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I want to use switch-case in my program but the compiler generates an error. How can I use the switch statement with a QString?

The compiler gives me this error:

switch expression of type 'QString' is illegal

My code is as follows:

bool isStopWord( QString word )
{
bool flag = false ;

switch( word )
{
case "the":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "at" :
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "in" :
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "your":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "near":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "all":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
case "this":
    flag = true ;
    break ;
}

return flag ;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Please post the code that's not working, and the exact error message the compiler is giving. We can't guess what you're doing wrong. –  Mat Mar 27 '11 at 20:30
    
A switch statement "in Qt" is just like any C++ switch statement You need to post code which shows the problem you are having. –  Håvard S Mar 27 '11 at 20:31
    

10 Answers 10

How can I use the switch statement with a QString?

You can't. In C++ language switch statement can only be used with integral or enum types. You can formally put an object of class type into a switch statement, but that simply means that the compiler will look for a user-defined conversion to convert it to integral or enum type.

share|improve this answer
    
This sounds cool - but not detailed enough for my to do it. Can you provide sample code? –  Telium Sep 29 '13 at 18:18
1  
@Michelle: There's no meaningful way to convert a generic string to integer or enum type, which means that there's no meaningful way to use a general QString in a switch statement. So, my answer is: "it can't be done". In general case you can forget about switch statement and use a sequence if if statements instead. –  AnT Sep 29 '13 at 19:14
    
@Michelle: One example of a specific case when it becomes possible with a switch is when your strings come from a restricted and pre-defined table of strings. In that case you can convert your string to its index and use that index as selector value in switch statement. That's exactly what olarva's answer is illustrating. –  AnT Sep 29 '13 at 19:16
    
Actually, this is possibly by the standard library, not the core language, but C++ means the standard library to many, too. –  lpapp Dec 20 '14 at 11:52

You can, creating an QStringList before iteration, like this:

QStringList myOptions;
myOptions << "goLogin" << "goAway" << "goRegister";

/* goLogin=0 goAway=1 goRegister=2 */

Then:

switch(myOptions.indexOf("goRegister")){
case 0:
// go to login...
break;

case 1;
// go away..
break;

case 2:
//Go to Register...
break;

default:
...
break;
}
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1  
The only problem with it is that it is fragile, i.e. overlapping string values. The real solution is proper mapping, although that is not a Qt idea, just general concept. –  lpapp Dec 20 '14 at 11:54

As previously noted this is not a Qt problem, switch statements can only use constant expressions, look at the collection classes a QSet is a good solution

void initStopQwords(QSet<QString>& stopSet)
{
    // Ideally you want to read these from a file
    stopSet << "the";
    stopSet << "at";
    ...

}

bool isStopWord(const QSet<QString>& stopSet, const QString& word)
{
    return stopSet.contains(word);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
However if you take it as a Qt problem you can convert strings to enum values to use in switch because there are already support in Qt –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Sep 18 '14 at 10:40
1  
@LưuVĩnhPhúc: this happens when C++ people answer without Qt expertise. –  lpapp Dec 20 '14 at 11:52

try this:

// file qsswitch.h
#ifndef QSSWITCH_H
#define QSSWITCH_H

#define QSSWITCH(__switch_value__, __switch_cases__) do{\
    const QString& ___switch_value___(__switch_value__);\
    {__switch_cases__}\
    }while(0);\

#define QSCASE(__str__, __whattodo__)\
    if(___switch_value___ == __str__)\
    {\
    __whattodo__\
    break;\
    }\

#define QSDEFAULT(__whattodo__)\
    {__whattodo__}\

#endif // QSSWITCH_H

how to use:

#include "qsswitch.h"

QString sW1 = "widget1";
QString sW2 = "widget2";

class WidgetDerived1 : public QWidget
{...};

class WidgetDerived2 : public QWidget
{...};

QWidget* defaultWidget(QWidget* parent)
{
    return new QWidget(...);
}

QWidget* NewWidget(const QString &widgetName, QWidget *parent) const
{
    QSSWITCH(widgetName,
             QSCASE(sW1,
             {
                 return new WidgetDerived1(parent);
             })
             QSCASE(sW2,
             {
                 return new WidgetDerived2(parent);
             })
             QSDEFAULT(
             {
                 return defaultWidget(parent);
             })
             )
}

there is some simple macro magic. after preprocessing this:

QSSWITCH(widgetName,
         QSCASE(sW1,
         {
             return new WidgetDerived1(parent);
         })
         QSCASE(sW2,
         {
             return new WidgetDerived2(parent);
         })
         QSDEFAULT(
         {
             return defaultWidget(parent);
         })
         )

will work like this:

// QSSWITCH
do{
        const QString& ___switch_value___(widgetName);
        // QSCASE 1
        if(___switch_value___ == sW1)
        {
            return new WidgetDerived1(parent);
            break;
        }

        // QSCASE 2
        if(___switch_value___ == sW2)
        {
            return new WidgetDerived2(parent);
            break;
        }

        // QSDEFAULT
        return defaultWidget(parent);
}while(0);
share|improve this answer
    
It would be helpful to add some explanation of the code. –  fedorqui Sep 12 '14 at 11:55
1  
is it clear now? –  moskk Sep 12 '14 at 14:56
    
yes, way better. Well done! –  fedorqui Sep 12 '14 at 14:57
    
IMHO it's still not much clearer compared to a series of if-else –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Sep 18 '14 at 10:43

This has nothing to do with Qt, just as it has nothing to do with the colour of your socks.

