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i am making an android widget which is active only when the screen is on, to prolong battery life. so i have one service which run all the time and reacts to ACTION_SCREEN_ON and ACTION_SCREEN_OFF. when the screen turns off i unregister other broadcast receivers and when the screen turns on i register them again.

my question is, what is the best practice, regarding battery life, to do when the screen turns off. is it better also to delete the broadcast receiver variables (i.e. m_Receiver = null;) or is unregistering enough? deleting means more free memory for the system, but causes garbage collection and extra memory operations (when the screen turns on i have to create a new receiver) which are expensive...

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1 Answer 1

i am making an android widget which is active only when the screen is on, to prolong battery life.

First, I am going to assume that by "widget" you mean "app widget".

Second, an app widget is never "active".

so i have one service which run all the time and reacts to ACTION_SCREEN_ON and ACTION_SCREEN_OFF.

This is not a good idea. First, you waste megabytes of RAM by keeping your process around. Second, it will not work, as Android will not let the service "run all the time" -- it will shut down your service for old age eventually. Third, users get irritated with developers like you who have services running all of the time, so they will kill off your service using a task killer (Android 2.1 and down) or by the Manage Services screen in the Settings application (Android 2.0 and higher).

when the screen turns off i unregister other broadcast receivers and when the screen turns on i register them again.

I have no idea what "other broadcast receivers" are. They probably should not be registered in the first place.

my question is, what is the best practice, regarding battery life, to do when the screen turns off. is it better also to delete the broadcast receiver variables (i.e. m_Receiver = null;) or is unregistering enough? deleting means more free memory for the system, but causes garbage collection and extra memory operations (when the screen turns on i have to create a new receiver) which are expensive...

Considering how much memory you are tying up with the service, worrying about this is pointless. Focus on getting rid of the everlasting service.

For example, suppose this app widget is showing battery level. Do not have an everlasting service that is watching ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED. Instead, let the user choose a polling period (e.g., once every five minutes) and use AlarmManager to check the battery level on a periodic basis.

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it is a widget only, no application. i am learning programming for android and as a first small project i am developing a battery widget so i register/unregister the ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED accroding to screen state. –  shelll Mar 27 '11 at 11:47
    
@shelll: "it is a widget only, no application" -- that is incorrect. First, please get the terminology right. The interactive elements of the home screen are each called an "app widget". A "widget" is a Button, CheckBox, etc. Second, anything you install on Android is an application. "so i register/unregister the ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED accroding to screen state" -- please do not have a service running all of the time. Please use AlarmManager to check the battery state periodically. –  CommonsWare Mar 27 '11 at 11:51
    
@shelll: To check the battery state without a BroadcastReceiver, call registerReceiver() with a null first parameter and an IntentFilter for ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED for the second parameter. Since ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED is a sticky broadcast, the return value from registerReceiver() will be the last-broadcast battery state. Read the values out of the Intent extras and update the app widget's RemoteViews. Do this from a manifest-registered BroadcastReceiver that is triggered by AlarmManager. –  CommonsWare Mar 27 '11 at 11:53
    
@CommonsWare: i have problems with previous reply, do not know how to make new paragraph and my edit took longer then the allowed limit. more info: i think that the alarm will be triggered many more times, then ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED, is it still a better way? the "alarm way" will not show precise battery state (e.g. charging status) all the time and users can complain. i will replace the receiver with alarm if you say it is better regarding battery life and user happiness. one more question. i set updatePeriodMillis to zero and in constructor start an alarm, which will not wake up the phone? –  shelll Mar 27 '11 at 12:24
    
@shelll: "i think that the alarm will be triggered many more times, then ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED" -- or many less times, depending on user configuration. "the 'alarm way' will not show precise battery state (e.g. charging status) all the time and users can complain" -- conceivably, but that's because they do not need your app widget, as there are already many other ways for them to determine battery level and charging status. "which will not wake up the phone" -- use an alarm type that does not have _WAKEUP on it, and it will not wake up the phone. –  CommonsWare Mar 27 '11 at 12:35

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