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I want to use switch-case in my program but the compiler generates an error. How can I use the switch statement with a QString?

The compiler gives me this error:

switch expression of type 'QString' is illegal

My code is as follows:

bool isStopWord( QString word )
{
bool flag = false ;

switch( word )
{
case "the":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "at" :
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "in" :
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "your":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "near":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "all":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "this":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
}

return flag ;
}
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3  
Please post the code that's not working, and the exact error message the compiler is giving. We can't guess what you're doing wrong. –  Mat Mar 27 '11 at 20:30
    
A switch statement "in Qt" is just like any C++ switch statement You need to post code which shows the problem you are having. –  Håvard S Mar 27 '11 at 20:31
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7 Answers

"How can I use the switch statement with a QString?"

You can't. In C++ language switch statement can only be used with integral or enum types. You can formally put an object of class type into a switch statement, but that simply means that the compiler will look for a user-defined conversion to convert it to integral or enum type.

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This sounds cool - but not detailed enough for my to do it. Can you provide sample code? –  Michelle Sep 29 '13 at 18:18
1  
@Michelle: There's no meaningful way to convert a generic string to integer or enum type, which means that there's no meaningful way to use a general QString in a switch statement. So, my answer is: "it can't be done". In general case you can forget about switch statement and use a sequence if if statements instead. –  AndreyT Sep 29 '13 at 19:14
    
@Michelle: One example of a specific case when it becomes possible with a switch is when your strings come from a restricted and pre-defined table of strings. In that case you can convert your string to its index and use that index as selector value in switch statement. That's exactly what olarva's answer is illustrating. –  AndreyT Sep 29 '13 at 19:16
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You can, creating an QStringList before iteration, like this:

QStringList myOptions;
myOptions << "goLogin" << "goAway" << "goRegister";

/* goLogin=0 goAway=1 goRegister=2 */

Then:

switch(myOptions.indexOf("goRegister")){
case 0:
// go to login...
break;

case 1;
// go away..
break;

case 2:
//Go to Register...
break;

default:
...
break;
}
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As previously noted this is not a Qt problem, switch statements can only use constant expressions, look at the collection classes a QSet is a good solution

void initStopQwords(QSet<QString>& stopSet)
{
    // Ideally you want to read these from a file
    stopSet << "the";
    stopSet << "at";
    ...

}

bool isStopWord(const QSet<QString>& stopSet, const QString& word)
{
    return stopSet.contains(word);
}
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This has nothing to do with Qt, just as it has nothing to do with the colour of your socks.

C++ switch syntax is as follows:

char c = getc();
switch( c ) {
case 'a':
    a();
    break;
case 'b':
    b();
    break;
default:
    neither();
}

If that doesn't help then please list in detail the error message, possible along with the colour of you socks.

Edit: to respond to your reply, you can't use switch with none-integral types. In particular, you can't use class types. Not objects of type QString and not objects of any other type. You can use an if-else if-else construct instead, or you can use runtime or compile time polymorphism, or overloading, or any of the array of alternatives to a switch.

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1  
I have a black and a white sock on, that seems to fix all my switchs. –  Jake Kalstad Mar 27 '11 at 20:34
1  
I have one TCP sock and one UDP sock, and they didn't help at all :( –  Jeremy Friesner Mar 27 '11 at 20:51
    
Heh... I have a DCCP sock :P –  Nathan Osman Oct 21 '11 at 6:12
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case "the":
    //^^^ case label must lead to a constant expression

I am not aware of qt, but you can give this a try. You can avoid switch and directly use == for comparison, if QString is no different than a normal std::string.

if( word == "the" )
{
   // ..
}
else if( word == "at" )
{
   // ..
}
// ....
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1  
"the" definitely is a constant expression. It evaluates to an address of a char whose value is t. But an address is not an integer. –  wilhelmtell Mar 27 '11 at 22:04
    
@wilhelmtell - Thanks. Corrected. –  Mahesh Mar 28 '11 at 0:26
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This seems a little saner IMHO.

bool isStopWord( QString w ) {
    return (
        w == "the" ||
        w == "at" ||
        w == "in" ||
        w == "your" ||
        w == "near" ||
        w == "all" ||
        w == "this"
    );
}
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It is identical to a C++ switch statement.

switch(var){
  case(option1):
      doesStuff();
      break;
  case(option2):
     etc();
     break;
}
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2  
I see some syntax errors here.. :) –  Kiril Kirov Mar 27 '11 at 20:35
    
doh, edited. wtb stackoverflow comment compile time checks. –  Jake Kalstad Mar 27 '11 at 20:36
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