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I'd like to select the attribute from an XML element within an XML document using XPath.

My XML document is an instance of NSXMLDocument. Here is an example of the XML Document:

<rootnode>
  <mynode myattrib="getMe"></mynode>
</rootnode>

My XPath is something like:

//mynode@myattrib

This should return the value "getMe" (according to: http://www.bit-101.com/xpath/ ).

When I try to do this using:

[xmlDoc nodesForXpath:@"//mynode@myattrib" error:&error];

I get the following in error:

NSLog(@"%@",error);

Output:

XQueryError:3 - "invalid token (@) - //mynode@myattrib" at line:1

What should I change to get this to work? Is the @ symbol used in some other way?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Add a slash before the @, as in:

//mynode/@myattrib
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not familiar with XPath, what is the difference between dash and no dash? If it works in the example tool I put in the question, does that mean the tool is not working correctly? – RogeSoft Mar 27 '11 at 20:15
    
I'm not familiar with the tool you used, I just looked it up in my handy "XML in a nutshell" reference. :-) All of the examples there separate each axis of an XPath query with a slash. – Sherm Pendley Mar 27 '11 at 20:18
3  
@Rew - XPath expressions consist of one or more location steps separated by a slash. Each step selects the set of nodes that match that portion of the expression. Once you've selected mynode you need an additional step to select one of its attributes, which is why the slash is necessary. – Wayne Burkett Mar 27 '11 at 20:39
    
@lwburk Great, that helps. – RogeSoft Mar 28 '11 at 7:55

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