C++ switch syntax is as follows:

char c = getc();
switch( c ) {
case 'a':
    a();
    break;
case 'b':
    b();
    break;
default:
    neither();
}

If that doesn't help then please list in detail the error message, possible along with the colour of you socks.

Edit: to respond to your reply, you can't use switch with none-integral types. In particular, you can't use class types. Not objects of type QString and not objects of any other type. You can use an if-else if-else construct instead, or you can use runtime or compile time polymorphism, or overloading, or any of the array of alternatives to a switch.

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1  
I have a black and a white sock on, that seems to fix all my switchs. –  Jake Kalstad Mar 27 '11 at 20:34
1  
I have one TCP sock and one UDP sock, and they didn't help at all :( –  Jeremy Friesner Mar 27 '11 at 20:51
    
Heh... I have a DCCP sock :P –  Nathan Osman Oct 21 '11 at 6:12
case "the":
    //^^^ case label must lead to a constant expression

I am not aware of qt, but you can give this a try. You can avoid switch and directly use == for comparison, if QString is no different than a normal std::string.

if( word == "the" )
{
   // ..
}
else if( word == "at" )
{
   // ..
}
// ....
share|improve this answer
1  
"the" definitely is a constant expression. It evaluates to an address of a char whose value is t. But an address is not an integer. –  wilhelmtell Mar 27 '11 at 22:04
    
@wilhelmtell - Thanks. Corrected. –  Mahesh Mar 28 '11 at 0:26

This seems a little saner IMHO.

bool isStopWord( QString w ) {
    return (
        w == "the" ||
        w == "at" ||
        w == "in" ||
        w == "your" ||
        w == "near" ||
        w == "all" ||
        w == "this"
    );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, yeah, the rust and haskell style. This is what I have seen many people using. –  lpapp Dec 20 '14 at 11:52

You can switch on a string with QMetaEnum

In the header file declare a class like normal. Inside the class remember to declare an enum with the strings to be switched and add it to the metadata with Q_ENUMS in order for the program to search later.

#include <QMetaEnum>

class TestCase : public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
    Q_ENUMS(Cases)

public:
    explicit Test(QObject *parent = 0);

    enum Cases
    {
        THE, AT, IN, THIS // ...
    };

public slots:
    void SwitchString(QString word);
};

Then in the .c file implement the needed switch after converting the string to the corresponding value. The comparison is case sensitive so if you want a case insensitive search, convert the input string to upper/lower case first. You can also do other transformations needed to the string. For example in case you need to switch strings with blank spaces or unallowed characters in C/C++ identifiers, you may convert/remove/replace those characters to make the string a valid identifier.

void TestCase::SwitchString(QString word)
{

    QMetaObject MetaObject = this->staticMetaObject;
    QMetaEnum MetaEnum = MetaObject.enumerator(MetaObject.indexOfEnumerator("Cases"));

    switch (MetaEnum.keysToValue(word.toUpper().toLatin1()))
    {
        case THE:  /* do something */ break;
        case AT:   /* do something */ break;
        case IN:   /* do something */ break;
        case THIS: /* do something */ break;
        default:   /* do something */ break;
    }
}

Then just use the class for switching the strings. For example:

TestCase test;
test.SwitchString("At");
test.SwitchString("the");
test.SwitchString("aBCdxx");

More information about this here: Q_ENUM and how to switch on a string

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check out this it helps me

int main(int, char **) {

static const uint red_hash = 30900;
static const uint green_hash = 7244734;
static const uint blue_hash = 431029;

else
static const uint red_hash = 112785;
static const uint green_hash = 98619139;
static const uint blue_hash = 3027034; endif

QTextStream in(stdin), out(stdout);
out << "Enter color: " << flush;
const QString color = in.readLine();
out << "Hash=" << qHash(color) << endl;

QString answer;
switch (qHash(color)) {
case red_hash:
    answer="Chose red";
    break;
case green_hash:
    answer="Chose green";
    break;
case blue_hash:
    answer="Chose blue";
    break;
default:
    answer="Chose something else";
    break;
}
out << answer << endl;

}

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It is identical to a C++ switch statement.

switch(var){
  case(option1):
      doesStuff();
      break;
  case(option2):
     etc();
     break;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I see some syntax errors here.. :) –  Kiril Kirov Mar 27 '11 at 20:35
    
doh, edited. wtb stackoverflow comment compile time checks. –  Jake Kalstad Mar 27 '11 at 20:36

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