Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a native implementation of JSON in Windows that I can call from C? If not, what about .NET or C#? Or what if any library or implementation do people use when they wish to use JSON in a Windows app?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a built-in Windows JSON parser: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.script.serialization.javascriptserializer.aspx

It can be called from a native language using the .NET interop facilities (COM Callable Wrapper), which may be more work for you than a truly native library, as first answer suggests.

share|improve this answer
1  
How do you use that from C? –  David Heffernan May 3 '13 at 22:23
    
Sorry - let me clarify ("native" being overloaded). There is a managed .NET JSON parser that is part of the native Windows distro, which can be accessed from C using interop (CCW). –  Scott Jones May 3 '13 at 22:25
1  
You'll see that I have reverted the question back to the form it was in 2 years ago when I answered it. If @hippietrail wants to ask a different question then that different question would be a fit for your answer. –  David Heffernan May 3 '13 at 22:27
    
@DavidHeffernan I see, yes a bit confusing –  Scott Jones May 3 '13 at 22:29
    
Anyway, +1 for you answer! –  David Heffernan May 3 '13 at 22:31

There is a long list of such things on the JSON homepage. Take your pick.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah so no native API then. This will have to do (-: –  hippietrail Mar 29 '11 at 5:55
    
I'm pretty sure there is something native now but that it's pretty new, maybe Windows 8/RT only? I don't have either OS at this point ... –  hippietrail May 3 '13 at 22:16
    
Please don't change a two year old question to ask something completely different that makes an accepted answer look stupid. I reverted the question to the form that I answered two years ago. If you want to ask a different question, just ask a new question. –  David Heffernan May 3 '13 at 22:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.