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I need help about that script.

BOOL Checking(LPCSTR MacID) {
    char ClientMacs[18] = { "11:22:33:44:55:66",};

    for(int x=0; x < 10; x++) {
        if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs[x])) {
            printf(MacID," Successed!");
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

I'm getting

error C2664: 'strcmp' : cannot convert parameter 2 from 'char' to 'const char *' Conversion from integral type to pointer type requires reinterpret_cast, C-style cast or function-style cast

when I try to compile it.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not

if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs[x])) {    }

but

if(!strcmp(MacID, &ClientMacs[x])) { ... }

Arg 2 has to be a char *, but you have it as char. If your arg 2 were plain

  ClientMacs  // compiler understands that this is shorthand for &ClientMacs[0]

it would be fine. But when the index is other than zero, you have to put the ampersand with it.

-- pete

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Somehow I don't think his real intent was to compare a single character of his array to the string being passed in. –  Brian Roach Mar 27 '11 at 20:18
    
@Brian -- Somehow I don't think you are wrong. strcmp( ) does not compare a single character, by definition. Why do you think it does? I think he wants to START the multi-char compare at ClientMacs[x] and continue the multi-char compare until strcmp( ) finds a NUL in one or the other string. That's what strcmp( ) does. Who said anything about single-char compares? –  Pete Wilson Mar 27 '11 at 20:33
    
@Pete - He did, by trying to pass ClientMacs[x] (A single character) to strcmp (which of course takes a char*). Your changes will make it work, but only by nullifying his loop entirely. The first iteration where you have him pass in &ClientMacs[0] will either succeed or fail - it's the same thing as passing ClientMacs - it's a pointer to the first byte of the array. His logic only makes sense if he thought he had a multi-dimensional array. –  Brian Roach Mar 27 '11 at 20:44
    
The dangling , in his initial assignment adds additional credence to that theory. –  Brian Roach Mar 27 '11 at 20:51
    
Sorry - I worded that incorrectly - the point I'm trying to make is there's little logic in doing what you describe. Why would he be trying to find out if the string matched starting somewhere in the first 10 bytes? –  Brian Roach Mar 27 '11 at 21:04

there's and & missing ... non-pointer <-> pointer

BOOL Checking(LPCSTR MacID) {

    const char* ClientMacs[18] = { "11:22:33:44:55:66",};

     for(int x=0; x < 10; x++) {

         if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs[x])) {

              printf(MacID," Successed!");

              return true;

         }

    }

    return false;

}

perhaps

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now gets crashed –  Valtentin Mar 27 '11 at 20:15
    
what is the error? –  Ronny Brendel Mar 27 '11 at 20:17
    
dont know, then is crashed windows ask for debuging –  Valtentin Mar 27 '11 at 20:21
    
The error is that when x > 0, this code passes a null pointer to strcmp(). –  Jason Orendorff Aug 8 at 19:41

I don't think you're quite understanding how strings (or pointers) work in C.

You are trying to compare a single character of your character array to the string being passed in:

if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs[x])
share|improve this answer
    
strcmp( ) doesn't work here. For a one-char compare, do this: –  Pete Wilson Mar 27 '11 at 20:38
    
if ( MacID[x] == ClientMacs[x] ) { ... } or similar. –  Pete Wilson Mar 27 '11 at 20:39
    
That was my point, Pete. Will Dean has the correct answer. Unfortunately the poor guy will probably never see it (Though he might come back when he tries to assign { "<mac address>", "<mac address>" } to his character array). –  Brian Roach Mar 27 '11 at 20:59
if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs[x]))
                // ^^^^^^^^^^^ gives the character at index x

Probably you meant -

if(!strcmp(MacID, &ClientMacs[x]))
                //^  Added & symbol

Given the printf statement, I think, there is no need to compare character by character. There is no need of loop. This can be -

 for(int x=0; x < 10; x++) {
    if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs[x])) {
        printf(MacID," Successed!");
        return true;
    }
}

condensed to -

if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs)) {  // Changed ClientMacs[x] to ClientMacs
    printf(MacID," Successed!");
    return true;
}
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ClientMacs needs to be an array of pointers to chars (string pointers), not an array of chars. You might as well use the LPCSTR typedef, because you've also used it for the function parameter.

Try this:

BOOL Checking(LPCSTR MacID) {

    LPCSTR ClientMacs[18] = { "11:22:33:44:55:66", [put the other 9 (or is it 17?) MAC address strings here]};

    for(int x=0; x < 10; x++) {

         if(!strcmp(MacID, ClientMacs[x])) {
            printf(MacID," Successed!");
            return true;
         }
    }
}

Your naming is generally pretty horrible, but I haven't changed that.

share|improve this answer
    
@Will -- I'm afraid that what you say is not exactly true. OP doesn't want an array of pointers, but a pointer to somewhere inside the char array ClientMacs[]. –  Pete Wilson Mar 27 '11 at 20:19
    
@Pete - I don't think he does. I think that's what he ended up with trying to do what Will outlines above (Note the dangling , in his char array assignment and it makes no sense to compare the first 10 characters) –  Brian Roach Mar 27 '11 at 20:21
    
dodwords: mov eax,[edx] cmp al,[ecx] jne short donene or al,al jz short doneeq cmp ah,[ecx + 1] jne short donene or ah,ah jz short doneeq shr eax,16 ->>> it crash on cmp al,[ecx] on file strcmp.asm using 2005 debug –  Valtentin Mar 27 '11 at 20:27
1  
I have added an annotation as to where the missing addresses are - I'm 95% sure he's trying to see if the supplied address matches any of a list of possibilities. –  Will Dean Mar 27 '11 at 20:36
1  
This question is so full of fail (not your reply - that's basically on the money). Note that !strcmp() is going to result in the printf() being called and returning when the strings don't match. Of course you'll never see "Successed" as the printf() is wrong as well; it's only going to print the MacID. –  Brian Roach Mar 27 '11 at 21:25

Since you've tagged this C++, I'd advise against using strcmp at all, and use std::string instead:

std::set<std::string> ClientMacs;

ClientMacs.insert("11:22:33:44:55:66");
 // presumably insert more MAC addresses here


bool check(std::string const &MacID) {    
    if (ClientMacs.find(MacID) != ClienMacs.end()) {
        std::cout << "Success!";
        return true;
    }
}

I should add, however, that it's not entirely clear what you're trying to accomplish here. My assumption is that you have a list of possible MAC addresses (e.g., of all the computers in your local network) and you're trying to verify that a MAC address you've received (e.g., in an Ethernet packet) matches one of those (e.g., for something on the order of a firewall that will ensure that only packets from known sources are accepted).

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