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I have a query like this :

SELECT * FROM table1 t1
JOIN table2 t2 ON t1.id = t2.id 
     AND t2.time IN (SELECT year FROM activeYears WHERE active = 1)

Where activeYears.year is NVARCHAR(50), each year is a row.

Why is that join's run time faster than this query :

SELECT * FROM table1 t1
JOIN table2 t2 ON t1.id = t2.id AND t2.time IN ('2009','2010')

This is short, simple version, basically I have a large query with a join that uses a sub-query. When I change the sub-query to a string for testing, it takes double the time to run, even when clearing the cache. I think it might be a casting issue, but I tried declaring two variables as NVARCHAR(50) as well, and using them in the query and it made no difference.

It has just been puzzling me for a few days, and I don't understand why the sub-query is faster unless the query is actually built differently in some manner.

Thanks!


edit -- exec plan information

I diff'd the two execution plans, and will try to give you the anonymized highlights.

The MissingIndexes section of the execution plan for the faster (sub-query) query :

         <QueryPlan CachedPlanSize="196" CompileTime="2166" CompileCPU="2166" CompileMemory="18640">
            <MissingIndexes>
             <MissingIndexGroup Impact="41.4663">
                <MissingIndex Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table2]">
                 <ColumnGroup Usage="EQUALITY">
                   <Column Name="[time]" ColumnId="3" />
                    <Column Name="[id]" ColumnId="10" />
                  </ColumnGroup>
                </MissingIndex>
              </MissingIndexGroup>
            </MissingIndexes>

The MissingIndexes section of the query using a string for t2.time IN ('2009','2010')

           <MissingIndexes>
              <MissingIndexGroup Impact="35.4994">
                <MissingIndex Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table2]">
                  <ColumnGroup Usage="INEQUALITY">
                    <Column Name="[time]" ColumnId="3" />
                  </ColumnGroup>
                  <ColumnGroup Usage="INCLUDE">
                    <Column Name="[id]" ColumnId="10" />
                    <Column Name="[field1]" ColumnId="15" />
                  </ColumnGroup>
                </MissingIndex>
              </MissingIndexGroup>
              <MissingIndexGroup Impact="44.364">
                <MissingIndex Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table2]">
                  <ColumnGroup Usage="EQUALITY">
                    <Column Name="[time]" ColumnId="3" />
                    <Column Name="[id]" ColumnId="10" />
                  </ColumnGroup>
                  <ColumnGroup Usage="INCLUDE">
                    <Column Name="[field1]" ColumnId="15" />
                  </ColumnGroup>
                </MissingIndex>
              </MissingIndexGroup>
            </MissingIndexes>

And then there is a nested loop that is built differently in each plan, this is the nested loop that is drastically different, in the same order as above, first sub-query, then string version :

                <RelOp AvgRowSize="878" EstimateCPU="4.45867E-06" EstimateIO="0" EstimateRebinds="0" EstimateRewinds="0" EstimateRows="1.06667" LogicalOp="Left Outer Join" NodeId="1" Parallel="false" PhysicalOp="Nested Loops" EstimatedTotalSubtreeCost="4.44321">
                  <OutputList>
                     --SNIPPED--
                  </OutputList>
                  <NestedLoops Optimized="false">
                    <OuterReferences>
                      <ColumnReference Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table1]" Alias="[t1]" Column="time" />
                      <ColumnReference Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table1]" Alias="[t1]" Column="id" />
                    </OuterReferences>

The same nested loop, but from the second query :

                <RelOp AvgRowSize="878" EstimateCPU="0.223308" EstimateIO="0" EstimateRebinds="0" EstimateRewinds="0" EstimateRows="1.06667" LogicalOp="Left Outer Join" NodeId="1" Parallel="false" PhysicalOp="Nested Loops" EstimatedTotalSubtreeCost="4.66781">
                  <OutputList>
                    -- SNIPPED --
                  </OutputList>
                  <NestedLoops Optimized="false">
                    <Predicate>
                      <ScalarOperator ScalarString="[database].[dbo].[table1].[time] as [t1].[time]=[database].[dbo].[table2].[time] as [t2].[time] AND [database].[dbo].[table1].[id] as [t1].[id]=[database].[dbo].[table2].[id] as [t2].[id]">
                        <Logical Operation="AND">
                          <ScalarOperator>
                            <Compare CompareOp="EQ">
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Identifier>
                                  <ColumnReference Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table1]" Alias="[t1]" Column="time" />
                                </Identifier>
                              </ScalarOperator>
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Identifier>
                                  <ColumnReference Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table2]" Alias="[t2]" Column="time" />
                                </Identifier>
                              </ScalarOperator>
                            </Compare>
                          </ScalarOperator>
                          <ScalarOperator>
                            <Compare CompareOp="EQ">
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Identifier>
                                  <ColumnReference Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table1]" Alias="[t1]" Column="id" />
                                </Identifier>
                              </ScalarOperator>
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Identifier>
                                  <ColumnReference Database="[database]" Schema="[dbo]" Table="[table2]" Alias="[t2]" Column="id" />
                                </Identifier>
                              </ScalarOperator>
                            </Compare>
                          </ScalarOperator>
                        </Logical>
                      </ScalarOperator>
                    </Predicate>

