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<input name="" type="button" value="300" onclick="document.all.t1.value=this.value" />
<input name="t1" type="text" id="t1"/><br />

<input name="" type="button" value="400" onclick="document.all.t2.value=this.value" />
<input name="t2" type="text"  id="t2"/><br />
<script>
function add(){
    document.getElementById("t3").value = Math.floor(document.getElementById("t1").value) +
                                          Math.floor(document.getElementById("t2").value);
}
</script>

<input name="" type="button" value="add" onclick="add" />
<input name="t3" type="text" id="t3"/>

the above code is bad., expect some to correct it. thank you.

when click 300, the 300 vill in the first textbox, the same as 400, then click add button. the third textbox shoew 700

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Where's your type parameter for the <script> tag? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 27 '11 at 14:07
    
What is not working about this? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 27 '11 at 14:08
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal the "type" attribute is pointless. –  Pointy Mar 27 '11 at 14:10
    
@Pointy: That article is all about <script> tags with the src attribute, where the mime-type of the retrieved script is already provided by the webserver. This inline code is an entirely different beast: for inline code, I couldn't disagree with that page more. It doesn't really explain why or how "the browser knows what to do". What nonsense. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 27 '11 at 14:15
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal the "type" attribute is optional in HTML5. Browsers reliably assume that the contents are JavaScript code. –  Pointy Mar 27 '11 at 14:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your "onclick" has to look like this:

<input name="" type="button" value="add" onclick="add()" />

References to document.all won't work in browsers other than Internet Explorer, so you should change those to use document.getElementById() instead.

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when i get the value, how to add them. how to write the add() function? thank you. why i use parseInt. it can't work? –  enjoylife Mar 27 '11 at 14:04
    
You already did write the "add()" function. –  Pointy Mar 27 '11 at 14:08
    
why i use parseInt. it can't work? –  enjoylife Mar 27 '11 at 14:09
    
I don't know what that means; you can use "parseInt()" if you want to, but calling "Math.floor()" (though a little weird) should work too - all you need to do is make sure the values are treated as numbers for the "+" operator. –  Pointy Mar 27 '11 at 14:11
1  
Have you fixed the "onclick" attribute of the "add" button yet? –  Pointy Mar 27 '11 at 14:14

You'll have to call the function rather than reference it.

That is, use:

<input name="" type="button" value="add" onclick="add()" />
                                                    /|\
                                                     |
-------------------------------------------------------
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<script type="text/javascript">
function add(){
    document.getElementById("t3").value = parseInt(document.getElementById("t1").value) +
                                          parseInt(document.getElementById("t2").value);
}
</script>
<input name="" type="button" value="300" onclick="document.getElementById('t1').value=this.value" />
<input name="t1" type="text" id="t1"/><br />

<input name="" type="button" value="400" onclick="document.getElementById('t2').value=this.value" />
<input name="t2" type="text"  id="t2"/><br />

<input name="" type="button" value="add" onclick="add()" />
<input name="t3" type="text" id="t3"/>

http://jsfiddle.net/AQYJh/

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