=$loop;$y++) {
    $v2 = 'test'.$y;
    $t->$v->$v2 = str_repeat('something to test! ', 200);
  }
}
//Dump::Safer($t);
/* ---------------- */


/*
LARGE TEST CLASS - Large attribute
*/
$a = new Test();
$a->t2 = new Test();
$a->t2->testlargeattribute = str_repeat('1', 268435456 - memory_get_usage(true) - 1000000);
$a->smallattr1 = 'test small1';
$a->smallattr2 = 'test small2';
//Dump::Safer($a);
/* ---------------- */

class Dump
{
  private static $recursionhash;
  private static $memorylimit;
  private static $spacing;
  private static $mimicoutput = true;


  final public static function MimicOutput($v) {
    //show results similar to var_dump or without array/object information
    //defaults to similar as var_dump and cancels this on out of memory warning
    self::$mimicoutput = $v===false ? false : true;
  }

  final public static function Safer($var) {
    //set defaults
    self::$recursionhash = array();
    self::$memorylimit = self::return_bytes(ini_get('memory_limit'));

    self::$spacing = 0;

    //echo output
    echo self::saferVarDumpObject($var);
  }  

  final private static function saferVarDumpObject($var) {
    if (!is_object($var) && !is_array($var))
      return self::Spacing().self::varDumpToString($var);

    //recursion check
    $hash = spl_object_hash($var);
    if (!empty(self::$recursionhash[$hash])) {
      return self::Spacing().'*RECURSION*'.self::Eol();
    }
    self::$recursionhash[$hash] = true;


    //create a similar output as var dump to identify the instance
    $content = self::Spacing() . self::Header($var);
    //add some spacing to mimic vardump output
    //Perhaps not the best idea because the idea is to use as little memory as possible.
    self::$spacing++;
    //Loop trough everything to output the result
    foreach($var as $k=>$v) {
      $content .= self::Spacing().self::Key($k).self::Eol().self::saferVarDumpObject($v);
    }
    self::$spacing--;
    //decrease spacing and end the object/array
    $content .= self::Spacing().self::Footer().self::Eol();
    //adding these smaller pieces to a single var works fine.
    //returning the complete larger piece gives memory error

    //length of string and the remaining memory
    $length = strlen($content);
    $left = self::$memorylimit-memory_get_usage(true);

     //enough memory left?
    if ($left>$length)
      return $content;

    //show warning  
    trigger_error('Not enough memory to dump "'.get_class($var).'" memory left:'.$left, E_USER_WARNING);
    //stop mimic output to prevent fatal memory error
    self::MimicOutput(false);
    if ($left>100) {
      return substr($content, 0, $left-100); //100 is a margin I chose, return everything you have that fits in the memory
    } else {
      return ""; //return nothing.
    }  
  }

  final private static function Spacing() {
    return self::$mimicoutput ? str_repeat(' ', self::$spacing*2) : '';
  }

  final private static function Eol() {
    return self::$mimicoutput ? PHP_EOL : '';
  }

  final private static function Header($var) {
    //the resource identifier for an object is WRONG! Its always 1 because you are passing around parts and not the actual object. Havent foundnd a fix yet
    return self::$mimicoutput ? (is_array($var) ? 'array('.count($var).')' : 'object('.get_class($var).')#'.intval($var).' ('.count((array)$var).')') . ' {'.PHP_EOL : '';
  }

  final private static function Footer() {
    return self::$mimicoutput ? '}' : '';
  }

  final private static function Key($k) {
    return self::$mimicoutput ? '['.(gettype($k)=='string' ? '"'.$k.'"' : $k ).']=>' : '';
  }

  final private static function varDumpToString($v) {
    ob_start();
    var_dump($v);

    $length = strlen($v);
    $left = self::$memorylimit-memory_get_usage(true);

     //enough memory left with some margin?
    if ($left-100>$length) {
      $content = ob_get_contents();
      ob_end_clean();
      return $content;
    }
    ob_end_clean();

    //show warning  
    trigger_error('Not enough memory to dump "'.gettype($v).'" memory left:'.$left, E_USER_WARNING);

    if ($left>100) {
      $header = gettype($v).'('.strlen($v).')';
      return $header . substr($v, $left - strlen($header));
    } else {
      return ""; //return nothing.
    }  
  }

  final private static function return_bytes($val) {
      $val = trim($val);
      $last = strtolower($val[strlen($val)-1]);
      switch($last) {
          // The 'G' modifier is available since PHP 5.1.0
          case 'g':
              $val *= 1024;
          case 'm':
              $val *= 1024;
          case 'k':
              $val *= 1024;
      }

      return $val;
  }
}
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. How would this behave if an object property was abusively large, though? –  Charles Dec 19 '12 at 0:49
    
Tried and failed :) Updated with a more extensive version that seems to work. –  Hugo Delsing Dec 19 '12 at 9:37
add comment

When you insall xdebug you can limit how deep var_dump follows objects. In some software products you might encounter a kind of recursion, which bloats the output of var_dump. Other than that, you could raise the memory limit.

See http://www.xdebug.org/docs/display

share|improve this answer
3  
I appreciate the post, but answers that entail "Make it dump less" really only tackle the symptom, not the problem. This function could have a 10-dimensional array with only one element in each - that should be OK to dump. But classes with properties of other huge objects can cause problems at the 2nd level. I realize what I'm asking might be impossible –  Mike B Dec 14 '12 at 18:49
1  
Propably it's just a matter of how much physical memory you have. =) –  Jan. Dec 17 '12 at 10:02
add comment

I'm sorry, but I think there is no solution for your problem. You are asking for the determination of a size to prevent the memory allocation for that size. PHP can't give you an answer about "how much memory will it consume", as the ZVAL structs are created at the time of usage in PHP. Please refer to Programming PHP - 14.5. Memory Management for an overview of PHP's memory allocation internals.

You gave the correct hint "there can be anything in it" and this is the problem from my point of view. There is an architectural problem that leads to the case you describe. And I think you try to solve it on the wrong end.

For example: you can start with a switch for each type in php and try to set limits for each size. This lasts as long as nobody comes to the idea of changing the memory limit within the process.

Xdebug is a good solution as it keeps you application from exploding because of a (even non-business-critical) log function and it is a bad solution as you should no activate xdebug in production.

I think that a memory exception is the correct behavior and you should not try to work around it.

[rant]If the one who dumps a 50 megabytes or more string does not care about his/her app behavior, he/she deserves to suffer from it ;)[/rant]

share|improve this answer
    
This should be correct answer. If it is not possible then something is wrong with your approach... –  Ivan Marjanovic Dec 18 '12 at 15:16
add comment

I do not believe that there is any way to determine how much memory a specific function will eventually take up. One thing you can do is use memory_get_usage() to check how much memory the script is currently taking right before $largeVar is set, then compare it with the amount after. This will give you a good idea of the size of $largeVar, and you can run trials to determine what a maximum acceptable size limit would be before you exit gracefully.

You could also reimplement the var_dump() function yourself. Have the function walk through the structure and echo the resulting content as it is generated, or store it in a temp file, rather that storing a gigantic string in memory. This will allow you to get the same desired result, but without the memory problems you are encountering.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.