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  1. ^ is said to match the beginning of a line, but it does not match right after a "\n", "\r" or "\r\n". It matches the beginning of a string, though. In what sense does it match the beginning of a line, and how is it different from \A?

  2. $ is said to match the end of a line, but it does not match right before a "\n", "\r" or "\r\n". It matches the end of a string, though. In what sense does it match the end of a line, and how is it different from \z?

  3. \Z, unlike \z, matches right before "\n" if that is at the end of a string. It seems to me that \A and \z are naturally paired concept, and \Z is rather an odd one. Why is it that \Z and \z are defined as is, and not the other way around? And, when would you want to use \Z?

Can you illustrate the above using examples? If difference among languages/standards matters, it would be helpful to list them.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The difference is that the ^ and $ anchors can have modified behaviors.

With multiline mode on, the ^ and $ anchors assert the beginning and end of a line.

With multiline mode off, the ^ and $ anchors assert the beginning and end of the string.


Most regex implementations have a multiline mode.

With Ruby, Perl, or Javascript, it's defined with the m modifier. e.g. /pattern/m

In .NET it's defined with (?m) inside the pattern itself, or from the RegexOptions.Multiline enumeration.


To answer your 3rd question...

\A - The match must occur at the start of the string.

\Z - The match must occur at the end of the string or before \n at the end of the string.

\z - The match must occur at the end of the string.

These three are constants that are not affected by any modifiers. I agree that \A and \z seem to be an illogical pairing. It doesn't make a great deal of sense to me either. But in a case where you may have a trailing line feed that you wish to ignore then \Z might be preferred.

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+1 The multi-line modifier also works this way for PHP and Python as well. –  ridgerunner Mar 27 '11 at 19:12
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In Ruby, the m modifier denotes what most languages consider the s modifier (aka: DOT ALL). Quote: "/m makes the dot match newlines. Ruby indeed uses /m, whereas Perl and many other programming languages use /s for "dot matches newlines"." from: regular-expressions.info/ruby.html –  Bart Kiers Mar 27 '11 at 19:13
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Also, most PCRE-like regex implementations support inline modifiers, like (?m). This is not restricted to .NET. –  Bart Kiers Mar 27 '11 at 19:17
    
Thanks, folks. it is becoming clear. Do you have any idea about my third question? –  sawa Mar 27 '11 at 19:21
    
@sawa - There's not much to say about your 3rd question that you haven't already stated. But I did my best above. –  Steve Wortham Mar 27 '11 at 20:43

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