And finally, same order, there is a piece of another, different nested loop that looks like it may make a difference because it seems to show how that section of the query is built, first the sub-query plan's version :

<ScalarOperator ScalarString="[database].[dbo].[table1].[id] as [t1].[id]=[database].[dbo].[table2].[id] as [t2].[id] AND [database].[dbo].[table1].[time] as [t1].[time]=[database].[dbo].[table2].[time] as [t2].[time] AND [database].[dbo].[table2].[time] as [t2].[time]&gt;=N'2009' AND [database].[dbo].[table2].[time] as [t2].[time]&lt;=N'2010'"> 

Then the string version, IN ('2009', '2010') :

<ScalarOperator ScalarString="[database].[dbo].[table2].[time] as [t2].[time]=N'2009' OR [database].[dbo].[table2].[time] as [t2].[time]=N'2010'">

2nd edit -- statistics information

Per request, here is SET STATISTICS TIME ON and SET STATISTICS IO ON, in the same order as above, sub-query first:

Table 'activeYear'. Scan count 2, logical reads 2010, physical reads 2, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table2'. Scan count 1, logical reads 2339848, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 2303, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table3'. Scan count 1016, logical reads 4624, physical reads 21, read-ahead reads 1047, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'Worktable'. Scan count 12, logical reads 109, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table4'. Scan count 1, logical reads 126, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 126, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table1'. Scan count 1033, logical reads 5331, physical reads 57, read-ahead reads 123, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table5'. Scan count 1, logical reads 219, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 219, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table6'. Scan count 1, logical reads 2, physical reads 2, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 10328 ms,  elapsed time = 11479 ms.

Then string

Table 'table2'. Scan count 1, logical reads 2339848, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 2303, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table3'. Scan count 1016, logical reads 4467, physical reads 21, read-ahead reads 1047, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'Worktable'. Scan count 659, logical reads 5863, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table4'. Scan count 1, logical reads 126, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 126, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table1'. Scan count 1033, logical reads 5228, physical reads 60, read-ahead reads 120, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table5'. Scan count 1, logical reads 219, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 219, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'activeYear'. Scan count 1, logical reads 2, physical reads 2, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'table6'. Scan count 1, logical reads 2, physical reads 2, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 16719 ms,  elapsed time = 17447 ms.

(There are a few more tables in this join than the simplified query, but it's only the string versus sub-query change on that single join I am concerned with... so hopefully that is isolated, since t1 joins separately to all the tables in this query.)

share|improve this question
    
Have you compared the plans? Did you test with SET STATISTICS IO ON and SET STATISTICS TIME ON? I guess the 2nd one tricks the Query Optimizer into starting with t2.time (thinking it smaller). The first looks like it would start with t1 then join to t2, because IN (subquery) is normally more expensive. –  RichardTheKiwi Mar 27 '11 at 5:28
    
There can be lots of reasons, check the query plan to get a hint. One guess is that the former can use an index where the latter can not. –  Albin Sunnanbo Mar 27 '11 at 5:45
    
what do you get if you execute: SELECT * FROM table1 t1 JOIN table2 t2 ON t1.id = t2.id WHERE t2.time IN ('2009','2010') –  Mitch Wheat Mar 27 '11 at 6:09
    
@Mitch It is much faster that way. It reverses when I do that, actually. Putting WHERE t2.time IN ('2009','2010') costs a bit more, but runs faster Putting WHERE t2.time IN (SELECT year FROM activeYears WHERE active = 1) costs a bit less, but returns results slower, as well. –  John Mar 27 '11 at 7:16
    
@Richard I added some statistics as you suggested. I'm not sure what worktable is, but it seems to be the biggest difference, unless I am missing something more important? –  John Mar 27 '11 at 7:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Educated guess: 1st query's IN is converted to JOIN:

SELECT * FROM table1 t1
JOIN table2 t2 ON t1.id = t2.id 
JOIN activeYears ay ON t2.time = ay.year 
WHERE ay.active = 1

while 2d query's IN is converted to OR (or even UNION):

SELECT * FROM table1 t1
JOIN table2 t2 ON t1.id = t2.id 
WHERE t2.time = '2009'
   OR t2.time = '2010'
share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense given those ScalarOperator tags, I see the OR being used. But in the faster query, it says [t2].[time]&gt;=N'2009' AND [t2].[time]&lt;=N'2010' ... it can't possibly know those are the only two possible values there, I can only assume it is using an index to know that there are no values between those two nvarchars that would get picked up by that query in error? (I might jump to the conclusion that it just knows there's nothing between 2009 and 2010, but the actual fields are slightly different than that, not even numeric. More like this "1982-1985" and "1986-2000".) –  John Mar 27 '11 at 8:08

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