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i m coding on android system, need to use the databases that have been pre-built by the system, such as the sms.db . and i just couldn't find any documents about the table structures and the meaning of the fields. been searching the android.com, haven't got a clue. so basically i've done a lot of inference to find out what the tables are and how to use them. it is way too time consuming. so can anybody tell me whether there are documents specifying all the database tables in the android system? thanks in advance.

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i m coding on android system, need to use the databases that have been pre-built by the system, such as the sms.db .

The "sms.db" is not part of the "android system". SMS messages are not stored by the Android operating system. SMS messages may be stored by an SMS client, and the Android open source project has such a client (Messenger). That client may or may not be installed on any device, and its database is subject to change.

An "android app" should not be using "sms.db" by any means.

so can anybody tell me whether there are documents specifying all the database tables in the android system?

Not that I am aware of. An "android app" cannot access any of these tables directly, anyway. Those that have documented and supported content providers are documented via the Android SDK.

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does that mean if i want to check what the fields are referring to, I have to check with the cell manufacturers documents for the sms client,as example? –  angus1985 Mar 28 '11 at 3:48
    
@angus1985: You are physically incapable of touching those databases except on a rooted phone. Such "documents for the sms client" most likely do not exist. –  CommonsWare Mar 28 '11 at 13:04

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