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I asked here: node.js require inheritance?

and was told that I can set variables to the global scope by leaving out the var.

This does not work for me.

ie:

_ = require('underscore');

Does not make the _ available on required files. I can set with express's app.set and have it available elsewhere though.

Can somebody confirm that this is supposed to work? Thanks.

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Where do you have the above line? –  Jan Hančič Mar 27 '11 at 7:31
1  
I think you should not start a new question if the answer to your previous question does not work. Rather add a comment there and remove the accepted tag. –  alienhard Mar 27 '11 at 7:45
    
@Jan Hančič server.js –  Harry Mar 27 '11 at 7:48
4  
Just editing it makes it appear in the currently active questions list. –  MAK Mar 27 '11 at 10:31
1  
Use exports. It's much much better. –  Emmerman Mar 30 '11 at 11:02
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2 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

GLOBAL._ = require('underscore')

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Could you provide a little bit more information please? Is this part of javascript or part of node? Is it a good pattern to follow? As in should I do this or should I use express set? Thanks –  Harry Mar 28 '11 at 3:34
2  
The previous comment is incorrect. In the browser, window is the global object. document is a property of window. –  gWiz Jul 13 '12 at 6:50
12  
This is NOT a good pattern to follow. Don't do this. The convention of using 'require' to decouple modules is well thought out. You shouldn't violate it without a darn good reason. See my response below. –  Dave Dopson Jul 30 '12 at 16:42
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In node, you can set global variables via the "global" or "GLOBAL" object:

GLOBAL._ = require('underscore'); // but you "shouldn't" do this! (see note below)

or more usefully...

GLOBAL.window = GLOBAL;  // like in the browser

From the node source, you can see that these are aliased to each other:

node-v0.6.6/src/node.js:
28:     global = this;
128:    global.GLOBAL = global;

In the code above, "this" is the global context. With the commonJS module system (which node uses), the "this" object inside of a module (ie, "your code") is NOT the global context. For proof of this, see below where I spew the "this" object and then the giant "GLOBAL" object.

console.log("\nTHIS:");
console.log(this);
console.log("\nGLOBAL:");
console.log(global);

/* outputs ...

