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Is there a clever way to vectorize a for-loop which assigns elements to submatrices of a matrix?
Initially, I had two for-loops:

U=zeros(6*(M-2),M-2);
for k=2:M-3  
    i=(k-1)*6+1; 
    for j=2:M-3
        U(i:i+5,j)=A*temp(i:i+5,j)+B*temp(i:i+5,j-1)+C*temp(i:i+5,j+1)+D*temp(i-6:i-1,j)+E*temp(i+6:i+11,j);
    end
end

Then I vectorized the inner loop, such that the code now reads

U=zeros(6*(M-2),M-2);
j=2:M-2;
for k=2:M-3
    i=(k-1)*6+1;
    U(i:i+5,j)=A*temp(i:i+5,j)+B*temp(i:i+5,j-1)+C*temp(i:i+5,j+1)+D*temp(i-6:i-1,j)+E*temp(i+6:i+11,j);
end

This has reduced my CPU time by more than 90%, so I wondered if I could do the same with the outer loop, but it seems a bit tricky, since I assign to (6x1)-matrices within the U matrix. I tried

U=zeros(6*(M-2),M-2);
k=2:M-3;
i=(k-1)*6+1;
j=2:M-2;
U(i:i+5,j)=A*temp(i:i+5,j)+B*temp(i:i+5,j-1)+C*temp(i:i+5,j+1)+D*temp(i-6:i-1,j)+E*temp(i+6:i+11,j);

but this fails, since i:i+5 only takes out the first 6 indices I want.

I have also tried to use the reshape() function to convert the matrix into a vector, but it still seems difficult to assign to several blocks of elements at once. There are in total three such for-loops in the code, so I guess an alternative optimization is to parallelize them somehow. However, without access to the parallel toolbox, vectorization seems to me as a good solution if possible.

The code is part of a subroutine in a numerical finite difference method for solving a system of 6 equations on a grid, so this question could be relevant for anyone working with matrix calculations on systems of equations, particularly PDEs. Suggestions to optimizing the code would be greatly appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To understand how you can write the assignment in one line without loops, it may help to draw the array temp as a rectangle. Then, the different summands that will combine to U are nothing but sub-rectangles of temp (or sub-grids, if you want to keep track of individual elements in temp that will result in a specific element of U) that are shifted to the left, right, top, bottom, respectively.

%# define row, column shifts
rowShift = 6;
colShift = 1;

%# That's how we'd like to shift 
%# U(i:i+5,j)=A*temp(i:i+5,j)+B*temp(i:i+5,j-1)+C*temp(i:i+5,j+1)+
%# D*temp(i-6:i-1,j)+E*temp(i+6:i+11,j);

%# assign U
U = A * temp(rowShift+1 : end-rowShift, colShift+1 : end-colShift) +... 
    B * temp(rowShift+1 : end-rowShift, 1 : end-2*colShift) + ...
    C * temp(rowShift+1 : end-rowShift, 2*colShift+1 : end) + ...
    D * temp(1 : end-2*rowShift, colShift+1 : end-colShift) + ...
    E * temp(2*rowShift+1 : end, colShift+1 : end-colShift);
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Thanks! As mentioned in the above comment, A, B..E are 6x6 matrices, so this doesn't work the way the A..E are implemented now. But by making sparse block diagonal matrices out of them (so that they act on each appropriate sub-array in temp), I think I shall make it work. I suppose this will speed up my code quite a lot... –  stein Mar 27 '11 at 20:04

In order to select a non-rectangular portion of a matrix, you need to use linear indices: in a 3x3 matrix A, A(3,3)==A(9), and A([1 3 5 7 9]) is a vector that can't be achieved through the row/column indexing method.

The sub2ind function converts row/column indices to linear indices, so you can use it in the form sub2ind(size(U),i:i+5,j) to get the linear indices of one block of U. Change your loop to do only the work of collecting the linear indices, and then you can say outside the loop:

U(ind_U) = A*temp(ind_A) + B*temp(ind_B) ...

Also, any time you are are dealing with FDM or FEM, consider whether you should be using sparse matrices.

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Thanks for your suggestion! I wasn't aware of this technique before. I should probably have mentioned that A, B..E above are 6x6 matrices (with the appropriate coefficient for each of the 6 functions),so I have to find a way to expand A..E to make this work, but your suggestion was very helpful! For the expanded version of A..E I suppose sparse is highly necessary... –  stein Mar 27 '11 at 19:38

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