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I have a script that is coded in the manner below. I want to run this as a background/daemon process however once I start the script, if then I close the terminal window that it was run from the program terminates. What do I need to do to keep the program running

loop do

  pid = fork do
    ..........
    ..........
    ..........
  end

  Process.detach(pid)
end
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up vote 9 down vote accepted

All the answers above fail to actually show how easy it is to do this:

# Daemonize the process and stay in the current directory
Process.daemon(true)

loop do
  pid = Process.fork do
    # Do something funky
  end

  Process.waitpid(pid)

  # Reduce CPU usage
  sleep(0.1)
end
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man nohup
nohup - run a command immune to hangups, with output to a non-tty

$ nohup command > output &

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This has been answered in details in this stackoverflow question: Create a daemon with double-fork in Ruby

Otherwise, there are a few gems out there to help abstract this out of your code, and in particular you can take a look at Raad (Ruby as a Daemon) https://github.com/colinsurprenant/raad which will also work with JRuby code (I am the author of Raad).

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Check out this screencast:

http://railscasts.com/episodes/129-custom-daemon

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Check out daemons.rb framework. This code might be useful (line 200):

https://github.com/ghazel/daemons/blob/master/lib/daemons/daemonize.rb

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I made a gem to do similar things. It's light and pretty easy to use imho. Hope it could help you.

http://rubygems.org/gems/light-daemon

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