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I want to do something like the following:

<c:choose>
    <c:when test="${empty example1}">
    </c:when>
    <c:otherwise>
        <c:when test="${empty example2}">
        </c:when>
        <c:otherwise>
        </c:otherwise>              
    </c:otherwise>
</c:choose>

Is this even possible? I get an exception thrown when trying to run.

Thank you.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need to do it more like this:

<c:choose>
    <c:when test="${empty example1}"> 
        <!-- do stuff -->
    </c:when> 
    <c:otherwise> 
        <c:choose>
            <c:when test="${empty example2}"> 
                <!-- do different stuff -->
            </c:when> 
            <c:otherwise> 
                <!-- do default stuff -->
            </c:otherwise>
        </c:choose>
    </c:otherwise> 
</c:choose>

The verbosity shown here is a good example of why XML is a poor language for implementing multi-level conditional statements.

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Maybe so, but this level of verbosity isn't necessary. @BalusC has a more elegant and readable solution below. It means the same thing, because c:when followed by c:otherwise is the same as if-else if. –  hotshot309 Jun 26 '12 at 3:01
    
Fair enough, but even the alternate example is clunky and verbose. The c:choose adds nothing whatsoever of value in terms of human readability, for instance, nor does having to specify the logical condition as test=, and so on. My example can be simplified, but XML is still a very poor language for representing if/elseif/else logic. –  aroth Jun 26 '12 at 3:48

You can use multiple <c:when>s in a <c:choose>.

<c:choose>
    <c:when test="${empty example1}">
    </c:when>
    <c:when test="${empty example2}">
    </c:when>
    <c:otherwise>
    </c:otherwise>              
</c:choose>
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1  
I respectfully disagree that this is always possible. The scenario I have displays a message in a form when users do not have a certain permissions. <c:otherwise> then shows a set of radio buttons if they do have those permissions. Nested inside that is another conditional radio button offered to a further subset of users. Thanks for a good discussion! –  noogrub Jul 12 '13 at 21:08
    
Hate to hijack, but can you please take a look at this? stackoverflow.com/questions/22622126/…. Thank you so much, and sorry again OP! Had to get someone's attention :) –  CodingInCircles Mar 24 '14 at 22:58

I agree with @BalusC--you can simplify the statement. Remember that c:when statements are mutually exclusive, like if-else if blocks.

The JSTL 1.2 spec states that c:choose must be the parent of at least one c:when statement, and that c:when must always precede at least one c:otherwise statement with the same immediate parent. Essentially, that also means that every c:when must have a c:otherwise following it inside a c:choose, and a c:choose must surround any c:when + c:otherwise. From what I can see, the spec does not refer to nesting c:choose elements, so I don't know whether it works--but I don't think you will ever be forced into nesting them.

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