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I use this code for loading matrix:

 FILE *inputMatrix=fopen("file","r");
 fscanf(inputMatrix,"%d",&num);
 for(i=0;i<num;++i){
    for(j=0;j<num+1;++j){
        fscanf(inputMatrix,"%f",&A[i][j]);
    }
 }
 fclose(inputMatrix);
 int numRow=num;
 int numColumn=num+1;

and then I want to print it in main by method printMatrix:

void printMatrix(int numColumn, int numRow ,int matrix[numRow][numColumn]){
   int i = 0, j = 0;
   printf("nc: %i, nr: %i\n",numColumn,numRow);
    for(i = 0 ; i < numRow ; i++)
    {
        for(j = 0 ; j < numColumn ; j++)
        {
            printf("%.2f  ", matrix[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\n");
}

Here is the question. When I use in main: printf("matrix[1][1] is %f",matrix[1][1]) => it is loaded successfully from file, but when I try to print it by my method, which prints as well, I get 0.00 for every piece in matrix. Why so? Am I missing some referrence?

share|improve this question
    
Hello, is it possible to have a functional peace of code ? – Sandro Munda Mar 27 '11 at 10:05
    
Show us the main and the signature of the function for loading the matrix from the file. And why the second for is for(j=0;j<num+1;++j)? The matrix is Nx(N+1) ? – Kiril Kirov Mar 27 '11 at 10:06
    
Post your main() code, especially where file is loaded and printMatrix() is called. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 27 '11 at 10:06
    
It seems like your matrix variable not initialized, so check it. If possible put your full source code. – Pankaj Kumar Mar 27 '11 at 10:10
    
I have added my code, yes matrix is Nx(N+1) – Waypoint Mar 27 '11 at 10:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted
float A[10][11];

but...

void printMatrix(int numColumn, int numRow ,int matrix[numRow][numColumn]){

A float definition, but the method is expecting an int array. I'm stunned this compiled, but gcc threw off enough warnings that should give one pause:

$ gcc -o 5448492 5448492.c 
5448492.c:30: warning: conflicting types for ‘printMatrix’
5448492.c:24: note: previous implicit declaration of ‘printMatrix’ was here
5448492.c: In function ‘printMatrix’:
5448492.c:37: warning: format ‘%.2f’ expects type ‘double’, but argument 2 has type ‘int’

Because C requires all but the first array index to be known at compile time, you can make the program function by declaring a prototype for printMatrix() that includes the last array index size. (I got it wrong in my comment. Sorry.)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

void printMatrix(int numColumn, int numRow ,float matrix[][11]);

int main (int argc,char *argv[]) {

  int num;
  int i,j;
  float A[10][11];

  FILE *inputMatrix=fopen("yourfile.in","r");
  fscanf(inputMatrix,"%d",&num);
  int numRow=num;
  int numColumn=num+1;

  for(i=0;i<numRow;++i){
     for(j=0;j<numColumn;++j){
         fscanf(inputMatrix,"%f",&A[i][j]);
     }
  }
  fclose(inputMatrix);

  printMatrix(numColumn,numRow,A);

  return 0;
}


void printMatrix(int numColumn, int numRow ,float matrix[][11]){
   int i = 0, j = 0;
   printf("nc: %i, nr: %i\n",numColumn,numRow);
     for(i = 0 ; i < numRow ; i++)
     {
       for(j = 0 ; j < numColumn ; j++)
       {
         printf("%f  ", matrix[i][j]);
       }
       printf("\n");
     }
     printf("\n");
}

And the output:

$ ./5448492 
nc: 3, nr: 2
1.000000  1.000000  3.000000  
2.000000  2.000000  5.000000  

I fiddled with other stuff while tracking this one down (and standardized the indents at two spaces; it's awfully small, but consistency on non-favorite beats inconsistency every time), but I'm pretty sure the only thing I changed of substance was the prototype of the function to include the last array dimension.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I must be blind to oversee that... – Waypoint Mar 27 '11 at 10:15
1  
@Hmyzak, I was wrong in my earlier comment; all but the first index have to be known at compile time. See working code in answer. :) – sarnold Mar 27 '11 at 10:38
1  
@sarnold: Exactly and the first index must be passed as a parameter. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 27 '11 at 10:45
1  
In the function's declaration and definition: the numRow in [numRow][numColumn] and numColumn in [numColumn][11] are really ignored by the compiler. It's better to have float matrix[][11] to show that any matrix with 11 columns and any number of rows can be used. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 27 '11 at 11:00
1  
@ypercube, I waffled about leaving them in or not; on the one hand, they are documentation about how the function is supposed to be used. On the other hand, they mean nothing to the compiler, and that could cause confusion down the road. I think you're right though, I'll remove them. – sarnold Mar 27 '11 at 11:07

May be you should use double or float type for matrix array.

share|improve this answer
    
I am using float for the matrix array – Waypoint Mar 27 '11 at 10:12
    
void printMatrix(int numColumn, int numRow , float matrix[numRow][numColumn]) – FLCL Mar 27 '11 at 10:31

You have an integer matrix, therefore you should use %d instead of %f / %.2f for scanning/printing

share|improve this answer
    
I have to use %f because of print of matrix, which can have float numbers after some computing – Waypoint Mar 27 '11 at 10:14
    
In that case you have to change the parameter type of matrix to float also! – dcn Mar 27 '11 at 10:16
    
You are right, oh... I muste have been blind.... – Waypoint Mar 27 '11 at 10:17

SInce you use an array 10x11, 11 should be hard coded in other places as well. When passing a multidimensional array like this, all dimensions except the highest must be hard coded. Otherwise, you will get erroneous results.

The reason is that your functions think that the array has numColumn columns but the array in memory has actually 11 columns.

I would make these changes:

include ...
...

-- note the *float** and the **[11]**
void printMatrix(int numColumn, int numRow ,float matrix[][11]);

int main (int argc,char *argv[]) {

  int num;
  int i,j;
  float A[10][11];  
...
}

-- note the *float** and the **[11]**
void printMatrix(int numColumn, int numRow ,float matrix[][11]){
...
}
share|improve this answer

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