THIS:
{}

GLOBAL:
{ ArrayBuffer: [Function: ArrayBuffer],
  Int8Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 1 },
  Uint8Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 1 },
  Int16Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 2 },
  Uint16Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 2 },
  Int32Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 4 },
  Uint32Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 4 },
  Float32Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 4 },
  Float64Array: { [Function] BYTES_PER_ELEMENT: 8 },
  DataView: [Function: DataView],
  global: [Circular],
  process: 
   { EventEmitter: [Function: EventEmitter],
     title: 'node',
     assert: [Function],
     version: 'v0.6.5',
     _tickCallback: [Function],
     moduleLoadList: 
      [ 'Binding evals',
        'Binding natives',
        'NativeModule events',
        'NativeModule buffer',
        'Binding buffer',
        'NativeModule assert',
        'NativeModule util',
        'NativeModule path',
        'NativeModule module',
        'NativeModule fs',
        'Binding fs',
        'Binding constants',
        'NativeModule stream',
        'NativeModule console',
        'Binding tty_wrap',
        'NativeModule tty',
        'NativeModule net',
        'NativeModule timers',
        'Binding timer_wrap',
        'NativeModule _linklist' ],
     versions: 
      { node: '0.6.5',
        v8: '3.6.6.11',
        ares: '1.7.5-DEV',
        uv: '0.6',
        openssl: '0.9.8n' },
     nextTick: [Function],
     stdout: [Getter],
     arch: 'x64',
     stderr: [Getter],
     platform: 'darwin',
     argv: [ 'node', '/workspace/zd/zgap/darwin-js/index.js' ],
     stdin: [Getter],
     env: 
      { TERM_PROGRAM: 'iTerm.app',
        'COM_GOOGLE_CHROME_FRAMEWORK_SERVICE_PROCESS/USERS/DDOPSON/LIBRARY/APPLICATION_SUPPORT/GOOGLE/CHROME_SOCKET': '/tmp/launch-nNl1vo/ServiceProcessSocket',
        TERM: 'xterm',
        SHELL: '/bin/bash',
        TMPDIR: '/var/folders/2h/2hQmtmXlFT4yVGtr5DBpdl9LAiQ/-Tmp-/',
        Apple_PubSub_Socket_Render: '/tmp/launch-9Ga0PT/Render',
        USER: 'ddopson',
        COMMAND_MODE: 'unix2003',
        SSH_AUTH_SOCK: '/tmp/launch-sD905b/Listeners',
        __CF_USER_TEXT_ENCODING: '0x12D732E7:0:0',
        PATH: '/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:~/bin:/usr/X11/bin',
        PWD: '/workspace/zd/zgap/darwin-js',
        LANG: 'en_US.UTF-8',
        ITERM_PROFILE: 'Default',
        SHLVL: '1',
        COLORFGBG: '7;0',
        HOME: '/Users/ddopson',
        ITERM_SESSION_ID: 'w0t0p0',
        LOGNAME: 'ddopson',
        DISPLAY: '/tmp/launch-l9RQXI/org.x:0',
        OLDPWD: '/workspace/zd/zgap/darwin-js/external',
        _: './index.js' },
     openStdin: [Function],
     exit: [Function],
     pid: 10321,
     features: 
      { debug: false,
        uv: true,
        ipv6: true,
        tls_npn: false,
        tls_sni: true,
        tls: true },
     kill: [Function],
     execPath: '/usr/local/bin/node',
     addListener: [Function],
     _needTickCallback: [Function],
     on: [Function],
     removeListener: [Function],
     reallyExit: [Function],
     chdir: [Function],
     debug: [Function],
     error: [Function],
     cwd: [Function],
     watchFile: [Function],
     umask: [Function],
     getuid: [Function],
     unwatchFile: [Function],
     mixin: [Function],
     setuid: [Function],
     setgid: [Function],
     createChildProcess: [Function],
     getgid: [Function],
     inherits: [Function],
     _kill: [Function],
     _byteLength: [Function],
     mainModule: 
      { id: '.',
        exports: {},
        parent: null,
        filename: '/workspace/zd/zgap/darwin-js/index.js',
        loaded: false,
        exited: false,
        children: [],
        paths: [Object] },
     _debugProcess: [Function],
     dlopen: [Function],
     uptime: [Function],
     memoryUsage: [Function],
     uvCounters: [Function],
     binding: [Function] },
  GLOBAL: [Circular],
  root: [Circular],
  Buffer: 
   { [Function: Buffer]
     poolSize: 8192,
     isBuffer: [Function: isBuffer],
     byteLength: [Function],
     _charsWritten: 8 },
  setTimeout: [Function],
  setInterval: [Function],
  clearTimeout: [Function],
  clearInterval: [Function],
  console: [Getter],
  window: [Circular],
  navigator: {} }
*/

** Note: regarding setting "GLOBAL._", in general you should just do var _ = require('underscore');. Yes, you do that in every single file that uses underscore, just like how in Java you do import com.foo.bar;. This makes it easier to figure out what your code is doing because the linkages between files are 'explicit'. Mildly annoying, but a good thing. .... That's the preaching.

There is an exception to every rule. I have had precisely exactly ONE instance where I needed to set "GLOBAL._". I was creating a system for defining "config" files which were basically JSON, but were "written in JS" to allow a bit more flexibility. Such config files had no 'require' statements, but I wanted them to have access to underscore (the ENTIRE system was predicated on underscore and underscore templates), so before evaluating the "config", I would set "GLOBAL._". So yeah, for every rule, there's an exception somewhere. But you had better have a darn good reason and not just "i get tired of typing 'require' so I want to break with convention".

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What are the downfalls of using GLOBAL? Why do I need a darn good reason? The bottom line is that my app works, right? –  trusktr Aug 14 '12 at 8:22
3  
ultimately, yes, if you ship, that's all that counts. However, certain practices are known as "best practices" and following them typically increases your odds of shipping and / or being able to maintain what you have built. The importance of following "good practice" increases with the size of the project and it's longevity. I've built all kinds of nasty hacks into short-lived projects that were write-once, read-never (and "single-developer"). In a bigger project, that sort of corner cutting ends up costing you project momentum. –  Dave Dopson Aug 14 '12 at 18:00
12  
Specifically, with GLOBAL, the issue is one of readability. If your program promiscuously uses global variables, it means that in order to understand the code, I must understand the dynamic runtime state of the entire app. This is why programmers are leery of globals. I'm sure there's dozens of ways to use them effectively, but we've mostly just seen them abused by junior programmers to the ill of the product. –  Dave Dopson Aug 14 '12 at 18:05
2  
Why can't you just put your configs in a regular .js file and call require before exporting the configs? –  Azat Jul 25 '13 at 0:15
1  
That's also a good question. Can't you just var config = require('config.js'); and export the "written in JS" object? –  trusktr Oct 11 '13 at 21:18
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